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Should Diabetics Eat Honey

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

I have diabetes, and I'm wondering if I can substitute honey for sugar in my diet? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Generally, there's no advantage to substituting honey for sugar in a diabetes eating plan. Both honey and sugar will affect your blood sugar level. Honey is sweeter than granulated sugar, so you might use a smaller amount of honey for sugar in some recipes. But honey actually has slightly more carbohydrates and more calories per teaspoon than does granulated sugar — so any calories and carbohydrates you save will be minimal. If you prefer the taste of honey, go ahead and use it — but only in moderation. Be sure to count the carbohydrates in honey as part of your diabetes eating plan. Continue reading >>

Honey And Cinnamon

Honey And Cinnamon

Not so sure about all of this…but worth passing on if It helps one person! Cinnamon and Honey Honey is the only food on the planet that will not spoil or rot. It will do what some call turning to sugar. In reality honey is always honey. However, when left in a cool dark place for a long time it will do what I rather call "crystallizing". When this happens I loosen the lid, boil some water, and sit the honey container in the hot water, off the heat and let it liquefy. It is then as good as it ever was. Never boil honey or put it in a microwave. To do so will kill the enzymes in the honey. Cinnamon and Honey ~ Bet the drug companies won't like this one getting around.~ Facts on Honey and Cinnamon: It is found that a mixture of honey and Cinnamon cures most diseases. Honey is produced in most of the countries of the world. Scientists of today also accept honey as a 'Ram Ban' (very effective) medicine for all kinds of diseases. Honey can be used without any side effects for any kind of diseases. Today's science says that even though honey is sweet, if taken in the right dosage as a medicine, it does not harm diabetic patients. Weekly World News, a magazine in Canada , in its issue dated 17 January,1995 has given the following list of diseases that can be cured by honey and cinnamon as researched by western scientists: HEART DISEASES: Make a paste of honey and cinnamon powder, apply on bread, instead of jelly and jam, and eat it regularly for breakfast. It reduces the cholesterol in the arteries and saves the patient from heart attack. Also, those who have already had an attack, if they do this process daily, they are kept miles away from the next attack. Regular use of the above process relieves loss of breath and strengthens the heart beat. In America and Canada , variou Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Honey? The Research Will Surprise You

Can Diabetics Eat Honey? The Research Will Surprise You

Honey is an all-natural food nicknamed Nature’s Sweetener. Humans have likely been eating it for tens, if not hundreds of thousands of years. And not only for its sweet flavour, but for its medicinal properties too. Sounds like something we should be eating more of right? Yet when you break it right down, honey is essentially sugar. We know that a high sugar diet is bad for you, which is why many consider honey unhealthy. So is honey good for us or not? Perhaps more importantly… Can diabetics eat honey? Honey vs Sugar: How does it compare? Honey is made in the bee-hive from flower nectar. The process is a collective effort that requires honey bees to consume, digest and regurgitate nectar repeatedly. For this reason the nutritional properties of honey depend on the nectar available around the hive. A typical batch of honey compared with sugar looks like this (1): You can see honey contains water and many trace vitamins and minerals that sugar doesn’t. That’s why honey is only 82% sugar by weight, while sugar is 99.9%… And that’s also why honey contains fewer calories than sugar. It’s hard to argue the winner here. Honey is also reported to contain at nearly 200 different substances, especially antioxidants. Antioxidants are thought to protect against many forms of disease (2). The Glycemic Index (GI) ranges considerably depending on the type of honey, but the entire GI concept itself is unpredictable anyway. Summary: Honey is not pure sugar. It also contains water and small amounts of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, which vary depending on the type of honey. Honey vs Sugar: Effects on blood sugar and insulin The impact of honey consumption on blood sugar levels tends to be slightly better than regular sugar. One small experimental study on healthy sub Continue reading >>

How Does Honey Help Diabetics?

How Does Honey Help Diabetics?

Honey is popular as a natural sweetener. But, did you know that it can help keep diabetes in control? Given that anything ‘sweet’ is out of bounds for diabetics, this sounds impossible, right? Just because honey is sweet to taste, it does not mean that honey and sugar act in the same fashion. The former is actually good for diabetes. Curious? Read on to know how can diabetics eat honey. Diabetes – A Brief Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar levels. It is a disease where your body fails to either produce insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows the cells to use glucose from the food as energy. When this glucose can no longer reach the cells, it stays in your blood, thus raising the blood sugar levels. The ingested sugars and starches cannot be used up as energy, and hence are eliminated through urine (1). Signs And Symptoms Symptoms of diabetes include: Frequent urination Extreme thirst or hunger Weight loss Fatigue Numbness Infection Types Of Diabetes There are two types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t produce any insulin. On the other hand, people who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes either don’t produce enough insulin or their cells do not use it properly. As a result, type 2 diabetes patients tend to be overweight and obese due to the high insulin levels. Their bodies are unable to channel glucose into the muscle cells, and end up converting glucose into fat and cholesterol instead. Can Diabetics Eat Honey? is honey good for diabetics? Well, many people are of the opinion that honey should not be consumed by people who have diabetes. But, is it true? Let’s find out. What makes honey better than refined sugar for diabetes? People ar Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

If you are a diabetic and in love with everything sweet, you don’t really have to give up on your sweet cravings just yet. There is hope for you! People who have diabetes are often told to steer clear of foods that are high on sugar content. But substituting regular or refined sugar with Honey is an alternate they can opt for (in consultation with the doctor of course). Can Sugar Patients/Diabetics eat Honey? We would not say that if you are suffering from diabetes you should consume honey without restriction or without doctor’s consultation. Anything taken in excess can run you the risk of falling sick and especially if you are a diabetic, you have to be extra careful of what you eat as it can drastically effect your blood sugar levels. Honey is a natural sweetener and considered to be a healthier alternative to regular sugar. No doubt, owing to the lesser amount of carbohydrates found in honey, its impact on the one’s blood sugar levels is slightly better than that of sugar. Also, honey is easy to digest compared to sugar and works well in keeping the metabolism levels high. This difference arises because honey is broken down in the body by the enzymes already present in honey. In the case of sugar, you may require enzymes from your body itself. Note that honey should be taken by diabetics after consultation with their doctors. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs due inability of the pancreas to produce or sufficiently utilize insulin. There are four most common forms of diabetes that people suffer from. They are: Type 1 diabetes—a form of diabetes where the pancreas produces little or no amount of insulin Type 2 diabetes—a chronic type of diabetes that affects the way the body processes blood sugar or glucose Prediabetes—a condition in whi Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Raw Honey

Can Diabetics Eat Raw Honey

There have been heated debates on whether as a diabetic one should consume honey or not. Over the fact that honey is sweet most people view consuming honey as a taboo if you are diabetic. Is it safe to consume honey? Despite the fact that honey is sweet, science has indicated that it is completely safe to consume honey as a diabetic. This article has highlighted findings from three studies to support this argument. In one of the study, the goal was to investigate the effects of consuming honey when under diabetes medication that is glibenclamide or metformin. Rats diagnosed with diabetes were used as test subjects and divided into 6 groups. The groups were administered with glibenclamide, glibenclamide and honey, metformin, metformin and honey and water respectively for 4 weeks. The findings indicated that honey significantly increases insulin produced and reduced fructosamine and hyperglycemia. Though glibenclamide and metformin on their own also reduced hyperglycemia, when combined with honey the two indicated low blood sugar levels compared to when drugs alone were administered. Other than that, when the two drugs were taken administered together with honey they reduce the heightening levels of creatinine, bad fats and bad cholesterol in the body. Bad cholesterol causes heart diseases such as coronary artery failure and heart attack which is the major cause of death to people living with diabetes. To most people, it’s a wonder how honey manages to reduce the blood sugar levels. But, science has proven it does and we can’t argue with that. Honey also reduces the levels of bad cholesterol in the body. So how much honey is enough? In this study, two tablespoons were used per day. How honey control the blood glucose levels In yet another study, honey was found to imp Continue reading >>

(edit) Can A Diabetic Eat Honey? Yes, They Can, And They Should!

(edit) Can A Diabetic Eat Honey? Yes, They Can, And They Should!

(Edited March 21, 2012. Since this post originally appeared, there has been some concern about the validity of the content. I have written a second post that gives some things to read that have been written by medical researchers on the positive uses of honey for diabetes. You may want to check it out.) Many doctors will be quick to dismiss honey as a viable sweet option for diabetics. Hold on a sec, Doc! Yes, honey is sweet, but it’s not the same thing as sugar. Unfortunately, most physicians actually have very little training in nutrition. If you’ve been told that it’s a no-no, ask your doctor if fruits are permitted. He or she will probably give the thumbs up. If so, let them know that a tablespoon of raw honey contains about the same amount of carbs as a cup of raw apple. Raw honey is actually kind of a cool mystery in how it breaks down in the body. It is directly converted to liver glycogen and doesn’t raise blood sugar levels like sucrose or high fructose corn syrup does even though it contains the same simple sugars. This fact alone should be reason enough to recommend it over synthetic sweeteners such as Aspartame. When consumed regularly over weeks or months, raw honey will actually LOWER and help balance a person’s blood sugar and HbA1c (glycosylated or glycated hemoglobin) levels. Research has shown that human consumption of raw honey will result in lower blood sugar levels by as much as 60 to 100 mg/dl at 60 and 90 minutes following consumption compared to a similar amount of sucrose. Due to this, there should be no big surprise that HbA1c levels will be lowered by as much as 2-4%. This factor alone should trigger huge variances in the treatment guidelines recommended by most docs, which means fewer drugs. Actually the worse a person’s glucose i Continue reading >>

Can Dogs Eat Honey?

Can Dogs Eat Honey?

Simple and sweet, honey contains natural sugars that is reported to have a wide variety of medicinal properties. It also, occasionally, finds its way into the mouths of our dogs. If your dog has found her way into the honey pot, or if you are contemplating giving honey to your dog for medicinal reasons, you probably want to know if honey is safe for dogs and if there are really any health benefits associated with it. Is honey safe for dogs? Honey is safe for dogs to eat in small quantities. It contains natural sugars and small amounts of vitamins and minerals, and is used as a sweetener in many foods and beverages. That sweetness comes at a price. The high sugar content of honey can lead to obesity in dogs if owners feed too much honey and do not provide adequate exercise balanced nutrition. Sugars can also cause tooth decay, so it might be a good idea to brush your dog's teeth if you do feed him honey. Raw honey should not be fed to puppies or dogs with compromised immune systems, as it may contain the presence of botulism spores. Honey should not be given to diabetic or obese dogs. Benefits of feeding honey to dogs A simple Google search reveals thousands of sites promoting honey as a health supplement for people and pets, including dogs. Honey is purported to have antimicrobial and antifungal properties, reduce inflammation, sooth stomach ulcers and sore throats, and cure allergies. However, there have not been many conclusive scientific studies validating these claims. Many of these claims are anecdotal, but since honey is relatively safe, they are often enough for owners looking for an additional treatment for their dogs that is affordable and safe. One of the most common claims made about honey is that it can cure seasonal allergies in humans and dogs. While the s Continue reading >>

1 Honey As Good As Another

1 Honey As Good As Another

Aug. 24, 2006 -- One honey is as good as another -- at least as far as glucose content is concerned. That's the finding of San Diego State University researchers who investigated claims that some honeys have a better glycemic index than others. Glycemic index is a measure of a food's effects on blood sugar. Foods with a high glycemic index -- starchy foods, for example -- aren't good for people with diabetesdiabetes, or for people trying to lose weight. Jennifer Ilana Ischayek, RD, and Mark Kern, PhD, RD, analyzed four kinds of honey. They looked at buckwheat honey from Oregon, clover honey from Oregon, cotton honey from California, and tupelo honey from Florida. Unlike some earlier studies, they compared apples to apples -- that is, they made sure each honey sample contained the same amount of carbohydrates. They found very little difference in the honeys' glycemic indices. They ranged from 69.13 to 74.14. All were very close to table sugar's glycemic index of 68. However, Ischayek and Kern suggest that honey is probably better for you than table sugar. They note that it's sweeter, so you can use less and thus consume fewer calories. And, they say, honey has healthful antioxidant and prebiotic properties. The study, funded by the National Honey Board, appears in the August issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. Continue reading >>

Honey And Diabetes: Is Honey Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Honey And Diabetes: Is Honey Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

It is often very important to take extreme care of your body when you are suffering from diabetes as the disease brings in a lot of other related complications, such as a number of cardiovascular diseases as well as diseases related to the kidney, nerve damage, diabetic eye, skin diseases, and even amputations of different body parts. A well maintained and regulated lifestyle, coupled with a healthy diet and physical exercise have always been recommended by the doctors. One such regulation is the inclusion of honey in the daily diet. Honey, being a rich source of several vitamins, and several other nutrients are considered very healthy. However, the high content of carbohydrates and fructose often gives rise to the question as to whether the natural sweetener should be consumed by those who suffer from diabetes? In this article, we try to find out the answer to the above question and explore more about “Can Diabetics Eat Honey”. We shall delve deep into the subject of honey for diabetics and analyze whether it is safe to consume honey by a patient who is suffering from diabetes or other related complications. Some Facts Related to Honey Before we begin our discussion on the relation between diabetes and honey and how the consumption of honey affects the blood sugar level and finally diabetes, we should know a few facts about the “Nature’s Sweetener”. Following are a few facts which might help us to understand the relation between diabetes and honey: Honey which is considered as a “Natural Sweetener”, is actually sweeter than the readily available granulated sugar. Being more natural and less processed, honey is considered healthier when compared to the white sugar of the corn syrup. Honey is known to contain a lot of carbohydrates. That is primarily the re Continue reading >>

How Safe Is It For Diabetics To Eat Honey?

How Safe Is It For Diabetics To Eat Honey?

Honey goes by the name of ‘nature’s sweetener’, and our ancestors have not only been consuming it but using it for versatile medicinal purposes as well, practically since the dawn of time. So since it’s both sweet-tasting and healthy, surely we should all try to include it into our daily diets right? Well, as healthy as it is, honey is still basically sugar, and we are all aware of the consequences of eating too much sugar, even if it’s the natural kind. So, the question remains – is honey safe to eat or not? Especially when it comes to those with diabetes. And since this question is anything but simple, let us delve into the topic in more detail before making a final conclusion, shall we? The Comparison Between Sugar and Honey We all learned back in school that honey is the product from the nectar of flowers, thanks to the arduous work of the bees. But not many are aware that honey’s nutritional properties depend on the nectar which is available around the beehive. Obviously, when compared to regular sugar, honey ‘takes the cake’ by being much healthier and nutritious. It has many more vitamins and minerals which sugar lacks. Furthermore, honey is only 82% sugar, while sugar is (no shocker) 99.9% sugar. Which, naturally, makes honey less caloric and a far better alternative for sweetening things up! It is also rather high in antioxidants which can stop and treat a vast number of diseases. It’s glycemic index, however, is rather unpredictable as it varies from variety to variety. Effects on Insulin and Blood Sugar: Honey versus Sugar The impact which the consumption of honey has on one’s blood glucose levels is slightly better than that of sugar. However, the keyword here is slightly. A number of studies conducted on patients with Type II diabetes Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Honey is lower on the glycemic index than granulated sugar. Sugar is made up of 50 percent glucose and 50 percent fructose. Honey is also made up mostly of sugar, but it’s only 30 percent glucose and less than 40 percent fructose. It contains other sugars and trace elements, which bees pick up while pollinating plants. It’s recommended that people with diabetes treat honey like any other added sugar, despite the possible health benefits associated with honey. The American Heart Association recommends limiting added sugars to no more than 6 teaspoons (2 tablespoons) for women and 9 teaspoons (3 tablespoons) for men. You should also count your carbs from honey and add them in to your daily limits. One tablespoon of honey has 17 grams of carbs. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Those with diabetes may feel like they are doomed to never again taste chocolate, or spoil themselves with a sweet dessert after a meal. The good news is, with a controlled diet, diabetics can still enjoy sweet things… as long as they are careful. Why does sugar affect diabetics? First of all, let's dispel the common myth that eating a lot of sugar can give you diabetes. This is well ‘known’ by most people. In fact, eating sugar has nothing to do with developing Type 1 diabetes. Genetics and other factors trigger the onset of the disease. Type 2 diabetes is slightly more complicated, with being overweight the biggest contributing factor. Of course a high intake of sugar adds to obesity, which can lead to diabetes, but the sugar itself is not directly responsible. Diabetes occurs when glucose levels in the blood are too high. This is a problem because most of the food we eat is turned into glucose for our body to burn as energy. The pancreas produces a hormone called insulin to help this transition from glucose to energy. In diabetics, the body either doesn’t produce insulin at all (Type 1), or can’t regulate the amount it produces (Type 2). Difference between honey and sugar When it comes to carbohydrates, there’s really not much difference between honey and sugar. However, this doesn’t tell the full story. Sugar is basically 100% sucrose, and has no nutritional value whatsoever. Honey on the other hand, contains many different vitamins and minerals, including zinc, iron, magnesium and potassium. Because of this, honey is sweeter than sugar, and so less is needed when cooking. Sugar is made up of fructose and glucose, two molecules which are bonded together to form sucrose. Our body needs to break this sucrose down before turning it into energy, but when i Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Honey?

Can A Diabetic Eat Honey?

Yes! Honey can be taken in moderation by an individual with Diabetes. I will briefly explain the scientific mechanism behind this. Keeping blood glucose levels under control is important for people with diabetes. Honey is a carb food as well, just like rice, potatoes, thus just keep in mind that 1 tablespoon of honey has approximately 17 grams of carbohydrate , and taking that into account when counting your total daily intake of carbohydrates, diabetics can work it out just like any other sweetener or carbohydrates. Both honey and sugar will affect your blood sugar level but Clinical studies have shown that pure honey is a healthier choice in diabetic diet than table sugar and any other non-nutritive sweeteners such as Splenda, saccharin, aspartame. Honey requires lower levels of insulin compared to regular white sugar and does not raise blood sugar levels as rapidly as table sugar, that is, it has a lower Glycemic Index than sugar. Honey facilitates glucose intake to the liver, hence preventing an overload of glucose entering the blood circulation. And nature's honey is the only sugar that possesses this special ability. Anyway you must consider that honey has more calorie than granulated sugar or sugar substitutes. One tablespoon of honey comes in at 68 calories, whereas 1 tablespoon of sugar contains 49 calories. So you can use raw honey instead other sugar substitutes but only in moderation. Be sure to count the carbohydrates in honey as part of your diabetes eating plan. List of Best and Worst Foods for individuals with Diabetes Download a free android app called 'Beat Diabetes' to get the latest list of Top 40 good and bad foods for Diabetes based on Glycemic Index. Continue reading >>

Raw Honey

Raw Honey

by Angela Ysseldyk, Nutritionist and Beekeeper's Daughter A common question I get is whether or not diabetics can consume honey. It has long been thought that honey should be severely limited (along with most sugars) by diabetics. But the science strongly indicates that this is not the case. Below I cover three studies on raw honey in diabetics, all of which show positive health benefits for those who consume honey. In the first study, scientists set out to investigate the effect of consuming honey with one of two common diabetes drugs - metformin or glibenclamide. Diabetic rats were randomized into six groups and administered distilled water, honey, glibenclamide, glibenclamide and honey, metformin or metformin and honey for four weeks. What the scientists found was that honey significantly increased insulin, decreased hyperglycemia and fructosamine (fructosamine are used to identify blood glucose concentration over time). Although the two drugs alone significantly reduced hyperglycemia, when they were combined with honey they produced significantly much lower blood glucose as compared to the drugs alone. Similarly, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly lower fructosamine levels whereas glibenclamide or metformin alone did not decrease fructosamine. Even more interesting was that glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey also significantly reduced the elevated levels of creatinine, bilirubin, triglycerides (blood fats), and VLDL cholesterol (VLDL cholesterol is considered a type of "bad" cholesterol because elevated levels are associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease). Wow. It seems counterintuitive that honey actually lowers blood sugar levels. But the science clearly shows that it does. And furthermore, it appe Continue reading >>

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