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Short Term Disability Diabetes

Short Tem Disability And Leave Of Absence From Work

Short Tem Disability And Leave Of Absence From Work

Short tem disability and leave of absence from work Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Short tem disability and leave of absence from work This is the first time ever in my life where I felt like "not working". Since the hospital scare, I have been out of work for about 3 weeks. I filed for short term disability due to the unstable bs and the met made me sick and I have super blurry vision. For a few days, my number were looking great, then out of the blue...eating the same food, my numbers took off like a rocket. I feel terrible but I know I must return to work. It is better to stay home than to go and can't work. Well, I have been waiting for an answer on whether my diabetes qualified me for short term disability. I was afraid to drive due to my vision and other problems. Who has experience with short term disability. I have called repeatedly and no one can give me a clear answer. If I got back too soon, then that is a brand new claim and more stress. Sorry you're having such a rough go of it. Can't help with the disability question. I went back to work the day after I got out of the hospital and, like you, was feeling pretty awful. I just powered through it, wore two pair of reading glasses because my vision was so blurry, and somehow made it through that first terrible week. It got easier after that. My vision cleared up within about five weeks and once I got my insulin doses sorted out I felt a lot better. For me it was better to work, even at a slow pace, than to be at home fretting; I was afraid I'd be throwing a long term pity party for myself, so any activity was better than none :T! Thank for the great advice. For fl Continue reading >>

Obtaining Insurance For Diabetics By Steve Crawford

Obtaining Insurance For Diabetics By Steve Crawford

Four years ago when somebody told me they were a diabetic, I referred them to Fidelity Security, Boston Mutual, or Oxford Life. After all, they are the carriers who will take people with a dreaded disease like diabetes. I knew that in the underwriting manual it stated the insurance company could consider somebody with diabetes for a modified contract, however all the applications I had seen come in on people with the disease generally got declined. In 2000, I got diagnosed with the disease myself, and my understanding of what an insurance company looks for when they underwrite people with diabetes increased. This article is written for both people with the disease, and for agents looking to learn a bit more about how to help their diabetic clients obtain income protection. If you read this and get only one thing out of it, understand that obtaining disability insurance for diabetics is not easy. However if the agent and the client are both willing to put the time and effort into it, and are prepared to handle a few rejections, you can come out in the end with a solid contract. I don't remember the source, however I think it was WebMD, that reported 1 in 3 children inside the USA will get diabetes during their lifetime. If that doesn't signify an epidemic I don't know what does. This is the first article I have ever written where I placed a picture of myself on the article, I did so on this one because I wanted people to see I don't represent the normal stereotype of a diabetic. I'm not overweight, and am not over 40, I got diagnosed three years after playing varsity sports in college. What is the game plan? The plan at the beginning should be to start at the top, and work your way down the chain. The game plan should not be to apply with several carriers at once, and se Continue reading >>

Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Ii) | Diabetic Neuropathy

Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Ii) | Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin to process glucose, which results in excessive amounts of glucose in the blood and urine, excessive thirst, and weight loss. In some cases, there is a progressive destruction of small blood vessels which leads to such complications as diabetic neuropathy, infections and gangrene of the limbs, or blindness. Diabetes can often be controlled with medication and a proper diet. However, as a person ages, sometimes diabetes cannot be controlled. This is a problem as uncontrolled diabetes can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both Type I Diabetes and Type II Diabetes include: frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. Individuals with type 2 diabetes also can experience numbness and tingling in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Potential Complications Complications from diabetes may include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) heart disease stroke gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and depression. Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been unable to work for at least 12 months, or you expect that you will not be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (aka SSDI or SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. To qualify for disability benefits, you must be able t Continue reading >>

Contribution Of Hypoglycemia To Medical Care Expenditures And Short-term Disability In Employees With Diabetes.

Contribution Of Hypoglycemia To Medical Care Expenditures And Short-term Disability In Employees With Diabetes.

Contribution of hypoglycemia to medical care expenditures and short-term disability in employees with diabetes. School of Public Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey, USA. Diabetes is the third-most expensive physical health condition among US employees. We sought to evaluate the contribution of hypoglycemia to these costs. We studied 2664 employees using insulin for whom medical encounters and short-term disability (STD) records were available. Among these employees, 442 (16.6%) had a diagnosis of hypoglycemia during an average follow-up of 2.5 years. The risk of hospitalization and emergency room visits was increased twofold in this group. Much of this excess was associated with hypoglycemia. The annualized medical cost of hypoglycemia was $3241. Patients with hypoglycemia had 77% more STD days annually. The risk of STD in the week after hypoglycemia was increased fivefold. These data suggest that hypoglycemia contributes substantially to medical care utilization and to disability-related work absence among employees using insulin. Continue reading >>

Getting Disability Benefits For Diabetes

Getting Disability Benefits For Diabetes

An individual may qualify for Social Security disability benefits based on uncontrolled diabetes or related symptoms like peripheral neuropathy or poor vision. While diabetes that is well-controlled with medication won't form the basis of a successful claim on its own, most disability applicants with diabetes also suffer from other medical problems that limit their ability to work. When filing for disability benefits for diabetes, it's important to list all your symptoms and diagnoses, even those unrelated to your diabetes. Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic medical condition marked by an inability to process glucose in the blood. When the pancreas fails to produce sufficient amounts of the hormone insulin, which sends signals to other body cells to absorb excess glucose, blood sugar levels rise. Elevated blood sugar levels often can be controlled through medication and diet, but persistently high blood sugar levels may give rise to neuropathy (nerve damage) causing numbness, burning, and tingling in the extremities. Other complications of diabetes include cardiovascular disease, kidney problems, skin infections, and visual changes. Type 1 diabetes, often referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, typically manifests in childhood and requires daily insulin injections and monitoring of blood sugar levels. Individuals with Type 1 diabetes are unable to produce the insulin which regulates blood sugar levels. Only about five to ten percent of diabetic individuals suffer from Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, also called adult-onset diabetes, occurs when the body's cells become resistant to insulin and thus fail to process sufficient amounts of glucose. Type 2 diabetes is most common in those over 45, and it is strongly associated with o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Disability Insurance Claim Help And Information

Diabetes Disability Insurance Claim Help And Information

Diabetes Disability Insurance Claim Help and Information An estimated 24 million children and adults in the United States, and 240 million people worldwide, have diabetes. Most people with diabetes can manage it by taking medication and carefully monitoring what they eat. In some cases, though, diabetes can lead to debilitating illnesses, injuries and disabilities that prevent you from maintaining a consistent work schedule. In most long term disability cases diabetes is associated with additional medical illnesses which prevent a person from being able to work. Our disability insurance lawyers have represented numerous claimants with uncontrolled diabetes. Disability insurance companies are quick to argue that diabetes disability claims should only be short term and not long term disability claims. Another argument is that the claimant has been working with diabetes for years so why now do they claim they cannot work. We help our clients deal with these unreasonable insurance company arguments on a daily basis. If you suspect that a diabetes complication will prevent you from working a consistent job, or if your provider already denied your individual claim or group policy claim, contact our office. We can help you fill out the application for benefits or appeal a denial. I Have Diabetes Do I Qualify for Disability Insurance Benefits? Diabetes by itself will likely not qualify you for disability benefits unless it is uncontrolled. Your disability company will want to see a lot of evidence that you are incapable of providing a continuous work schedule. If your diabetes progresses to the point where you can no longer perform your job functions or similar job functions, then you will likely qualifying for disability insurance benefits. We will work closely with your doct Continue reading >>

Does Short-term Disability Cover Pre-existing Conditions

Does Short-term Disability Cover Pre-existing Conditions

Read more about maternity coverage here . The policy will cover future accidents, illnesses, and your next conception but not your existing pregnancy. Expect to find specific limitations language similar to this. We will not pay benefits for normal labor and delivery, including Cesarean in which conception occurred prior to the 30th day after the effective date. Complications of pregnancy will be covered to the same extent as any other covered sickness. As you will soon read, any other covered sickness is excluded if the loss begins during the first 12-months of the policy effective date. Every gestation resolves itself about 3 months shy of this critical limitation date. Applying for Benefits with Pre-Existing Health Conditions Applying for short-term disability insurance benefits to cover a pre-existing health condition occasionally works. Of course, the information in this section pertains only to those readers who have an active policy already in force. This means you completed an application form, answered the medical questions, and the company agreed to issue the contract before you file a claim. Read the policy exclusion period legal wording to determine if the issuing company is likely to approve or deny your claim for benefits. The short-term disability pre-existing condition exclusion period legal language determines when you can file a claim for benefits. In most cases, you can file when the loss begins 12 months after the coverage effective date. Patients with pending elective surgeries sometimes find the timing constraints acceptable. Here is a sample exclusion period legal clause . You may find a similar statement in your contract. Read your outline of coverage carefully. Look for a similar two-part prohibition. If you become disabled because of a pre-exi Continue reading >>

How To Prove Diabetic Neuropathy Qualifies For Disability Insurance Benefits

How To Prove Diabetic Neuropathy Qualifies For Disability Insurance Benefits

How Do You Prove Diabetic Neuropathy Qualifies You For Disability Insurance Benefits? Almost 26 million children and adults in the US have Type 2 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association, and many of these people also suffer from peripheral neuropathy as a result of diabetes-related nerve damage. Neuropathy may become increasingly severe over time, causing pain, numbness, and weakness in the hands, feet, or other parts of the body, and eventually compromise an individual’s ability to work and complete normal daily activities. If neuropathy makes it impossible for you to continue completing the normal functions of your job, you will likely need to apply for disability benefits and prove that this disability is legitimately preventing you from working. The following forms of documentation will help you prove your case and receive the benefits that you need to support yourself. Medical records. The most obvious evidence you will need is your complete medical history, including a neurologist’s diagnosis of your peripheral neuropathy based on testing such as MRIs, a nerve biopsy, blood tests, nerve conduction tests, or a spinal tap. Documentation of treatment. Presenting an initial diagnosis of your peripheral neuropathy is generally not enough in a long term disability case; you need to prove that you’ve continued the recommended course of treatment. If you cannot prove that you’ve received regular treatment from a neurologist or other medical provider, your claim may be denied. Log of daily activities. In order to prove that you can no longer work in the capacity that you used to, you need to prove that your neuropathy hinders your completion of basic day-to-day activities. The most straightforward way to do this is tracking how long it takes you a Continue reading >>

Short Term Disabililty Denial

Short Term Disabililty Denial

My question involves labor and employment law for the state of: South Carolina Hello. I recently applied for Short Term Disability at my job. I was denied because I have Type 1 diabetes and on Insulin. I contacted the company and asked what I could do to get approved. They said they would take it to their underwriting team. I have offered to get my endocrinologist to send a letter stating that I was healthy with no major complications from diabetes. The letter has not been sent yet, but my MD is working on it and will send in the next couple of days. I recently received a call from the local representative for this company saying that: I would be denied due to my diabetes and that it would be discriminating against the underwriters to approve my application. The local rep said I should be getting something in the mail/email stating this; I'm still waiting on formal documentation that I was denied. I feel I am being discriminated against because I have type 1 diabetes that is controlled. I have been willing to work with the company and provide documentation of my health. What rights do I have and can the short term disability company deny me simply because I have type 1 diabetes and on insulin? Continue reading >>

Diabetes Discussion Boards - Joslin Diabetes Center

Diabetes Discussion Boards - Joslin Diabetes Center

I have a question and not sure if anyone here has any thoughts. I'm at the stage of my life now where I'm thinking about pregnancy. My work does not offer maternity leave, they do offer 6 weeks where you won't lose your job, but there is no monetary compensation. They recently brought Aflac aboard andI am noteligible for STD, which would cover my maternity leave, because I am a diabetic taking insulin. Is anyone aware of a supplimental insurance that would offer people with pre-existing condtions coverage? Or am I screwed? This is very frustrating. This is one of the things Obama wants to change with the health care reform, i.e. eliminate the prior condition clause in private insurance coverage. Are you saying that the insurance you have where you work doesn't cover pregnancy? I don't think the family leave act (the 6 weeks without pay) would prevent you for using COBRA to cover you during the leave period. Although, I thought the FLA required companies to continue insurance coverage even if they don't pay your salary while on leave. (Note: I just checked and the Family Leave and Maternity Act does require an employer to provide continuing medical coverage while the employee is on leave. So if you have insurance you should be covered unless it specifically excludes pregnancy.) P.S. Good to see you on the board again Ehrin! I think you need to get a legal opinion here. First of all the FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) provides for 12 weeks of unpaid leave during which time your job is protected. I do not understand why you would not be eligible for STD as a diabetic on insulin either. I am currently on Long Term Disability and was on Extended Sick Leave prior to that. In our company ESL was accumulated weekly and was to be used like STD after you had been out of work for Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Diabetes happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to process glucose. Diabetes can often be controlled with treatment -- a combination of medication and diet. As a person gets older, sometimes diabetes can't be controlled, and then it can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 include frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. People with type 2 diabetes also can suffer from tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Complications from diabetes include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least 12 months, or you expect that you won't be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. But to qualify for disability benefits, the damage caused by your diabetes must severely limit what you can do, or you must have complications that fulfill the requirements of one of Social Security's disability listings. If your diabetes is uncontrolled because you don't follow your doctor's prescribed treatment, you won't be eligible for disability. For more information, see our article on failing to comply with treatmen Continue reading >>

Getting Disability Benefits: Do I Need An Attorney?

Getting Disability Benefits: Do I Need An Attorney?

Getting Disability Benefits: Do I Need an Attorney? When a chronic illness like diabetes reaches a stage where it is difficult for you to continue to work, there are other options. This article discusses three options that, hopefully, may be available to you to replace your lost income. It goes without saying that the decision to stop working will be one of the most difficult, and emotionally charged, you will ever have to make. If youre like most adult Americans, your work has helped you define who you are and has given added meaning to your life. Youve always worked, always been self-supporting, always helped support your family, and always paid your own way. Not working has never been an acceptable alternative in your way of life. However, when your doctors tell you that if you continue to work, you may be placing yourself at physical and/or mental risk, its time to make some decisions. This article will help you understand what disability benefits programs are available, how they work, and how you can make them work for you. -- Learn More About Diabetes and Money Matters >> There are three main disability benefit programs that can provide you with income when you are unable to work. Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). A fourth program, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), is designed for people with limited income and resources. STD insurance is most often purchased as group insurance by employers. The employers may pay the whole cost, or their employees may pay some of it through payroll deductions. Different STD programs provide different benefits. But all are designed to pay a percentage of your salary if you are not able to work for a short period of time because of illness or injury (excluding on-the-job injuries, which are covered by workers compensat Continue reading >>

Disabling Neuropathy

Disabling Neuropathy

As type II diabetes becomes more and more common, many people suffer from peripheral neuropathy , which is a result of nerve damage. Neuropathy may cause weakness, pain, or numbness in the hands and feet, although it may occur in other parts of the body. Sometimes this nerve damage becomes so severe that it prevents people from maintaining their normal lifestyle, including the ability to work. If neuropathy forces someone to stop working and they apply for disability benefits, there are some important tips to help document the disability. First, establishing treatment with a neurologist is very important. A Neurologist is the appropriate specialist to diagnose and treat neuropathy. If a person does not properly document their neuropathy, they will face a tough challenge in having their disability claim approved. Diagnosis requires considering full medical history, neurological examination (such as checking reflexes, sensation, and coordination), physical examination, and appropriate testing. The testing most commonly used for diagnosing neuropathy includes electromyography, nerve conduction tests, nerve biopsy or skin biopsy, blood tests, MRIs or other medical imaging tests, and lumbar puncture (or spinal tap). Second, it is necessary for the disability claimant to maintain regular treatment with their neurologist and other medical care providers. If it is shown that the disabled person has not complied with recommended treatment, then disability benefits may be denied. Third, a person applying for disability benefits will want to document how their neuropathy is affecting their everyday functioning. This includes their ability to do household chores like cooking and cleaning, and the ability to shop, shower, and dress. If the person applying for disability benefits pr Continue reading >>

The Rise In Pregnancy Disability Regulations

The Rise In Pregnancy Disability Regulations

The Rise in Pregnancy Disability Regulations Disability claims are always challenging for employers, but this is especially the case when pregnant workers suffer complications that leave them unable to perform their normal job duties. For example, in one recent case, a pregnant Kansas retail worker was fired because she needed, in violation of company policy, to carry a water bottle in order to stay hydrated. In another case, a delivery truck driver in Maryland was forced on unpaid leave when her doctor recommended lifting restrictions. As a result of such cases, there have been calls for increased legislation. For example, the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act was recently introduced in the US House of Representatives. This act would require employers to make reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers and prevent employers from requiring pregnant women to take leave when they could continue working with reasonable accommodations. "When American families are struggling to make ends meet, we must do everything we can to keep people in their jobs", said Congressman Jerry Nadler (D-NY), one of the congressmen to introduce the proposed legislation. "Ensuring that a woman who needs minor and reasonable job adjustments to maintain a healthy pregnancy gets that accommodation should be central to our society's support for strong and stable families." Not only is federal legislation increasingly expanding to cover pregnant workers who claim temporary disabilities, a growing number of state laws specifically ensure employee rights for pregnancy-related disabilities. In order to treat employees with pregnancy-related disabilities fairly and legally, employers need to understand the laws that impact their companies, how those laws intersect with existing company policies, and what Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circulation. Symptoms The presence of Diabetes is generally indicated by some combination of several symptoms. A diabetic will often experience unexplained: frequent need to urinate, especially if it is combined with extreme thirst, chronic hunger, especially between meals, fatigue, weight loss, and/or general feelings of irritability Many diabetics report dry, itchy skin and trouble with genital itching and fungal infections. A tingling sensation or numbness in the feet is another indication, as is blurred vision. Finally, the skin of many diabetics is slow to heal from wounds, skin abrasions, or so Continue reading >>

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