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Shrimp For Diabetics

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Balance Your Choices When you have type 2 diabetes, you need to eat a good mix of protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. So what's a well-balanced dinner? A power breakfast? The following meal examples can help you make better choices. Some people find it helps to count carbs. Keep in mind recommendations from your doctor or nutritionist, too. The Count: 2,060 calories, 276 g carbs No food is off-limits with diabetes, but this brunch will blow your carb and calorie budget in a hurry. Experts suggest that meals for people with diabetes should have 45-75 grams of carbohydrates, depending on individual goals. Your body weight, activity, and medications all matter. This meal packs enough carbs for four to five meals. The Count: 294 calories, 40 g carbs This quick meal delivers protein in a scrambled egg, and just 40 carbs, mostly from fiber-rich oatmeal and blueberries. Fiber slows digestion to help prevent blood sugar spikes. People with diabetes need to watch all types of carbs: cereal, bread, rice, pasta, starchy veggies, sweets, fruit, milk, and yogurt. Spread your total carbs across the day. The Count: 1,760 calories, 183 g carbs. Before one bite of burrito, you can get 98 grams of carbs and 810 calories in a basket of chips and salsa. If you're trying to slim down and eat less sodium, like many people with diabetes, the burrito adds 950 calories. You also get way more than a whole day's worth of sodium. The Count: 443 calories, 48 g carbs Lean beef and black beans make this Mexican dish a good option for a diabetic diet. The fiber in the beans can help lower blood cholesterol and control blood sugar. Go heavy on the veggies and light on cheese. Enjoy 10 small corn chips (1 ounce) with a little guacamole. The Count: 2,510 calories, 83 g carbs This classic Southern m Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Should Eat Lots Of Shrimp

Why Diabetics Should Eat Lots Of Shrimp

Shrimp is one of the best food choices a diabetic can make. Here are some of the main reasons: Shrimp Has LOTS of Omega-3 (Omega-3 Fatty Acids) and This Is Extremely Important To the Diabetic Diabetics have damaged cell membranes. They are "insulin resistant" which means they don't respond normally to insulin when it signals the cell to uptake glucose. Glucose can't get across these damaged membranes at the normal rate, and therefore, this sugar builds up in the bloodstream reaping havoc with your body. Repairing these membranes involves eliminating certain things from your diet, especially trans fat which gets subsituted into your cell membranes where the healthy omega-3's should go. This damages your cell membranes and makes them too "stiff." Even if you eliminate trans fat, if you don't get enough omega-3, you won't be able to repair and maintain those damaged cell membranes. Shrimp is one of the very best sources for omega-3. Shrimp Has the Best Kind of Omega-3 There are several different types of omega-3. First, there is a difference between plant derived omega-3 (ALA) and animal derived omega-3 (DHA and EPA). Humans can not use the plant version (ALA) without first converting it and we can only convert about 10% of what we eat. The rest is wasted. Also, diabetics and older people convert at even a lower rate. Therefore, it is best to eat the animal form of omega-3 which we can more easily use. Second, the omega-3 in shrimp and other crustaceans (a type of arthropod) is attached to a phospholipid molecule. This is exactly what is found in the membranes of humans and is easier for the body to absorb than when it's attached to triglyceride molecule like you find in fish. Shrimp Is Very High In Protein, Very Low In Fat, and Contains Virtually No Carb Each bite of succ Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Meat (1 ounce = 7 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbohydrate, fat varies) One ounce of meat is about the size of your thumb; 3 ounces is the size of a deck of cards. No more thant 3 ounces of protein at a meal is recommended. (Try to eat meats from this page only; unfortunately, this means nothing fried.) Very Lean Meat Choices (0-1g fat/ounce and 35 calories) Poultry: Chicken or turkey (white meat, no skin), Cornish hen (no skin). Fish: Fresh or frozen cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, trout, lox, tuna fresh or canned in water. Shellfish: Clams, crab, lobster, scallops, shrimp. Game: Duck or pheasant (no skin), venison, buffalo, ostrich. Cheese: Fat-free (less than 1 gram of fat/ounce), low fat cottage cheese. Other: Processed sandwich meats with less than 1 gram fat or less/ounce, such as: deli thin, shaved meats chipped beef, turkey ham egg whites (2) egg substitutes, plain hot dogs, fat free sausage, fat free or less than 1 gram fat/ounce Lean Meat Choices (3g fat/ounce and 55 calories) Beef: USDA Select or Choice grades trimmed of fat such as round, sirloin, flank steak, tenderloin, roast (rib, chuck, rump); steak (T-bone, porter house, cubed); ground round. Pork: Lean pork such as fresh ham, canned, cured, or boiled ham, Canadian bacon, tenderloin, center loin chop. Lamb: Roast, chop or leg. Veal: Leap chop, roast. Poultry: Chicken, turkey (dark meat, no skin), chicken (white meat, with skin), domestic duck or goose (well-drained of fat, no skin). Fish: Herring (uncreamed or smoked), Oysters, Salmon (fresh or canned), catfish, Sardines (canned), tuna (canned in oil, drained). Game: Goose (no skin, rabbit). Cheese: 4.5% fat cottage cheese, grated parmesan, cheeses with 3 grams of fat or less/ounce. Other: Hot dogs with 3 grams of fat or less per ounce. Processed sand Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

1 / 10 Fish Is an Excellent Choice for Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health, but if your only experience with fish has been the fried variety or fish sticks, you might be wondering how and why to include fish in your strategy for eating well with diabetes. “It’s a great protein choice, a source of healthy fat, and it contains important vitamins and minerals,” says Cassandra Rico, MPH, RD, associate director of nutrition and medical affairs for the American Diabetes Association. And the best part of all is that "you don’t have to do a whole lot to seafood to make it taste good," she says. "You can add just a few herbs and bake it in the oven. It’s a lot easier to prepare than I think people perceive.” So get to know your local seafood purveyor and make seafood part of your type 2 diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

8 Foods To Eat To Beat Diabetes (and 5 To Avoid!)

8 Foods To Eat To Beat Diabetes (and 5 To Avoid!)

Carnivores, rejoice: These foods (poultry without the skin) are fair game in a diabetes-friendly diet. Why? Because they're high in protein (result: full stomach) but typically low in fat (result: better weight management). Fatty fish also contains omega-3 fatty acids, which cut down on cardiovascular problems that can accompany diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shrimp Scampi

Diabetic Shrimp Scampi

Directions. Heat butter and oil in large non-stick skillet over high heat. When butter starts to brown, add garlic. Lower heat; cook 1 minute, stirring to prevent garlic from overbrowning. Add shrimp; cook 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add wine, lemon juice, salt and pepper; cook 2 minutes or until shrimp are cooked through. Stir in bread crumbs and parsley. Serve immediately. Download and Print Get 1000's of easy recipes with Recipe-Star.com Recipe-Star.com Advertisement Continue reading >>

Shrimp And Grits

Shrimp And Grits

Ingredients Directions Thaw shrimp, if frozen. Peel and devein shrimp, leaving tails intact if desired; set aside. In a medium saucepan, combine broth, milk, and grits. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 4 to 5 minutes or until grits are desired consistency, stirring occasionally. In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add onion and garlic; cook and stir about 5 minutes or until onion is tender and lightly browned. Remove onion mixture from skillet and set aside. Add shrimp to hot skillet; cook over medium heat for 2 to 4 minutes or until shrimp are opaque, turning occasionally. Stir in onion mixture and parsley. Continue reading >>

Shrimp And Scallops With Cheesy Cream Sauce

Shrimp And Scallops With Cheesy Cream Sauce

Diabetes & You > Recipes > Shrimp and Scallops with Cheesy Cream Sauce Shrimp and Scallops with Cheesy Cream Sauce There are many combinations of seafood that can be used. A more economical version can be made by combining a firm white fish such as cod, grouper or halibut with some of the seafood. Freeze shrimp with their shells to preserve the best taste. 1 lb seafood (shrimp, scallops or combination) 500 g 2 oz goat or feta cheese, crumbled 50 g Sauce: In small saucepan, melt margarine; stir in flour and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add wine and milk; cook, stirring, until thickened and smooth, approximately 2 minutes. Set aside and keep warm. In nonstick skillet, melt margarine; saut garlic, green onions and seafood just until seafood is opaque. Remove from stove; add sauce and mix well. Pour into serving dish; sprinkle parsley and cheese over top. Canadas Choice per Serving: 4 Meat & Alternatives Recipe reprinted with permission from Complete Canadian Diabetes Cookbook, Katherine E. Younker, Robert Rose Inc., 2005, . Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes…what Can I Eat?

I Have Diabetes…what Can I Eat?

From the day you are diagnosed with diabetes, type 1 or type 2, everyone around you is going start telling you what you can and cannot eat. Your doctor, friends, brother, mother, father, uncle, children, spouse, and even the television and every magazine and newspaper! (Be wary of the all the diet fads that will not be directed right at you!) By the time you’ve heard it all, you might feel like there’s nothing you’re allowed to eat except for steamed chicken and spinach. Here are three secrets for your life with diabetes around food: Despite what everyone is saying you “can’t” and “shouldn’t” eat, you are the one who puts the food in your mouth…which means you actually can eat anything, in a sense. It is your choice, and while we all would be better if we always chose the healthiest foods, try reminding yourself of this statement: “I can choose to eat whatever I want.” Thinking this way around your choices versus feeling like you aren’t allowed to eat practically anything can be a very helpful tool for feeling more empowered around food. No one can control what you eat except for you. It’s your choice. As people with diabetes, we do want to aim for 70 to 90 percent of the day’s choices to be very healthy, moderate to low in carbohydrates, and whole food choices, but you do not have to be perfect! Enjoying a treat (whether it’s potato chips or chocolate) in moderation is possible, but the key is moderation. Sometimes, putting too many rules around those treats can make us want more and more of them, which is why the way you think about food is going to very important for how you behave around food. Think about the treats you love the most and how to incorporate them carefully and in sensible portions in your week’s nutrition. Never stop Continue reading >>

The 15 Unhealthiest Meals For Diabetics

The 15 Unhealthiest Meals For Diabetics

Keep your blood sugar levels in check by steering clear of these glucose-toxic restaurant meals. Keep your blood sugar levels in check by steering clear of these glucose-toxic restaurant meals. According to the CDC, diabetes mellitus (DM) is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. And 29.1 million peoplewhich is nearly 10% of the populationare living with the disease right now, while some people dont even know they have it. The American Diabetes Association says that 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with the disease each year. Whats shocking is that 90-95% of the population with diabetes has the type thats completely preventable: Type 2. So how do you prevent or ease the symptoms of Type 2 DM? Luckily, the nutrition wizards here at Eat This, Not That! teamed up with the editors of Zero Sugar Diet and discovered which restaurant meals to avoid to keep your blood glucose (blood sugar) levels balanced. Read on, and for more essential tips, dont miss these 15 Secret Diabetes Remedies . The main cause of Type 2 DM is due to a) obesity and b) having such exponentially high blood glucose levels that it exhausts the beta cells in the pancreas. As a result, the pancreas can no longer produce enough insulin to meet the bodys needs. Whats insulin and why do we need it? Insulin is an extremely important hormone, because it helps reduce the amount of sugar in your bloodstream. When you have Type 2 DM, excess sugar isnt utilized or taken up by muscle tissue, adipose (fat) tissue, and your liver as quickly as it should due to the lack of insulin. In other words, it just kind of floats throughout your bloodstream, which can cause serious problems, like hyperglycemiathe state of having too much sugar swarming through your blood. This happens by eating too many gluco Continue reading >>

Asian Stir-fry With Shrimp

Asian Stir-fry With Shrimp

2 teaspoons Asian chili sauce (Sriracha sauce) 3 8 - ounce packages refrigerated spaghetti-shape noodle substitute (such as House Foods Tofu Shirataki brand) 1 12 - ounce package fresh stir-fry vegetable medley (such as Dole brand) 1/4 cup sliced green onions (2) (optional) Thaw shrimp if frozen. Peel and devein shrimp, leaving tails intact if desired. Rinse shrimp; pat dry with paper towels. Set aside. Meanwhile, in a small bowl whisk together the water, hoisin sauce, soy sauce, and Asian chili sauce; set aside. In a 12-inch skillet heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil over medium-high heat. Add shrimp, garlic, and ginger to hot oil. Stir-fry about 2 minutes or until shrimp are opaque. Remove shrimp from skillet; cover with foil set aside. Meanwhile, drain and rinse the noodle substitute; pat dry with paper towels. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon canola oil in the skillet. Add vegetables to hot oil; stir-fry 3 to 4 minutes or until crisp-tender. Add noodle substitute and hoisin sauce mixture to the vegetables in skillet; stir to coat. Return shrimp to skillet; toss together until heated through. Divide among four bowls. If desired, sprinkle with sliced green onions. Drizzle with sesame oil. Serve immediately (sauce will thin as it stands). PER SERVING: 246 cal., 10 g total fat (1 g sat. fat), 130 mg chol., 631 mg sodium, 18 g carb. (5 g fiber, 6 g sugars), 22 g pro. Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Shrimp Recipes

Shrimp Recipes

Shrimp can be found in many sizes and is available year-round from sources all over the world. A 3-ounce serving of cooked shrimp contains almost no fat and zero carbohydrate, but provides about 18 grams of protein. This section includes a wide range of shrimp dishes that can easily fit into a healthy diabetic diet. Continue reading >>

Speedy And Spicy Shrimp Stir-fry

Speedy And Spicy Shrimp Stir-fry

Need a healthy and flavorful dinner in 20 minutes? Try this dish for a flavor blast that's also packed nutrients. Serving Size: 1/6 of recipe (about 2/3 cup stir-fry + 1/2 cup quinoa or brown rice) cup gluten-free low sodium chicken broth In a small bowl, whisk together chicken broth and corn starch, until corn starch dissolves. Whisk in soy sauce and red pepper flakes. In a large nonstick skillet or wok, heat cooking spray over medium-high heat. Add frozen vegetables and cook for about 4 minutes. Add chicken broth mixture to pan and bring to a simmer. Add shrimp and cook for 4 minutes or until shrimp is cooked through. MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Confirm your ingredients are gluten-free and this recipe can be made gluten-free. Asian cooking is all about balance - a concept that's also important for diabetes! Learn how to incorporate balance into your own meals. Stir-fry is an Asian-inspired dish that's perfect when time is tight. Find out exactly how to make this family-friendly dish! View this month's meal plan which features Asian flavors - a healthy, different way of cooking to help you mix it up when planning meals. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk more than 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I Continue reading >>

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