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Should Children With Diabetes Get The Flu Shot

Flu Vaccination. Type1 Child.

Flu Vaccination. Type1 Child.

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My little girls school offer the flu nasal spray every year. Never had any issues with it. My question is, now she's been diagnosed is she better with the injection or will the nasal spray be just as effective? I've read different opinions ie the injection although has more side effects is more effective than spray in those who's immune systems could be compromised. My GP had advised its really my choice but just wondered what others opinions/experiences are? Thanks I have no knowledge of the spray but I've had the injection every year for the last 25 years and other than a sore arm I've only ever had a bad reaction to it once, and that was about 22 years ago! My point is, if you do get advised to go for the injection, I wouldn't worry about her having it too much. A lot of the people that talk of side effects blame it for giving them flu symptoms but it's a myth - it's just that it's given at the time of year when there are lots of colds about and it's coincidence. Hope someone has some wise words on whether it's more effective or not for you Continue reading >>

Here's Why You Need To Get That Flu Shot Early

Here's Why You Need To Get That Flu Shot Early

Here's why you need to get that flu shot early People with diabetes, other chronic conditions andpeople over the age of 65 years can get their flu shot free fromtheir GPs. Queensland's influenza season starts in July, peaks inAugust and continues through September. Last year 19,736 people in Queensland had influenza - these areonly the ones who had a lab test. Click on picture to viewlarger image Think influenza only happens inolder people? This graph for Queensland influenza cases for 2016 indicates thepeak age is 30-39 years. nfluenza is a severe illness. Atthe peak of the season the number of people hospitalised inQueensland is over 300 per week with a proportion of theserequiring intensive care. Here is a series of videos thatanswer the most common questions about influenza andvaccination. The ability of our immune system to ward off influenza is loweredby diabetes. Diabetes places you at risk of influenza. UK NHS video -Diabetes: Protect yourself from fluthrough vaccination It's a very dangerous view. It's dangerous for you. It'sdangerous for the family. It's dangerous for the community. Answers to common questions about the Influenza vaccine byProfessor Paul Van Buynder, Chairman of the ImmunisationCoalition. I am healthy! Should I still get the flu shot? Living well won't prevent you from getting infected. Answers to common questions about the Influenza vaccine byProfessor Paul Van Buynder, Chairman of the ImmunisationCoalition. Influenza is much more serious - get vaccinated thisyear Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Flu Shots

Children With Diabetes - Flu Shots

Many people overlook the need for a flu shots, especially for their children. This doesn't mean that all children should get flu shots, but since children with diabetes are in one of the high risk groups, you should seriously consider flu vaccination. While flu symptoms are usually mild to moderate in most people, it can be more severe in the elderly or very young children. Like any illness, the flu can seriously disturb diabetes control, not uncommonly leading to prolonged hyperglycemia and DKA [diabetic ketoacidosis]. Conversely, uncontrolled diabetes can make the immune system more vulnerable to severe cases of "the flu" (influenza). Everybody with diabetes, of any age, should get this cheap and easy protection. Sometimes, a few days after the vaccine, you can develop some mild flu-like symptoms that don't lead to the serious complications seen with a full-blown flu infection when no vaccine is given. Thes mild symptoms, however, may increase blood sugars and may temporarily increase insulin requirements slightly for a few days. This year, flu vaccine is recommended for children over the age of six months. The first time they are vaccinated, children under the age of nine need two doses, at least a month apart in order to get a good response. Older and previously vaccinated only need a single annual injection. The vaccine itself is an inactivated or killed vaccine and is changed each year to keep up with the most common strains of the influenza virus that are circulating and most likely to cause infections. Side effects are usually mild, usually only last for 1-2 days, and the 'split virus' vaccine is associated with fewer side effects than the 'whole virus' variety. Flu vaccines are available at little or no cost at doctors' offices, clinics, pharmacies, grocery st Continue reading >>

Flu Vaccination And Diabetes

Flu Vaccination And Diabetes

The flu vaccine contains a non-active version of the flu virus People with diabetes in the UK are advised to receive free flu jabs on the NHS because of the increased risks of short term diabetes complications and an increased risk of pneumonia. The flu vaccination involves administering a non-active version of the flu virus into the body which stimulates immunity against the real flu virus. Benefits of receiving the flu vaccination There are a number of key benefits of being vaccinated against the flu: Protect yourself from symptoms and complications of the flu, which can be severe Reduce the risk of short term diabetes complications which are more likely to occur if you have the flu By protecting yourself against the flu, you will also prevent those around you from catching the flu from you The most common side effects of the flu shot are as follows: These side effects do not occur in everyone and the side effects are much less severe than the effects of the flu. More serious side effects are rare. The flu vaccine is available from October through to early November and therefore it is best to get vaccinated during this period. If you need to be vaccinated outside of this period, your health team will try to make this possible. When is the flu vaccination not recommended? The flu vaccine is not recommended if you have previously experienced an allergic reaction to the flu vaccine. If you have a high temperature or fever when the vaccination is due, your flu jab should be postponed until after your illness has passed . Note that colds and minor illnesses, however, should not affect whether you have the flu jab. If you have an egg allergy, you should receive either an egg free or low egg content flu vaccine. There are a number of different strains of flu which the seaso Continue reading >>

The Flu Shot & Kids

The Flu Shot & Kids

A flu vaccine is the best way to prevent your child from getting seriously sick this winter -- so why do so many parents blow it off? If you're thinking about skipping flu vaccination for your family this year, your child has probably never had influenza -- which can leave her coughing, feverish, and completely wiped out for a whole week. "Unfortunately, many parents consider the flu to be nothing more than a slightly nastier version of a cold. It's actually a very serious, potentially fatal illness," says Parents advisor Neal Halsey, MD, director of the Institute for Vaccine Safety at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, in Baltimore. Complications of the flu include pneumonia, antibiotic-resistant staph infections, and ear and sinus infections. Amazingly, only 18 percent of children ages 6 months to 2 years are vaccinated -- despite the fact that an estimated 20,000 children under the age of five with influenza need to be hospitalized each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Kids who have a chronic medical condition like asthma or diabetes are also at particular risk; they are five times more likely to be hospitalized than healthier children. The CDC now recommends that all children ages 6 months up to their 19th birthday get a seasonal flu vaccine. And if there's an infant in your family, it's important that all family members and caregivers be immunized. Taking your child to the pediatrician to get yet another shot is no fun, but neither is nursing a hacking, cranky kid or spending time at the hospital. Here's what you need to know about this important vaccine. Most people get immunized as soon as the vaccine is available in October or November, but your child can benefit from getting the shot as late as April. "Last Continue reading >>

What Is Influenza?

What Is Influenza?

People with diabetes are at high risk of serious flu complications. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated each year, and vaccinating the entire family. If you have diabetes, you are three times more likely to be hospitalised and three times more likely to die from the flu and its complications than other people. The flu may also interfere with your blood glucose levels. So prevent flu and get a flu shot! Influenza is highly contagious as the viruses are spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes small virus-containing droplets into the air. If you’re nearby, you can breathe them in and infect your respiratory tract. However, it’s important to remember that touching contaminated surfaces (including hands) and then touching your mouth, nose or eyes can also lead to infection. Influenza infection usually has different symptoms and causes a more severe illness than most other common viral respiratory infections and may be a life-threatening infection in certain people; it should not be confused with the common cold! Influenza, and its potential complications, can be very serious for people living with diabetes. The NHMRC recommends vaccination in adults and children older than 6 months with chronic pulmonary or circulatory disease, including severe asthma, and other chronic illness that require regular medical follow-up or hospitalisation in the preceding year. People living with diabetes need to get vaccinated– it could save their lives and will ensure they are protected when others bring the infection into their workplaces or social environment. People who work with or live with people who are at risk of complications, such as people living with diabetes, should also be immunised to avoid spreading the flu. People can unknowingly infect othe Continue reading >>

Diabetes - The Flu Vaccine What To Do? Blood Sugar Trampoline

Diabetes - The Flu Vaccine What To Do? Blood Sugar Trampoline

Every year, around this time, I have a conversation with myself about whether or not I should get the flu vaccine. And every year I make a different decision. Two signs of insanity right there; talking to myself and complete indecision. Whose worried? Not me! Oops, there I go again, talking to myself. Should everyone with diabetes get the flu vaccines? Well that is completely totally up to you. So far, I've only gotten it once and that was the winter I was pregnant with my now 13 year old daughter. Since then, I maintained that if it's not broke don't fix it and I never get flu so I didn't bother. Except last year, I had clocked up one or two flus that knocked me out for a week at a time, I decided that I was going to get it. However, when I went to my GP, I already had a cold and decided to wait but then never got around to it. I'm not sick very often so I figure the odds are still on my side. I do know as I approach 65 I will decide that I'm better off vaccinated. This year I'm still undecided but maybe swaying towards the I will side. If you are like me and still thinking will I, won't I, here's some additional information for about it IS THE FLU VACCINE FREE FOR PEOPLE WITH DIABETES? Yes and No because nothing is ever straight forward in our health system. Yes, the flu vaccine itself is free to everyone in the At Risk groups which includes people with diabetes. No, because if you do not have a medical card, a GP services card or a HAA card, you will have to pay for someone tojab it in. A lot of pharmacy chains offer the flu vaccine so you do have the option to walk into one of those and have it done there and then without making an appointment. Next time you are collecting your diabetes supplies you can ask. It's also worth mentioning that the HSE have also launche Continue reading >>

Flu And People With Diabetes

Flu And People With Diabetes

People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2), even when well-managed, are at high risk of serious flu complications, often resulting in hospitalization and sometimes even death. Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications. The flu also can make chronic health problems, like diabetes, worse. This is because diabetes can make the immune system less able to fight infections. In addition, illness can make it harder to control your blood sugar. The illness might raise your sugar but sometimes people don’t feel like eating when they are sick, and this can cause blood sugar levels to fall. So it is important to follow the sick day guidelines for people with diabetes. Vaccination is the Best Protection against Flu CDC recommends that all people who are 6 months and older get a flu vaccine. It is especially important for people with diabetes to get a flu vaccine. Flu shots are approved for use in people with diabetes and other health conditions. The flu shot has a long, established safety record in people with diabetes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia because of the flu, so being up to date with pneumococcal vaccination is also recommended. Pneumococcal vaccination should be part of a diabetes management plan. Talk to your doctor to find out which pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for you. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing and throw the tissue away after using it; Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing; Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth (germs are spread that way); and Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care. If you are sick with flu-like symptoms you should sta Continue reading >>

Diabetes Patients Should Get Flu Shots, Not Nasal Spray

Diabetes Patients Should Get Flu Shots, Not Nasal Spray

Diabetes Patients Should Get Flu Shots, Not Nasal Spray As the flu season approaches in the Northern Hemisphere, medical professionals, government agencies, and others are reminding physicians and patients that those with diabetes should get vaccinated ideally with shots, rather than the nasal-spray flu vaccine, for safety reasons. "Diabetes can weaken your immune system against the flu, and it also puts you at risk of flu-related complications," cautions Fernando Ovalle, MD, at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical School, in a statement from his institution . For physicians, Medscape has a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) expert commentary on the 20132014 influenza season, and WebMD has a page for consumers devoted to diabetes and the flu . Diabetic patients should also constantly track their glucose levels if they become ill, because these can be adversely affected by sickness. The American Diabetes Association, for example, suggests checking glucose levels every 3 to 4 hours and adjusting insulin levels accordingly. Higher blood sugar levels can increase the risk for complications in diabetes, particularly short-term ones such as ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). And diabetic patients are also at risk for flu-related complications like pneumonia, says Dr. Ovalle, who also recommends that doctors talk to their diabetes patients about pneumococcal vaccines. Recently released estimates show that although more Americans are getting vaccinated against flu than ever, at just over 40%, the rates could be even better. Physicians, at least, set a good example, with more than 90% of doctors getting immunized. Send comments and news tips to [email protected] . Cite this article: Larry Hand.Diabetes Patients Should Get Flu Shots Continue reading >>

Should I Get A Flu Shot If I Have Diabetes?

Should I Get A Flu Shot If I Have Diabetes?

Having type 1 or type 2 diabetes puts you at increased risk of illness because elevated blood sugar weakens the immune system. Getting an annual flu shot is the best way to protect yourself. Fall is here, and that means that along with pumpkins and hay rides, it’s influenza (flu) season—which can last until May. For those with diabetes, flu isn’t just a drag: It can result in hospitalization, and occasionally even death. Fortunately, a vaccine can slash your risk of the illness by an estimated 40-60%, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The flu shot also lowers your chances of hospitalization, which is most common in flu patients with chronic conditions like diabetes. The vaccine can also “prevent major respiratory infections during the flu season,” says Kavita Seetharaman, MD, staff physician at Joslin Diabetes Center, a Boston-based non-profit affiliated with Harvard Medical School. Why Is the Flu So Dangerous for People with Diabetes? “As with any other infection, the flu virus can cause inflammation, congestion, and mucus production in the respiratory tract,” as well as cough, fever, and even breathing difficulties, Dr. Seetharaman says. But for diabetes patients, there’s another risk. “When patients with diabetes are not feeling well,” due to illness, infection, or injury, “they can become more insulin resistant. Blood sugar rises [even if patients aren’t eating], and ketones can develop,” she explains. Ketones are chemicals that are produced when there’s not enough glucose (sugar) to fuel the metabolism; the presence of ketones (which can be detected with over-the-counter test strips) indicate that the body is using fat for energy. Patients with diabetes can accumulate ketones in the blood, which can make Continue reading >>

Should People With Diabetes Get A Flu Shot?

Should People With Diabetes Get A Flu Shot?

Should People with Diabetes Get a Flu Shot? What is flu anyway? Flu is influenza , an infectious disease that spreads from person to person. Symptoms are chiils and fever, muscle pain, sore throat, headache, coughing, weakness and fatigue and general discomfort. In some children, flu may have nausea and vomiting accompanying, but most often that is not a classic symptom of influenza. Many people confuse the stomach bug, gastroenteritis a 24 hour wipe your insides out kinda bug, which is unrelated to influenza. Historically, one of the most horrific flu epidemics was Spanish flu of 1918. It was a particularly virulent and lethal pandemic, coming in three waves starting in 1918, 1919, ending in 1920, and its spread was amplified through troop movements and global transportation. Spanish flu was estimated to have killed 40 million people in Europe, with some scientists estimating 100 million globally. In the US, Spanish flu affected twenty five percent of the population, but more remarkably, in only one year the average life expectancy in the U.S. dropped by 12%. The flu usually killed the very young and the very old, but this virus strain attacked teens and young adults with robust immune systems. Immune cells were activated by the virus, increasing the number of immune cells circulating in the blood and overwhelming the lungs with fluids. Healthy young adults essentially drowned from within. Patients would turn blue, suffocating from a lack of oxygen as their lungs filled with a frothy, bloody substance. Some patients died only a few hours after their first symptoms appeared; others died in a matter of days. Anyone watching Downton Abbey remembers the episode when the house comes down with Spanish flu. Flu vaccine is always controversial in a complimentary medicine prac Continue reading >>

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

(HealthDay)—With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people—particularly those with diabetes—to get vaccinated. Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained. However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications. "Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an excellent way of reducing the risk of getting sick," certified diabetes educator Evan Sisson said in an AADE news release. "It's widely available, it takes just a few minutes and it can make a real difference in your health." Good hand hygiene is another important way to stay healthy and hopefully avoid the flu, the diabetes experts noted. There are several ways a seasonal flu shot can benefit people with diabetes, according to the AADE. They include: Better disease management. The flu and other infections can raise blood sugar levels and disrupt a healthy diet plan. Avoiding the flu can help people with diabetes stay on track and manage the condition. Complication prevention. People with diabetes are more likely to be hospitalized for flu-related complications, such as pneumonia. They are also more likely to die from the flu. Immune system boost. As people age, their immune system weakens. The flu can tax Continue reading >>

Flu Shot & Diabetes | Joslin Diabetes Center

Flu Shot & Diabetes | Joslin Diabetes Center

Each year people with diabetes are offered flu vaccinations. Should you get an annual flu shot if you have diabetes? Everyone with diabetes over the age of six months. People who are allergic to eggs (they are used in the production of the vaccine). A yearly flu shot is highly recommended if you have diabetes, according to M. Donna Younger, MD, at Joslin Diabetes Center. Diabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting the flu, particularly if your diabetes is not well controlled. Having the flu also makes it more difficult to manage diabetes. Its important to get a flu shot when you have diabetes, so you can reduce the risk. The flu vaccine is 70-90 percent effective and takes two weeks after the shot for your immunity to build up. Its a triple vaccine against three types of influenza strains that public health officials predict are most likely to strike in a given flu season. The flu shot is effective for about six months. Cases of flu usually peak in January or February, but you can still get infected any time up until May. Although it is recommended you get the vaccine as soon as it is available in the fall, even January is not too late. Should you get the flu when you have diabetesbefore you get thevaccine or despite it, Younger recommends that you contact your primary care provider right away. There are also other treatments for the flu, but they arent as effective as getting the vaccine. Tamiflu, for example, has to be taken in first 48 hours and continued for a week. In order to be prepared, you should also have a sick day plan made with your health care team. We also encourage others in your family over six months years old to get the vaccine as well, so the flu is not passed around the house, Younger says. Prepare yourself for theflu season and get your vaccine Continue reading >>

Did The Flu Shot Cause My Daughter's Diabetes? | Ask D'mine

Did The Flu Shot Cause My Daughter's Diabetes? | Ask D'mine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Got questions about life with diabetes? So do we! That's why we offer our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1 peep W il Dubois , a diabetes author with many years' experience as an educator in a New Mexico clinic. This week, Wil is taking on one of those questions about whether vaccines -- the flu shot specifically -- might have led to diabetes. Well, we guess in this day and age of anti-vaccine scares, it's worth addressing this particularly long question head-on. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected] } Gerry, D-mom from California, writes: My9-year-old daughter Ruby has been newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Thisdiagnosis has come completely out of the blue to us. We are a healthy family, one that doesnt eat junk food or ready meals, doesn't drink lots of sugary drinks,and there is no family history on either of the parents sides. We dont takeunnecessary medications, preferring a more holistic approach. Our consultant told us that the medicalprofession doesnt really know why T1 can suddenly start in juveniles, exceptto say that they think it is virus-related. I have a suspicion, though, whichis shared by my ex-husband.My daughters school was taking part in aprogram of vaccinating children under 11 against the flu virus toward the endof last year in November, and my daughter was given the fluvaccine via a nose spray. She didnt immediately appear to have a cold ortemperature but then shortly after began to complain of the occasional headacheor tummy ache. In the new year she had an increasedthirst and was weeing a lot more than usual, and saying she had a sore Continue reading >>

The Truth About Flu Shots

The Truth About Flu Shots

**Editors Note: This article is based on current recommendations and research from the CDC . We encourage everyone to consult their doctor whenmaking personal health decisions. I got my flu shot in a Target CVS this year. I went in to pick up my insulin from the pharmacy, and when the pharmacist asked if Id like to get a flu shot I agreed. Id been meaning to anyway. Within 2 minutes Id filled out the necessary paperwork and she gave me the injection. Unfortunately, she hit a vein when she took the needle out, blood was dripping down my arm right in the middle of a public area of Target. The pharmacist was embarrassed and worried that Id be upset, but with 15 years as a Type 1 diabetic under my belt, this felt like a pretty average day. I laughed, thanked her, and left with a $5 gift card. A win-win, because I know how important it is to get a flu shot as a T1D. No doubt, your healthcare professional has urged you to get a flu vaccine. In the United States, flu vaccines are recommended for everyone over 6 months old but if you have diabetes, getting vaccinated is especially important ( CDC ). Dr. Marina Basina, an endocrinologist at Stanford explains that If a person with diabetes gets the flu, it becomes much more difficult to manage blood sugars any infection will elevate blood sugars and increase variability in the readings and resistance to insulin. On the other hand, fevers, sweats and poor appetite may lead to low blood sugars, or ketone formation even in the setting of normal blood sugars. Furthermore, DKA is more frequent in the setting of flu even when blood sugars are not significantly elevated. Flu shots are a safe, inexpensive and effective way to lower your risk ofgetting sick. One study found that flu vaccination is associated with a 79% lower rate of hosp Continue reading >>

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