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Should Diabetics Wear Compression Socks

The Ultimate Guide To Diabetic Socks

The Ultimate Guide To Diabetic Socks

As a diabetic, you should be aware of the damage your condition can do to your legs and feet. If your diabetes isn’t properly controlled, your nerves can get damaged as a result of high blood sugar, a condition called diabetic neuropathy. The condition starts with a loss of sensation in the legs and feet. This can further develop into foot ulcers. Advanced ulceration can even result in an amputation. But you can avoid such a terrible fate for your feet if you use protective foot care devices like diabetic socks. You Can Lose Your Foot! A loss of sensation to the legs and the feet results in reduced blood flow to these parts. As a result, you become vulnerable to numerous infections. Pain is our body’s primary response towards many stimuli. If we get hurt, pain is a signal that something is wrong with a part of our body and it needs care. If you cannot feel pain due to nerve damage, any injury, whether large or small, will go undetected and may develop into an ulcer or an infection. Regardless of the type of diabetes you have, research shows that the risk of ulceration increases by two to four times with age. As a result, the chances of you getting a foot ulcer during your lifetime are 1 in 4, or 25%! More often than not, foot ulcers lead to amputations, which account for two-thirds of all non-traumatic amputations in the world. If you develop an ulcer there is a high chance of you losing your foot. The good news is foot amputations are completely preventable through simple interventions. Diabetic Neuropathy – How Does It Manifest? Essentially four types of neuropathies affect diabetics: Peripheral neuropathy, proximal (radiculoplexus) neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy and mononeuropathy (or, focal neuropathy). Out of these, peripheral neuropathy is the most common Continue reading >>

Compression Stockings: How To Use Them

Compression Stockings: How To Use Them

Specially fitted compression stockings are tight at the feet with a gradually looser fit on the leg. Because there are different types, it's best to use the kind that your doctor recommends and that work best for you. Compression stockings: Help improve blood flow. Help keep blood from pooling in the legs. Help relieve symptoms caused by varicose veins, skin ulcers, and deep vein thrombosis. Help prevent problems caused by things like skin ulcers. Will help the most if you wear them every day while you're awake, especially while you're on your feet. You can find more information in these topics: How do you use compression stockings? Compression stockings can be a part of your daily routine. If they fit right, they should be snug but comfortable. It's best to wear them all the time, unless you are bathing or sleeping. Plan on replacing your stockings every 4 to 6 months. At first, putting on a pair of compression stockings can be tricky. But with some practice, you'll find what works for you. Here are some tips: Before you put them on Hand wash new stockings after you buy them. It will make them more flexible and easier to put on. Consider buying a second pair, if you can afford it. That way, you'll have a clean pair to wear while you wash the other. Put a dressing on any open wound before putting on the compression stockings. Keep your stockings by your bed, so you can put them on when you first get up. To put them on Do it early in the morning, when you have the least swelling in your legs. Sit in a chair with a back. This gives you something to lean against as you put on the stockings . Hold the top of the stocking with one hand. Then with your other hand, reach inside the stocking and push your arm all the way in until you reach the end and can grab the toe. When you Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy [en Español]

Diabetic Neuropathy [en Español]

Topic Overview What is diabetic neuropathy? Neuropathy means nerve disease or damage. Diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage caused by diabetes. People who have diabetes often have high blood sugar levels. Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage nerves throughout your body. There are three kinds of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is damage to peripheral nerves . These are the nerves that sense pain, touch, hot, and cold. They also affect movement and muscle strength. The nerves in the feet and lower legs are most often affected. This type of nerve damage can lead to serious foot problems. The damage usually gets worse slowly, over months or years. Focal neuropathy affects just one nerve, usually in the wrist, thigh, or foot. It may also affect the nerves of your back and chest and those that control your eye muscles. This type of nerve damage usually happens suddenly. What causes diabetic neuropathy? Over time, high blood sugar levels from diabetes can damage nerves throughout your body. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more likely you are to have nerve damage. So controlling your blood sugar throughout your life is very important. The older you get, and the longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to have nerve damage. People who have diabetes who drink too much alcohol are also more likely to have nerve damage. Your symptoms will depend on which nerves are injured. You may not be able to feel pain, especially in your feet. This can lead to serious infections, because sores or other problems may not get treated. When other parts of your body are affected, symptoms may include: Problems with digestion, such as bloating, belching, constipation, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and belly pain. Problems with body temperature, such as heavy sweat Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Compression Socks Before You Buy

What You Need To Know About Compression Socks Before You Buy

Vein specialist Dr. Eugene Ichinose is a firm believer in compression socks – not only for patients, but also for himself. He once stood on a chair during a presentation to model the compression socks he wears to help improve circulation as he stands throughout day. Compression socks work by promoting improved blood flow in your legs. The compression of the socks gently pushes blood flow up the leg, helping to prevent swelling and even blood clots. If you have noticed your legs swelling or the appearance of varicose veins, for example, you may wonder if compression socks would be a good idea. Many people can benefit from compression socks after surgery, during pregnancy or as legs become achy, swollen or heavy feeling. However, before heading out to the store or browsing online, there are some things you should consider to make sure you are getting the maximum benefit from compression socks. First, all compression socks are NOT created equal. “The quality of the material, the sizing, the durability and the amount of compression or pressure the garment provides all culminate into the final product,” explains Dr. Ichinose. “Some very economical support hose are not sized by careful measurement of your leg. They are labeled small, medium and large, however the amount of compression provided is not known.” Dr. Ichinose advises patients to know two important things before selecting compression socks: the amount of compression and the size needed. Your health care provider will advise the compression level you need, as well as measure your leg to make sure you are fitted in a proper compression sock. However, you can also measure yourself for compression socks. In the morning before swelling occurs, measure the circumference of your ankle (around your ankle), the ci Continue reading >>

The Right Socks For Diabetes

The Right Socks For Diabetes

Do you know what to wear on your feet? The right socks and shoes can prevent complications and improve your life with diabetes. Find the footwear that’s right for you. Why do people with diabetes need good socks and shoes? Diabetes often slows blood circulation to and from the feet. If blood doesn’t flow well from feet to the heart, legs and feet will swell (called edema). If blood gets stuck in veins, it may form blood clots that can travel to your lungs (pulmonary embolism) or brain (stroke), which can be fatal. Arteries bring blood from the heart to the feet. In poorly controlled diabetes, arteries can be blocked with scar tissue and fat deposits. This is called peripheral arterial disease (PAD). According to the University of California-San Francisco Medical Center, people with diabetes have two to four times the risk of developing PAD compared to those without diabetes. Endocrinologist Bonnie W. Greenwald, MD, says, “Poor blood flow makes it harder for the body to heal, which increases the risk for skin ulcers and gangrene, or tissue death.” The end result can sometimes be amputation of a foot or leg. This is where shoes and socks come in. The right footwear can protect feet from injury and infection. It can also improve circulation through the lower half of your body. Diabetes socks Diabetes socks protect feet from injury. According to the medical equipment company Sigvaris, “Most diabetic socks are soft, provide padding on the sole of the foot, and should conform to the foot/leg without wrinkles,” which could irritate the skin. They shouldn’t have anything sharp in them, so they are often seamless or have “flat seams” against the toes or foot. The Sigvaris site says, “The fibers should wear evenly, instead of leaving thin spots where friction Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Overview

Diabetic Foot Overview

People with diabetes are at risk for developing foot problems that potentially can be severe. All people with diabetes should make sure to monitor their feet regularly. With a diabetic foot, minor injuries can become major emergencies. A wound as small as a blister from wearing a shoe that's too tight can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes may also decrease your blood flow, so your injuries can be slow to heal, putting you at higher risk for infection. As a diabetic, your infection may spread quickly, and if you have any loss of sensation (neuropathy) you may not recognize that the problem is getting worse. If you have diabetes, inspect your feet every day: ​Look for puncture wounds, bruises, pressure areas, redness, warmth, blisters, ulcers, scratches, cuts and nail problems. Get someone to help you, or use a mirror. Feel each foot for swelling. Examine between your toes. Check six major locations on the bottom of each foot: tip of the big toe, base of the little toes, base of the middle toes, heel, outside edge of the foot and across the ball of the foot. Check for sensation in each foot. If you find any injury -- no matter how slight -- don't try to treat it yourself. Go to a medical doctor right away. Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. Test the water temperature with your hand first. Don't soak your feet. When drying them, pat each foot with a towel and be careful between your toes. Use quality lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist -- but don't put any lotion between your toes. Trim your toe nails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, see your doctor. Don't use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads, or sharp instruments on your feet. Always kee Continue reading >>

Why Use Compression Socks?

Why Use Compression Socks?

Have you heard of compression socks? Do you know what they do? Do they make you think of your grandmother? Compression socks can relieve things like leg pain, cramps, and varicose veins. People often associate them with older people or as something diabetics often wear. Did you know they can also help you if you often have to sit or stand for long periods of time, if you are active or sedentary, young or old? I’ll bet you didn’t know they come in many styles from ultra sheer to super sexy. Not just for grandmothers anymore! Today, we’ll be talking about what compression socks are, and how they can help you find relief from many uncomfortable or painful conditions. What are compression socks and what do they do? Compression socks are tight stockings that are worn to help increase blood circulation. They are made from many different kinds of fibre, such as nylon, cotton, spandex, or natural rubber. They are knit using different blends or thicknesses depending on the intended compression level, and the desired look and feel of the final product. Compression socks are worn to increase blood flow in your legs. By putting pressure on your legs, they make veins and blood vessels smaller, causing blood to flow through at a stronger pace and allowing valves to work better. Basically, it increases the blood pressure in your legs to allow it to get recirculated back up to your heart rather than pooling in your lower legs and feet. Reasons for prescribing compression socks There are a lot of symptoms and conditions compression socks can help with: Diabetes Diabetes can have a significant affect on your body’s ability to efficiently circulate your blood. This is why diabetic foot complications are so serious and such a real threat to a diabetic person’s health. Compression Continue reading >>

About Compression Socks

About Compression Socks

About Compression Socks Compression socks or compression stockings are worn for different reasons. Athletes wear compression socks or compression stockings to perform better in their respective sports. But, these are also worn for comfort or to assist in preventing serious medical conditions. About Compression Socks Compression socks work to improve blood flow. So, these are ideal for women who are pregnant, people who stand at work, people who have undergone surgery, athletes, and people with diabetes and other medical conditions. When compression stockings are worn, the pressure increases blood vessel work. That results in more oxygen rich blood flowing through your body, which allows muscles to relax. Compression socks come in different types, doing different jobs. For instance, compression stockings are worn to squeeze the legs. But graduated compression socks place more pressure around the ankles, placing less pressure up the legs. There are also compression sleeves, which are only worn around the feet. The purpose of wearing compression socks, sleeves, and stockings is to improve blood flow, in the ankles, feets, and legs, respectively. And, these are also used to help lower chances of deep vein thrombosis or DVT, which is a type of blood clot. They’re also helpful for diabetics when worn as they increase blood flood in the feet. Where to Buy Compression Socks Compression socks are available at most drug stores. Additionally, compression socks, stockings, and sleeves are also sold at medical supply stores. These can also be purchased online. The price ranges widely, depending on the type and quality. For help with any foot problems in the Houston Tx area please see Continue reading >>

Diabetics, Pay Special Attention To Your Legs And Feet

Diabetics, Pay Special Attention To Your Legs And Feet

Do you know someone who has been diagnosed with diabetes? Please spread the word how important it is for diabetics to take care of their health, and pay special attention to their legs and feet. To keep their feet and legs healthy, they need to inspect them daily and note any changes they see like open sores or swelling. Many times their doctor may tell them to wear special diabetic shoes and socks, which are made especially for diabetics to keep their feet healthy. People with diabetes many times have circulation issues that can cause swelling in their feet, ankles and legs. Swelling can occur in people who are not diabetics too by standing or sitting for long periods of time, physical inactivity, heredity, pregnancy, surgery, trauma and some illnesses. Current research tells us that people who experience tired and aching legs become less active therefore wearing graduated compression stocks can increase the energy they feel in their legs and increase their activity level. Graduated compression socks effectively promote venous blood flow by providing a gentle graduated pressure to leg veins and valves. A calf-length compression sock that goes over the calf muscle can be the most effective. The support from the compression sock helps the vein walls return to their normal state, allowing the valves to properly function, thus aiding the blood flow back toward the lungs and heart which is a really good thing. Diabetics should always consult with their physician prior to wearing graduated compression socks. As there are different levels of compression that can be worn as well as different styles from knee high, to thigh high and even panty hose depending on each person’s need. Their doctor who treats them for their diabetes will be the right person to know how much compre Continue reading >>

How Do Compression Socks Help Diabetics?

How Do Compression Socks Help Diabetics?

Do you suffer from diabetes? If so, you probably get swelling (peripheral edema) in your legs, ankles and feet. This swelling is caused by poor blood circulation. Diabetics experience this due to high blood-glucose levels that thicken the blood. This thickened blood is then prevented from flowing freely through the smaller capillaries in places such as the toes and feet. This can be serious. If not controlled, diabetes can lead to a host of problems such as ulcers and nerve damage. If you suffer damaged nerves, you may not be aware if your foot is injured, which can lead to infections — even amputation. Compression wear Since the 1950s, graduated compression garments have been used as treatment for poor blood circulation. In fact, compression wear is thought to have originated in Taiwan where people applied pressure to their legs while bathing in hot springs. We now know that compression socks are effective for helping diabetics. What are compression socks? Compression socks come in a range of compression levels, known as millimetres of mercury (mmHg). They are made from specially selected fabrics that create pressure on the legs, ankles and feet. This pressure reduces the diameter of swollen veins in the legs, which speeds up blood flow and pushes the blood gently up the body. TXG compression socks provide strong protection for the ankles thanks to a unique x-pattern structure. They also have no raised seams, which can be the source of irritation with ordinary socks. Diabetic compression socks Due to the requirements of the US Diabetics Association, you’ll find that good quality diabetic compression socks are available in white only. There is a good reason for this: Many diabetics suffer from nerve damage, so white socks make it easier for them to detect sores that Continue reading >>

Diabetic Compression Socks

Diabetic Compression Socks

If you are someone who has been diagnosed with diabetes, you have probably been working closely with your physician, diabetic educator and pharmacist on how to best take care of your health with an important emphasis on your legs and feet. New research shows that, for many diabetic patients, compression socks can help keep legs and feet healthy, as well as allow the patient to have a more active lifestyle. Wearing graduated compression socks and hosiery has been a mainstay for reducing and maintaining edema in people since the 1950s. Sigvaris Diabetic Compression Socks Clinically Proven to alleviate Discomfort in Legs! Compression: 18-25mmHg Features and Benefits: Non-Binding Band Flat toe seam Soft with extra padding on foot DriRelease for moisture wicking and odor control True graduated compression Latex-free In a recent study, the use of SIGVARIS Diabetic Compression Socks was shown to reduce edema in 19 patients with diabetes. These patients were 100% satisfied with the ease of care they received and with the overall comfort, and unanimously said they would recommend the use of SIGVARIS Diabetic Compression Sock. 1 The study concluded : “Based on the results of this pilot study, using diabetic compression socks may help decrease swelling in diabetic patients with lower extremity edema without compromising lower extremity vascularity. 1 Please note: Most diabetic patients with mild to medium edema will benefit from reduced swelling when wearing Diabetic Compression Socks. However, not all diabetic patients should wear compression. Patients should speak with their doctor before wearing this product. If a patient experiences any discomfort while wearing this garment, they should remove it and consult their doctor. 1 Control of lower Extremity Edema in Persons with Di Continue reading >>

Finding Relief From Neuropathy

Finding Relief From Neuropathy

Seven tips to help you ease—and maybe even avoid—neuropathy and feel your very best. If you have diabetes and don’t yet have neuropathy, it may be a matter of time before you develop it: The nerve disorder, which usually affects the toes, feet and hands, occurs most often in those who’ve had diabetes for 25 years or more. For some, the condition has no symptoms; for others, numbness and tingling result; and still others use words like stinging, burning and shooting to describe the discomfort. The good news? You don’t have to suffer! These seven tips can help ease any distress. 1. Cover your feet: Compression stockings or socks can improve your neuropathy by providing a cushion for your feet against sudden injury. Opt for densely padded socks made of acrylic fiber with nylon and spandex for elasticity—the combo produces less pressure. Plus, if your socks are made with special synthetic materials, they’ll retain less moisture than cotton socks, which reduces your chance of developing foot ulcers. 2. Talk to your doctor about medication options: While ordinary OTC solutions may work for mild aches, sometimes doctors will prescribe antiseizure or antidepressant medications to treat your condition. In addition, there are a couple FDA-approved drugs currently available for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. 3. Soak your feet: A warm foot bath with Epsom salts is a simple and relaxing home remedy for your discomfort. Not only will the soak reduce tension and swelling, the magnesium in the Epsom salts can help to relax muscles. Fill a container with enough warm water to cover your feet completely, and pour in ¼ cup salt for each cup of water in the bath. Note: Ask your doctor before soaking in Epsom salts. If you have an infection or any swelling, the soak cou Continue reading >>

Compression Stockings: One Size Definitely Does Not Fit All

Compression Stockings: One Size Definitely Does Not Fit All

Proper selection and sizing of compression hosiery can be confusing, but both are essential for control of edema and management of more serious vascular conditions in patients with diabetes. And then there’s the even more challenging issue of patient compliance. Fit shoes in the afternoon and compression stockings in the morning. That’s the simple but effective rule that works for Bill Meanwell, CPed, founder, CEO, and director of the International School of Pedorthics in Broken Arrow, OK. Marybeth Crane, MS, DPM, FACFAS, CWS, managing partner at Foot and Ankle Associates of North Texas in Grapevine, also follows a similarly streamlined model. “For diabetics, usually we use 15 to 20 mmHg compression for those with edema and 10 to 15 mmHg for those without. Anything higher than 20 mmHg compression, patients should be custom measured by a physician, especially if they have peripheral arterial disease,” she said. Indeed, the application of compression stockings would seem to be fairly cut and dry: Take leg measurements, use the manufacturer’s guidelines for determining the level of compression, choose a style, and hand over to the patient. But not all diabetic patients are created equal, and neither are compression stockings. At one end of the spectrum are patients who may benefit from support pantyhose for light pressure to prevent or reduce mild swelling, a condition that is not only uncomfortable but can delay wound healing in diabetic patients. At the other end are those who suffer from significant edema or venous leg ulcers who are candidates for prescription-strength compression stockings. And then there are patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Issues that need to be addressed when prescribing compression ho Continue reading >>

Copper Socks In Various Medical Conditions

Copper Socks In Various Medical Conditions

The Ancient Greeks were aware of the healing properties of copper. They used it to aid in fighting off what we know as bacteria and viruses. Ever since the ability to fuse the copper ions to textiles was discovered, people have been looking to find helpful uses for it. One of the most beneficial has been to use copper oxide technology in socks. Ailments of the foot can not only be painful but difficult to heal. Copper socks are now available to help alleviate the effects of conditions like arthritis, varicose veins and diabetes. Why would a doctor say to wear copper socks for these conditions? Because the infusion of copper ions into the material have an anti-bacterial and anti-fungal property. Also, the copper socks promote new skin growth and better circulation. How Do Copper Socks Help with: Why You Wear Copper Socks in Arthritis Arthritis is a condition where there is painful swelling in the joints. It can make it extremely difficult to move around. Wearing copper socks for arthritis, the properties of the copper can help to decrease any swelling by compressing the foot and ankle joint gently and promoting better circulation. This will also help to bring the pain down to a lower level. A joint that is swollen can often be unsteady. The support offered by the copper infused socks helps the joint to be more stable. What a wonderful gift to give your loved one (or yourself) than the ability to become active again! How Copper Socks Can Help in Gout Gout is a disease in which defective metabolism of uric acid causes arthritis, especially in the smaller bones of the feet with episodes of acute pain. This can be especially difficult to deal with as it can effect the toes and smaller bones in the foot, increasing the points of pain when stepped on. Knowing how to combat and Continue reading >>

How To Improve Circulation With Socks

How To Improve Circulation With Socks

Poor circulation occurs when insufficient blood flows to your extremities, according to the UAB Health System. The causes of poor circulation to the feet and legs include excess weight, age, nerve damage due to diabetes or other conditions, alcoholism, vitamin deficiencies, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and lack of exercise. Poor circulation is a serious condition that can lead to amputation, stroke and heart attack. You can use socks to improve circulation in your legs and feet by selecting special socks or wearing socks at certain times. Video of the Day Choose well-fitting socks that do not have tight elastic bands at the top. The elastic bands can impede circulation in your legs. Wear socks to warm your cold feet in the winter, around the house and when you go to bed. Poor circulation and nerve damage can make your feet feel cold. Socks improve circulation by warming your feet. Talk to your doctor about wearing compression socks to improve your circulation. Compression socks squeeze your blood vessels and muscles to create contractions that move the blood along your legs and back to your heart. Graduated compression socks provide more compression at the ankle and decreased compression incrementally along the length of the sock. Compression socks are made of rubber, Lycra or spandex. Ask your doctor which compression level is appropriate for your condition. Compression levels range from 8 to 10 mm HG, a measurement that represents millimeter of mercury, up to 40 to 50 mm Hg. Socks with compression levels higher than 20 mm Hg require a prescription. Purchase compression socks, wear them during the day and take them off at night. Avoid wearing compression socks longer than the doctor-prescribed length of time. Your compression socks should fit without bunching. Continue reading >>

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