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Sexy Diabetic

2 Sexy Hotwife Stories (2017) Web-dl Split Scenes –

2 Sexy Hotwife Stories (2017) Web-dl Split Scenes –

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Better Sex With Diabetes

Better Sex With Diabetes

WebMD Feature Reviewed by Michael Dansinger, MD Diabetes doesn't have to feel like a third -- and unwanted -- party in bed. You can deal with things like low blood sugar, vaginal dryness, or erection problems by looking at them as hurdles you can overcome, instead of roadblocks that put a stop to sex. Planning ahead can ease some of the challenges. You may associate prep work more with house painting than with having sex, but it can make intimacy more relaxed. Also remember that taking good care of your diabetes is the No. 1 way to prevent or limit sexual issues with diabetes. These tricks and tips can also make sex easier and more fun. 10 Strategies for Better Sex Approach sex like exercise. This helps prevent dreaded blood sugar lows. "Hypoglycemic events during sex are a real buzzkill," says Kerri Morrone Sparling, the author of Balancing Diabetes: Conversations About Finding Happiness and Living Well, who blogs about her life with type 1 diabetes. "Your body just shuts down during a low, so it crushes the enjoyment." If you use insulin, check your blood sugar before sex and have a snack if it's low. For more fun, incorporate snacks into foreplay. Try strawberries or a little ice cream or chocolate. Just go with it. Planning can be helpful, but don't sweat it if sex just happens. "There's no reason not to grab the opportunity if it pops up just because you haven't followed your diabetes exercise routine," says Scott K. Johnson, a diabetes advocate who blogs about his life with type 1 diabetes. Just check your glucose level after. Use a lubricant. If you are a woman with vaginal dryness, a vaginal lubricant can make sex feel better. Ask your doctor about using one regularly, not just during sex. "Think of it like hand cream," says Janis Roszler, a diabetes educator in Continue reading >>

Studying Abroad With Diabetes

Studying Abroad With Diabetes

Studying Abroad With Diabetes By: Maria Sweezy (Sugarfree & Sexy Blog) This past January, I packed my bags full of my most essential articles of clothing (not enough socks as I later realized), a travel journal, and over three months worth of diabetes supplies and boarded a plane for Florence, Italy. I was surrounded by exclamations that I was about to experience “the opportunity of a lifetime” and that my “life will be forever changed.” Studying abroad is a big deal. It is an even bigger deal for someone with diabetes. I spent months leading up to my trip on the phone with insurance people, both my current and past doctors, my mom, and my pharmacy. I felt like I left America in a bold attempt at looking like I had my shit together, deep down being fully aware that I had no idea what I was getting myself into. I have fallen in love with Florence, Italy…as one does. I have never felt so at home in a place in my entire life. My heart sings with joy every time I can sit down in Caffe Notte with a cappuccino and write for this blog, or skip across Ponte Vecchio on my way to class. I sometimes feel as if I could stay here forever. As wonderful as this time has been, diabetes has also been her usual self. Following me around everywhere I go. Being abroad, diabetes has left me feeling impossibly alone in ways that I honestly wasn’t prepared for. Although in my day to day life back home in America I am usually the only person I encounter that has diabetes, I have carefully and meticulously built up a safety net around me. I have a support system. I would spend evenings with a boyfriend who knew a great deal about diabetes from witnessing it first hand and also independent research (bless his heart). I would be at work with coworkers who I disclosed small bits of my Continue reading >>

Get Sleek, Toned Arms: 4 Simple Moves

Get Sleek, Toned Arms: 4 Simple Moves

Want sleek, sexy arms that are short-sleeve-ready? Target your triceps and biceps with our easy workout that doesn’t require any special equipment. Spend just 10 minutes three times a week doing this easy arm-toning routine! Want sleek, sexy arms that are short-sleeve-ready? Target your triceps and biceps with our easy workout that doesn’t require any special equipment. Spend just 10 minutes three times a week doing this easy arm-toning routine! Want sleek, sexy arms that are short-sleeve-ready? Target your triceps and biceps with our easy workout that doesn’t require any special equipment. Spend just 10 minutes three times a week doing this easy arm-toning routine! Want sleek, sexy arms that are short-sleeve-ready? Target your triceps and biceps with our easy workout that doesn’t require any special equipment. Spend just 10 minutes three times a week doing this easy arm-toning routine! Want sleek, sexy arms that are short-sleeve-ready? Target your triceps and biceps with our easy workout that doesn’t require any special equipment. Spend just 10 minutes three times a week doing this easy arm-toning routine! Continue reading >>

Tethered To The Body

Tethered To The Body

A $6,000 insulin pump with an on-board computer chip is not alluring. Neither is the white mesh adhesive patch on my naked abdomen or the length of nylon tubing that connects the patch to the pump. There is only illness, and there is no way to make that sexy. After several years as a medical device wearer, I know. Negligees and nudity are impractical, because neither provides much to clip the device to. Clothes and pajamas, on the other hand, have waistbands or pockets, which keep the pump steady during the prelude of kissing and touching. The pump can even be negotiated during the impatient slithering of fingers into nightclothes. If my husband and I lie on our sides, front-to-front, I can clip my pump against my hip. If I’m on my back and Jimmy wants to lay his full length on top of me, I adjust the pump along my waistband toward my back, so the hard case doesn’t press into his abdomen. At some point, somehow, the clothes need to come off. We are cautious around the pump and its accoutrements. I am the more adept at this task. Most of the time Jimmy’s hands know to work around the white adhesive patch and hard plastic connector button that marks the tender insertion site, but sometimes they stutter and miss and fingers drag at it, reminding me. Although we are both aroused, I cannot be completely caught up in the moment, because I’m calculating what to do with the pump and when. I can remove the device for up to 60 minutes without bringing harm to myself, but then I have to remember to stay awake or get Jimmy to function as a human alarm clock and remind me, if I doze off, to reconnect. If I’m tired and know that I’ll want to finish soon and then fall into a long stretch of sleep, I might leave the pump connected during sex, the device tucked under a pillo Continue reading >>

On Verge Of Triggering Coma

On Verge Of Triggering Coma

Diabetic Emergency Rob Kardashian was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis ... this according to our Kardashian sources. TMZ broke the story ... Rob was taken to an L.A. hospital Sunday after feeling terrible all weekend. Our sources say after a battery of tests, Rob was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when someone's body produces high levels of blood acids, or ketones. Rob had no idea he was diabetic, and it's a good thing he took precautionary measures. If untreated, the condition can lead to a diabetic coma. But there's good news ... our Kardashian sources say the doctors told Rob if he eats well and leads a "healthy lifestyle," he can actually get his diabetes, which is type 2, under control and potentially have it go into remission. Rob is back at home and resting, and this may be just what the doctor ordered -- literally -- to get him back on the right path. Continue reading >>

Do You Feel Sexy?

Do You Feel Sexy?

Are you attractive, even with diabetes? I admit to not feeling that attractive in my wheelchair sometimes, but maybe that’s just a lack of self-esteem. Diabetes or no, do you think you look good? Do you feel sexy? Being sick is not sexy; being old is not sexy. But a lot of people with diabetes and other conditions seem pretty attractive to me. So do some people over 80, like this 86-year-old gymnast. You’re not too old to be sexy until you decide to be. My Mom is 90 and still attracts guys whenever she goes to the senior center. Disabled people can be sexy, too. A lot depends on your attitude. First of all, is it even a good thing to be sexy and be seen as attractive? Is sexiness good for you? I would argue that feeling sexy is both a sign of health and a promoter of health. If you feel confident about your body and secure in yourself, you will be seen as sexy. And you will probably be healthier, because confidence reduces stress, which is good for you. If you feel sexy, you may draw other people to you. Maybe that can be a drag at times, but it might also bring you more support and more positive experiences. Sure, some people drop sexiness and the whole physical attraction part of life. A lot of them seem to do fine, if they find something else to replace it. But if it hurts you to be on the sidelines of romance, what can you do about it? Feeling sexy with diabetes On the social networking site TuDiabetes, JeffD posted about doubting his ability to attract women as a man with diabetes. The replies mostly centered on being honest about diabetes. Don’t be ashamed; don’t hide. Others recommend hormone treatments to boost energy. Many people with diabetes are low in testosterone. In both men and women, low levels of testosterone often cause low levels of desire. So Continue reading >>

Keeping Your Sex Life Alive With Diabetes

Keeping Your Sex Life Alive With Diabetes

Diabetes doesn’t have to dim your sex life. Here’s how to recapture your confidence, reconnect with your partner and reignite your passion. Does your sexual desire leave, well, something to be desired? Diabetes can cause a number of sexual difficulties for men and women, including low libido, decreased vaginal lubrication, painful intercourse, inability to orgasm and lack of endurance, not to mention the psychological factors (stress, anxiety, depression, low self-esteem) that can make it difficult to feel sexy or connect deeply with your partner. Indeed, women who receive insulin are twice as likely to report sexual dissatisfaction and difficulty achieving orgasm compared with women without the condition, according to research in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology. And there’s a strong link between diabetes and erectile dysfunction (ED) in men as a result of nerve damage in sexual organs. The good news: Diabetes doesn’t have to stand between you and a satisfying sex life. You can learn to recapture your confidence, reconnect with your partner and reignite your passion. Here’s how. Open up to your healthcare team Intimacy may be the last thing on your mind while visiting your endocrinologist or diabetes educator, but don’t be bashful about mentioning your sexual difficulties. Spark the conversation by asking, “Is it common for diabetes to interfere with a person’s sex life?” Sexual dysfunction may be a significant marker for heart disease among men with longstanding type 1 diabetes—it may be even more indicative than high blood pressure and high cholesterol, say researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Work with your healthcare team to pinpoint what, specifically, is standing in your way—loss of libido, ED, low self-esteem—and how Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Talking Sexy Pumpers And Bionic Love For Valentine's Day

Ask D'mine: Talking Sexy Pumpers And Bionic Love For Valentine's Day

Diabetes isn't very loving, but here at the 'Mine, we do our best to support you! Welcome to another edition of our weekly advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. In today's Valentine's Day edition, Wil takes up a question on diabetes, and um... intimate moments. And what if you're not the only PWD in the house and bed? Yup, here's some advice you might need in your diabetic household on this most romance-laden day of the year. Beware: some R-rated content ensues. {Need help navigating life with diabetes? Email us at [email protected]} Becky, type 1 from Mississippi, writes: I’ve been type 1 for a few years but just recently started pumping and got a CGM, and I’m not feeling fit for romance with all this gear on my body. Some of my D-sisters have said guys don’t care about such things, but I’m not convinced. Lumpy transmitters, white tape (my skin is dark brown, thanks a lot, tape companies), weird connectors, and tubes… Are you kidding me? I’m supposed to look hot with all this life-support gear? I need a guy view from a straight shooter, so naturally, Wil, you came to mind. Give it to me straight: can I still be hot and half-machine? [email protected] D’Mine answers: Romance, diabetes, gear, hot chicks…I love it! What a great Valentine’s Day gift your question is, Becky, thank you! So shooting straight, let me say that there’s probably not a man on the planet who doesn’t think that Star Trek Voyager’s Seven of Nine, played by actress Jeri Ryan, isn’t hot. And she’s literally half machine. Mixing machinery and flesh isn’t really a problem for men, since it’s the two things we love most: Gals and Gear. Don’t believe me? Just look to the millions of dollars we men spend each y Continue reading >>

Pill For Diabetes That Costs Just £1.30 A Day Also Cuts The Risk Of Heart And Kidney Disease By 14%

Pill For Diabetes That Costs Just £1.30 A Day Also Cuts The Risk Of Heart And Kidney Disease By 14%

A cheap anti-diabetes drug slashes the risk of heart attacks and kidney disease, a major study has found. Experts last night said the study, carried out among 10,000 patients in 30 countries, heralds a ‘new era’ in the treatment of type two diabetes. Canagliflozin, a pill taken once a day before breakfast, is designed to lower blood sugar levels and keep weight down. But the new study, presented last night at the American Diabetes Association Conference in San Diego, reveals the £1.30-a-day drug also has a remarkable impact on cardiovascular problems and kidney disease. Because these issues are strongly linked to type two diabetes, the drug could make a huge difference to the four million people in the UK who have the disease. The findings, published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, found canagliflozin reduced the overall risk of cardiovascular disease - which includes heart attacks and strokes by 14 per cent. It also slashed the risk of being hospitalised with heart failure - a serious problem in which the heart does not pump enough blood around the body - by 33 per cent. And patients were 40 per cent less likely to suffer serious kidney decline - a major side effect of diabetes. Professor Bruce Neal, of The George Institute for Global Health at Sydney University, said the findings offer real hope to the 500million people around the world living with type two diabetes. He said: ‘Coronary heart disease is the biggest killer by far for people with type 2 diabetes. ‘Our findings suggest that not only does canagliflozin significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, it also has many other benefits too. We found it also reduced blood pressure and led to weight loss. ‘Type two diabetes is growing rapidly all over the world and we need drugs tha Continue reading >>

How To Manage Type 1 Diabetes In A Healthy Way

How To Manage Type 1 Diabetes In A Healthy Way

Hiya Gorgeous, One of my biggest priorities is to help readers with chronic health issues thrive. And, a challenge that many of my readers (or the people they love) face is diabetes. So, last week we focused on type 2 diabetes and this week we’re shining a light on type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is something my team and I often talk about behind-the-scenes. That’s because our Crazy Sexy Dietitian, Jen Reilly, is mom to a very special young man with this health challenge. Her son, Jake, was diagnosed at age two. Whereas type 2 diabetes is often the result of insulin resistance and can sometimes be reversed with weight loss, exercise and a healthy diet, type 1 diabetes is the result of an autoimmune response where the body attacks and kills the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Unfortunately, it can’t be reversed. Learn how technology, planning, prepping & high-protein plant foods can help you manage type 1 #diabetes. @Kris_Carr Even though there’s nothing that can prevent type 1 diabetes, Jen has made use of the amazing technology available and found some incredible plant-powered tricks to help her son thrive. And in honor of November being Diabetes Awareness Month, she’s here to share her nutrition and mama bear expertise with all of you. Although, these tips apply to adults, as well. Take it away, Jen! Thanks, Kris. While finding out that you or your child has a chronic health issue like diabetes is scary at first, it quickly becomes part of your daily routine. We’ve found a way to make sure Jake has a normal, healthy and happy life regardless of his diagnosis. And, the same goes for anyone with type 1. But before we get to the tips that’ll help you manage this health challenge, let’s cover some basics. The symptoms of type 1 are very subt Continue reading >>

It Doesn’t Have To Be Sexy

It Doesn’t Have To Be Sexy

It seems like every day we hear about some new way cool whiz bang cloud enabled device that will revolutionize diabetes management. If it’s a not cloud enabled, this or cloud enabled that why even bother to pay attention. We do after all live in an interconnected world often times paying more attention to our smartphones than the people standing right next to us. The fact is investors, analysts, heck just about everyone love all these sexy way cool whiz bang cloud enabled stuff. Then along comes Becton Dickinson (NYSE: BDX) who’s about as sexy as Donald Trump . . . This content is restricted to subscribers. Please subscribe. Already have an account? Please login. Continue reading >>

Are You A Sexy Diabetic? 10 Tips To Improve Your Love Life.

Are You A Sexy Diabetic? 10 Tips To Improve Your Love Life.

Tips to spice up your love life. Men and women dealing with diabetes and struggling to enjoy a healthy sex life might want to consider these ten strategies for improved physical intimacy. For men living with the blood sugar disease, a low libido can follow them around like a shadow. Diabetes happens to be one of the most devastating diseases that anyone can have. And that unwanted umbra in the bedroom isn’t restricted to men alone. Low blood sugar can cause vaginal dryness. And with both sexes, diabetes is a culprit that can make reaching an orgasm seems as unattainable as reaching the top of Mount Everest. Men and women dealing with diabetes and struggling to enjoy a healthy sex life might want to consider these ten strategies for improved physical intimacy. Prepare like it is an exercise. This helps prevent blood sugar lows undermining your most intimate moments as hypoglycemic events during sex ruin the moment. So if you need insulin, monitor your blood sugar before sex if you note that it’s low, include a sexy snack, like strawberries or chocolate that you and your special someone can share together. Spontaneity. Planned intimacy is great, but sometimes passionate functions best when there is no routine. Experts suggest that you just roll with the moment, but remind diabetes to check their glucose level following love making. Use a lubricant. Diabetes can cause vaginal dryness, so al lubricant can make sex more enjoyable. Janis Roszler, a diabetes educator in Miami and author of Sex and Diabetes: For Him and For Her suggest you speak to your doctor about using one regularly, not just during sex. “Think of it like hand cream,” says. Sex kit. You might want to consider keeping a box of juice or glucose tablets and test supplies near the bed. If you have to sto Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Sex And Diabetes: From Her Point Of View

Type 1 Diabetes: Sex And Diabetes: From Her Point Of View

I have had type 1 diabetes since the age of ten. When my husband and I were first married, I had no trouble with my sex drive. After the births of our three children, however, I noticed a big decrease in desire. I have also had a hysterectomy and have gained 50 pounds since we were first married. Do you think my weight has something to do with it? I really don’t feel it is fair to put my husband through my lack of desire. He still seems to want me. It seems to me that diabetes and sex with regard to men is an open book, but diabetes and sex with regard to women is still very much in the closet. Why does it have to be this way, and can we bring it out in the open? CJ Dear CJ, You are right that women’s sexuality is “very much in the closet,” and not just with regard to diabetes. For centuries, we’ve been told that women shouldn’t enjoy sex or want sex at all. Male sexuality is praised and promoted (“he’s a stud”), while female sexuality is insulted (“she’s a whore”). One example: some countries, states, and companies will pay for Viagra or the other erection drugs for men, but won’t cover birth control pills. Let’s bring diabetes and women’s sexuality out in the open, shall we? Men, this is for you, too. Normally, diabetes (type 1 or 2) does not directly decrease sexual desire (also called “libido”). Indirectly, however, it can lower libido in several ways. If your sugars aren’t well controlled, you will feel too tired for sex. If your circulation or nerve function is damaged by diabetes, sex won’t feel as good. You may have lubrication problems and possibly pain with intercourse, which are obviously turnoffs. Women with diabetes are more likely to get vaginal infections (vaginitis), which makes sex uncomfortable. Depression often go Continue reading >>

Dressing Diabetes

Dressing Diabetes

You’ve probably seen an insulin pump, even if you didn’t realize it. Most of them look like clunky pagers connected by medical tubing to an injection where the insulin is delivered. Another kind is “wireless“ and looks like a little pod, which is controlled by a separate remote. With the first, the wearer is dealing with a Game Boy-like device strapped onto some part of her clothing or tucked away in a pocket. With the second comes an ovular bulge protruding from her arm or stomach. Neither option is particularly subtle, and newly diagnosed 17-year-old me was repulsed by both. Like most high school juniors, I was full of insecurities about literally everything from my shoe size to my handwriting. Like most high school juniors, I was full of insecurities about literally everything from my shoe size to my handwriting, but mostly about my skin — I also have a genetic condition called keratosis pilaris, which causes my skin to be dry, bumpy, and often reddish. My body and the way clothes fit on it was one thing I was confident about, so wearing a bulky insulin pump (all the time, forever) was highly unappealing. “What if I want to wear a dress that doesn’t have pockets? What about prom? What about dance competitions? What about the beach?” I was a busy high schooler and I didn’t want to take the time to think about these things while I got dressed every day. I certainly didn’t want to draw negative attention to myself. I didn’t want to answer questions from rude mean high schoolers about my disease. I didn’t want people to treat me like a sick person. Most of all, I didn’t want to give up the freedom of getting to wear what I wanted and look how I wanted when I felt like diabetes had already taken a sizable portion of my freedom away. I was 17 then Continue reading >>

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