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Sex And Diabetes

Diabetes And Sexual Health

Diabetes And Sexual Health

Sexual problems as a result of having diabetes can affect both men and women. Although these sexual health problems can be fairly common among people with diabetes, they are often not widely discussed. The good news is that often there are treatments for diabetes-related sex problems. There are a few reasons why men with diabetes may suffer from sexual problems. Some of these problems are no different to those that the general male population might have. Erectile dysfunction and diabetes The most common sexual problem in men with diabetes is erectile dysfunction (sometimes called impotence) — an inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. This includes difficulty getting and sustaining an erection. Erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes can be caused by: damage to nerves or blood vessels supplying the penis; poor blood sugar control; and stress or fear of not being able to achieve an erection. Nerve and blood vessel damage Nerve damage, or neuropathy, can come about because ongoing high blood sugar levels damage the blood vessels that bring oxygen and nutrients to the nerves. When the nerves are damaged they are not able to transmit signals properly. If the nerves that supply the penis are damaged, even though you might have the mental stimulation to have sex, the message from the brain doesn’t reach the penis and it doesn’t respond. As well as blood vessels damaging nerves, nerve damage can damage blood vessels and narrow them. If the blood vessels supplying the penis become narrowed, blood can’t flow in fast enough to make an erection and keep it. Another problem that can occur with the blood vessels is atherosclerosis. This is the name doctors give to hardening and narrowing of the arteries. People with diabetes are susceptible to ath Continue reading >>

Sex Og Diabetes: Et Tabubelagt Tema?

Sex Og Diabetes: Et Tabubelagt Tema?

Thomas er fdt i 1992, har tidligere studert og jobbet med IT og tar for tiden en lektorutdanning p Universitetet i Agder. Han er opptatt av en sunn livsstil, og kombinere kosthold og trening med et balansert sosialt liv. P bloggen skriver Thomas om hvordan han tilpasser diabetes p reise og i dagliglivet, samt forskningsbaserte innlegg Et tema det ble snakket lite om da jeg l p sykehuset den gangen, men som er viktig for de aller fleste av oss, nemlig sex. Da jeg fikk diagnosen diabetes type 1 for fem r siden og visste jeg lite om hva det innebar ha diabetes. Jeg var ikke var klar over at det virkelig har innvirkning p alle aspekter av livet. Da jeg fikk diagnosen var det begrenset informasjon om diabetes, sex og samliv. Jeg fikk noe informasjon om hvilke senkomplikasjoner som kan pvirke sexlivet, og hva man br passe p. Utover dette var det ikke et tema som ble snakket om. Dette kan vre fordi sex er et tema mange finner ukomfortabelt snakke om med en ukjent, selv i helsesammenheng. Som med alle spontane aktiviteter har man ikke helt oversikt over hva blodsukkeret ligger p, og da er det en risiko for at det blir lavt. Som vi alle vet er ikke samleie alltid planlagt til punkt og prikke. For min del blir jeg ukomfortabel hvis jeg fr lavt blodsukker midt i akten , s jeg anbefaler alle sjekke blodsukkeret fr, selv om dette kan kanskje kan delegge stemningen litt. Hvis man fr lavt blodsukkeret fr eller under samleie er det ikke noe i veien for si at man m sjekke blodsukkeret og spise noe for f detopp. Dette er selvflgelig er ikke bare enkelt, og jeg fr fortsatt drlig samvittighet hvis jeg m avbryte for sjekke blodsukkeret. Og i verste fall spise om det blir ndvendig. Dette er en flelse jeg jobber med for bli kvitt, selv om jeg vet at personen jeg er intim med ikke har noe i m Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Reproductive Health

Diabetes & Reproductive Health

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which there is too much glucose (a sugar that is the body’s main source of energy) in the blood. If undetected or not controlled, diabetes can cause complications both in the short term (including increased risk of infections) and long term (see below). Diabetes develops when the pancreas, the gland that makes insulin, is either unable to make insulin or the insulin does not work properly. Without enough insulin (a hormone that lowers glucose levels in the blood) blood glucose levels rise and lead to health problems. What are the different types of diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes can begin at any age but often starts in childhood or young adulthood. A person with type 1 diabetes cannot make enough insulin and must have insulin every day to live. About 85 per cent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which is linked to diet, lack of exercise, obesity and family history. A person with type 2 diabetes does not produce enough insulin to control their blood glucose levels. Can diabetes be prevented? Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented. However, type 2 diabetes may be prevented by a healthy lifestyle including regular physical activity, a healthy diet and keeping weight in the healthy range. Visit the Diabetes Australia website (www.diabetesaustralia.com.au) for more general information about diabetes and its treatment. What health problems are caused by diabetes? If undetected or poorly controlled, diabetes can lead to a shorter life. Diabetes can cause blindness, kidney failure, nerve damage, reduced blood circulation that may lead to lower limb amputation, and can increase the chance of cardiovascular disease (heart attack and stroke). Men with diabetes also have a higher chance of deve Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life

Individuals with type 2 diabetes may avoid developing complications of the disease by keeping their blood glucose as steady as possible. Nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, is one of the most serious side effects of type 2 diabetes, affecting everything from your hands and feet to your brain, heart, and more. There are four significant types of diabetic neuropathy, including autonomic neuropathy, which can cause sexual dysfunction. If you're experiencing decreased sexual satisfaction with diabetes, autonomic neuropathy is likely to blame. Try these tips to reclaim your love life. Why Nerve Damage Causes Sexual Dysfunction Poor glucose control causes diabetic neuropathy, which affects the nerves of the sexual organs. According to Deena Adimoolam, MD, assistant professor of diabetes, endocrinology, and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, uncontrolled diabetes can cause damage in blood vessels and nerves, which affects sexual health. "Poor blood sugar control has a big impact on the person's sex life," she adds. For women, nerve damage can lead to decreased stimulation, which means the vagina may not produce enough lubrication to allow for easy intercourse. This in turn creates a cascading number of problems, notes Dr. Adimoolam. Sexual problems in women include decreased vaginal lubrication, painful intercourse, and diminished libido or desire, she explains. A study published in August of 2012 found that women who take insulin injections to treat diabetes are twice as likely to report sexual dissatisfaction as women without the condition. A study published in August 2012 in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology reported that women who do not treat their diabetes with insulin are still 40 percent less satisfied with their sex lives Continue reading >>

Sex Lives Of Diabetic Men Improve With Weight Loss

Sex Lives Of Diabetic Men Improve With Weight Loss

Sex Lives of Diabetic Men Improve with Weight Loss If you're an overweight man with diabetes, changing your eating habits may improve your life more than popping a pill can. A new study concludes that even for men with diabetes that's well-controlled by medication, dieting can improve the erectile dysfunction and urological problems commonly experienced. "Lower urinary tract symptoms are often ignored," said Dr. Gary Wittert, an endocrinologist at the University of Adelaide in Australia, who led the research. "But they may affect up to 40 percent of the overweight, diabetic population." These symptoms, Wittert said, include erectile dysfunction and overactive bladder syndrome, which is often characterized by urinating frequently and urgently. "Medication is expensive, medical care is expensive, here's a lifestyle change that's quick, cheap, easy, and can improve health substantially beyond anything that medication can do," Wittert said. The study is published online today (Aug. 5) in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. Wittert and his colleagues studied a group of 31 obese men with Type 2 diabetes, and screened them for sexual and urological problems. They put the men on one of two diets: a low-calorie diet using liquid meal replacements, or a high-protein diet of fresh fruits, vegetables, lean meat and fish. After eight weeks, the men on the liquid meal diet had lost between 8 and 10 percent of their body weight, and the men on the high-protein diet had lost 5 percent of their weight. In addition, both groups of men said they had improved urological and sexual health. The study followed the men for a year, switching all the men to the high-protein, more nutritional diet after eight weeks. By the end, the men from both groups had lost around 10 percent of their weight and Continue reading >>

Men's Sexual Health

Men's Sexual Health

The media portrays sex as endlessly exciting, gratifying and straightforward. However, for many people and couples the reality is quite different. Sexual problems are very common, but because sex often involves complex emotions, patients (and doctors) can find these problems difficult to raise and discuss. The focus of this section is erectile dysfunction (ED), a common sexual problem in men with diabetes. Definition of erectile dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is defined as the persistent inability to get or maintain an erection that is satisfactory for sexual activity. Although erectile dysfunction affects most men at some point in their lives, it is much more common in men with diabetes. Erectile dysfunction affects approximately 34 to 45 per cent of adult men with diabetes. Older men with a longer duration of diabetes, poor blood glucose control, and who smoke, have high blood pressure, high cholesterol and heart disease and have lower than average levels of male hormones, are at highest risk. Diabetes causes damage to the walls of the blood vessels, which affects circulation and blood flow to the penis. In addition, nerve damage can affect erection quality. Erectile dysfunction can also be a side effect of drugs that are often prescribed to men with diabetes (these include some blood pressure-lowering drugs and anti-depressants). Diagnosing erectile dysfunction - the first step in getting help The first step is telling your doctor that you are having sexual problems. He or she will ask you specific questions about the quality of your erections and sexual intercourse. Your doctor may also do a physical exam, check your blood pressure, your heart function and order other tests for your eyes, kidneys, blood glucose control, cholesterol and testosterone levels. The Can Continue reading >>

Keeping Your Sex Life Alive With Diabetes

Keeping Your Sex Life Alive With Diabetes

Diabetes doesn’t have to dim your sex life. Here’s how to recapture your confidence, reconnect with your partner and reignite your passion. Does your sexual desire leave, well, something to be desired? Diabetes can cause a number of sexual difficulties for men and women, including low libido, decreased vaginal lubrication, painful intercourse, inability to orgasm and lack of endurance, not to mention the psychological factors (stress, anxiety, depression, low self-esteem) that can make it difficult to feel sexy or connect deeply with your partner. Indeed, women who receive insulin are twice as likely to report sexual dissatisfaction and difficulty achieving orgasm compared with women without the condition, according to research in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology. And there’s a strong link between diabetes and erectile dysfunction (ED) in men as a result of nerve damage in sexual organs. The good news: Diabetes doesn’t have to stand between you and a satisfying sex life. You can learn to recapture your confidence, reconnect with your partner and reignite your passion. Here’s how. Open up to your healthcare team Intimacy may be the last thing on your mind while visiting your endocrinologist or diabetes educator, but don’t be bashful about mentioning your sexual difficulties. Spark the conversation by asking, “Is it common for diabetes to interfere with a person’s sex life?” Sexual dysfunction may be a significant marker for heart disease among men with longstanding type 1 diabetes—it may be even more indicative than high blood pressure and high cholesterol, say researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Work with your healthcare team to pinpoint what, specifically, is standing in your way—loss of libido, ED, low self-esteem—and how Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Sexual Function

How Diabetes Affects Sexual Function

Diabetes can affect sexual function, and as uncomfortable as it may sound, you may need to discuss this with your doctor (and certainly with your partner). To help you out, I have done research to bring you information about this most sensitive of subjects. First of all, having any chronic disease may in itself cause anxiety, which can result in sexual dysfunction. But having said that, it is also true that diabetics do report more sexual dysfunction than the populations at large. In his book Talking About Sex (American Psychiatric Press, Inc., 1995), Derek C. Polonsky, MD states that 20% of people with diabetes, both men and women, report sexual dysfunction. Please read the following with an open mind, not looking for something bad which will happen to you or a loved one. Rather use it as a tool to make you better informed, and more able to talk to the professionals in your life who can help when you need it. As Dr. Polonsky says, "What starts out as a physical problem is compounded by the emotional reaction to it." This article is shared to help all of us deal with the physical before this occurs. Research on Diabetes and Sexual Dysfunction There is more research on sexual dysfunction in males than females. In males, current research points to the need to develop a comprehensive biopsychosocial evaluation and treatment of diabetic patients with sexual dysfunction because of the high incidence of major depression and anxiety disorders noted in impotent men with neuropathy as compared to those who did not have depression, anxiety, or impotence, but had neuropathy. One caveat here is that just learning to cope with a chronic disease may cause psychiatric problems which may lead to lack of compliance, and may snowball into chronic complications, and so the process feeds o Continue reading >>

How May Diabetes Affect A Woman's Sex Life?

How May Diabetes Affect A Woman's Sex Life?

Many women with diabetes at one time or another experience some sexual difficulties. In fact, one study showed that 30–40% of women with diabetes reported that they have problems with sexual function, refrain from sexual relations, and are generally not satisfied with sex. But for women, long-term blood glucose levels and diabetes complications don’t appear to have a direct effect on sexual functioning. For most women with diabetes, the problem is caused by lack of arousal. There is a very strong link between mind and body. If a woman does not feel in the mood for sex, then her body does not respond the way it needs to in order for her to enjoy it. If she is not emotionally ready or interested in sex, then she will be less likely to enjoy it physically. Common Causes of Lack of Arousal Vaginal infections that affect how you feel physically and how sexy you feel Bladder infections that can cause painful intercourse Hormonal changes due to your menstrual cycle or menopause Vaginal dryness Lack of sexual desire Fear of pregnancy Depression and medications used to treat depression Diabetes can create sexual problems for some women. There are many possible causes. Diabetes can cause fatigue and reduce your libido, which is your desire to have sex. You may have physical effects such as vaginal dryness, which can make sex uncomfortable. Depression is more common in people with diabetes than in people without diabetes, and depression can take away your desire for sex. If you have diabetes and are having sexual problems, try to talk openly with your partner about it, and find a healthcare professional you can discuss these issues with. There are solutions that can help you regain a satisfying sex life. Diabetes may affect a woman's sex life due to uncontrolled blood glucose Continue reading >>

Differences By Sex In The Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus, Impaired Fasting Glycaemia And Impaired Glucose Tolerance In Sub-saharan Africa: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Differences By Sex In The Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus, Impaired Fasting Glycaemia And Impaired Glucose Tolerance In Sub-saharan Africa: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Esayas Haregot Hilawe a, Hiroshi Yatsuya b, Leo Kawaguchi a & Atsuko Aoyama a a. Department of Public Health and Health Systems, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8550, Japan. b. Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan. Correspondence to Esayas Haregot Hilawe (e-mail: [email protected]). Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2013;91:671-682D. doi: Introduction Increasing urbanization and the accompanying changes in lifestyle are leading to a burgeoning epidemic of chronic noncommunicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa.1,2 At the same time, the prevalence of many acute communicable diseases is decreasing.1,2 In consequence, the inhabitants of sub-Saharan Africa are generally living longer and this increasing longevity will result in a rise in the future incidence of noncommunicable diseases in the region.1–3 Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prominent noncommunicable diseases that are undermining the health of the people in sub-Saharan Africa and placing additional burdens on health systems that are often already strained.4,5 In 2011, 14.7 million adults in the African Region of the World Health Organization (WHO) were estimated to be living with diabetes mellitus.6 Of all of WHO’s regions, the African Region is expected to have the largest proportional increase (90.5%) in the number of adult diabetics by 2030.6 Sex-related differences in lifestyle may lead to differences in the risk of developing diabetes mellitus and, in consequence, to differences in the prevalence of this condition in women and men.3 However, the relationship between a known risk factor for diabetes mellitus – such as obesity – and the development of symptomatic diabetes mellitus may not be simple. For example, in m Continue reading >>

Effect Of Diabetes Mellitus On Sexual Arousal And Intercourse

Effect Of Diabetes Mellitus On Sexual Arousal And Intercourse

1Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, USA 2Foley Plaza Medical, USA 3Department of Urology, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, USA Corresponding Author: Sardar Ali Khan M.D., F.A.C.S, F.R.C.S, Department of Urology, Health Sciences Center Level 9 Room 040, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, 101 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8093, USA Tel: +1-631-987-0132 Fax: +1-631-444-7620 E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Gandhi J, Dagur G, Warren K, et al. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Sexual Arousal and Intercourse. Transl Biomed. 2016, 7:2. Abstract Diabetes mellitus, when producing hyperglycemia, as well as angiopathic, vasculopathic, and neuropathic complications, poses a threat to the function and viability of sexual arousal and intercourse at similar and different levels in males and females. Males are faced with hypogonadism, depression and anxiety, affecting their sexual arousal desire. Male intercourse may be impaired by erectile dysfunction, priapism, ejaculatory dysfunction, and/or benign prostatic hyperplasia. Female sexual arousal may be affected by depression, hormonal imbalance, and hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Female sexual intercourse may be disturbed by dyspareunia, vaginismus, and anorgasmia. Effects on sexual intercourse may also be seen at the gender neutral level due to cranial neuropathy and various autonomic neuropathies outside the genitourinary tract. Though specific treatments target most conditions, healthy diet and exercise are the best bets to avoid the long-term effects of diabetic complications on sexuality. Keywords Diabetes mellitus; Hypogonadism; Erectile dysfunction; Hypoactive sexual desire disorder; Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy; Cranial nerve dysfunction Continue reading >>

Is Sex Good For Your Heart Health?

Is Sex Good For Your Heart Health?

Both my husband and I are over 60 and have type 2 diabetes. He lost interest in sex a few years back, I think because he couldnt get erections. I dont really miss sex. It wasnt that great for me, anyway. But Ive been reading that sex is good for your health and that it prevents heart attacks. Is this really true? Does sex help diabetes? Should we try to be sexual because its good for us? Most of the studies saying that sex prevents heart attacks or things like that are population studies, sometimes called epidemiological studies. For example, scientists at the New England Research Institute in Massachusetts tracked the sexual activity of about 1000 men ages 40 to 70. They found that those who had sex twice a week had only half the risk of heart attack, compared to men who had less sex. In another study, scientists at Wilkes University in Pennsylvania tested the saliva of 112 college students who reported their frequency of sex. Those having sex two to three times a week had higher levels of IgA, an immune molecule that fights infection, than those who were abstinent or had sex less than once week. Writing on Web MD, health journalist Kathleen Doheny described a study in the journal Biological Psychology, wherein researchers reported that couples who lived together and had frequent sex tended to have lower diastolic blood pressure. Population studies prove nothing about cause, though. Did men have fewer heart attacks because they were having more sex, or were they having more sex because they were healthier? Maybe having stronger immune systems led the Pennsylvania students to have more sex, rather than the other way around. These studies are not strong evidence that sex improves health. Different kinds of studies provide stronger evidence. If you look at what happens i Continue reading >>

What To Do When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

What To Do When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

Men living with diabetes have enough on their plate. They need to monitor their blood glucose level, blood pressure and, most likely, several medications. If this is you, and you’re experiencing problems in your sex life, there’s a good chance you’re feeling anxious, frustrated and depressed. You may know that erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to get or maintain an erection. But did you know that ED is common among men who have diabetes? This condition can stem from problems caused by poor long-term blood sugar control, which damages nerves and blood vessels. ED also can be linked to other conditions common in men with diabetes, such as high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. The same elevated blood glucose level that causes blood vessel and nerve damage in other parts of the body also can lead to complications in blood flow and nerve damage to the penis, says Kevin Borst, DO, an endocrinologist at Lakewood Hospital’s Diabetes and Endocrine Center. “Approximately half of all men living with diabetes will experience erectile dysfunction at some point,” Dr. Borst says. Even if there’s a medical reason behind it, ED can leave any man and his partner feeling frustrated and discouraged. If you or a loved one are experiencing ED, you are not alone. And you can take steps to cope. Talk to your doctor Tell your doctor what’s going on. Your doctor will consider the underlying causes of your ED and can give you information about medication and other ED treatments. Ask what you need to do to control diabetes. Careful blood sugar control can prevent nerve and blood vessel damage that can lead to ED. Appropriately managing your diabetes is critical. Ask about other health problems. It’s common for men with diabetes to have other chronic conditions Continue reading >>

Sexual Dysfunction In Diabetes: Underrecognized And Neglected

Sexual Dysfunction In Diabetes: Underrecognized And Neglected

Sexual Dysfunction in Diabetes: Underrecognized and Neglected SAN DIEGO Treatment options for sexual dysfunction in diabetic patients are surprisingly limited, and new therapeutic targets are needed for both sexes, according to new data presented here at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2017 Scientific Sessions . To enable this, more information on who with diabetes is at highest risk of developing sexual dysfunction and the specific mechanisms underlying the dysfunction is needed, said Hunter Wessells, MD, of the department of urology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, during a symposium on urologic complications and sexual dysfunction in diabetes. Clinicians should start asking about sexual function when diabetes patients are still in their 40s and intervene as soon as the first symptoms occur, said Dr Wessells. This is because research indicates that sexual dysfunction can occur in those with diabetes years earlier than it affects those in the general population, he stressed. Asked for comment, Aruna V Sarma, PhD, research assistant professor of urology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, said sexual dysfunction may not be as lethal as neuropathy or nephropathy, but "these are conditions that matter to the participants, they are bothersome, and they impact quality of life. "We have an opportunity to motivate individuals to improve their diabetes care, because an 18-year-old or 30-year-old type 1 diabetic may be more motivated to try to prevent erectile dysfunction that may occur in their 40s, rather than perhaps a more abstract notion of what may occur with neuropathy later in life. So there may be an opportunity here to try to improve sequelae that may occur in the future." Accelerated Aging: Sexual Dysfunction Man Continue reading >>

[full Text] Sex Differences In Type 2 Diabetes: Focus On Disease Course And Outcom | Dmso

[full Text] Sex Differences In Type 2 Diabetes: Focus On Disease Course And Outcom | Dmso

Lisa Arnetz,1,2 Neda Rajamand Ekberg,1,2 Michael Alvarsson1,2 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 2Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Stockholm, Sweden Background: Women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are less likely to reach the goals for hemoglobin A1c compared with men, and have higher all-cause mortality. The risk of cardiovascular disease is elevated among both men and women with T2D, however, the risk has declined among men over recent years while it remains stationary in women. Reasons for these sex differences remain unclear, and guidelines for diabetes treatment do not differentiate between sexes. Possible causes for varying outcome include differences in physiology, treatment response, and psychological factors. This review briefly outlines sex differences in hormonal pathophysiology, and thereafter summarizes the literature to date on sex differences in disease course and outcome. Methods: Systematic searches were performed on PubMed using sex, gender, and various glucose-lowering therapies as keywords. Earlier reviews are summarized and results from individual studies are reported. Reference lists from studies were used to augment the search. Results: There is an increased risk of missing the diagnosis of T2D when screening women with only fasting plasma glucose instead of with an oral glucose tolerance test. The impact of various risk factors for complications may differ by sex. Efficacy and side effects of some glucose-lowering drugs differ between men and women. Men with T2D appear to suffer more microvascular complications, while women have higher morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease and also fare worse psychologically. Conclusion: Few studies to date have focused on sex differences in T2D. S Continue reading >>

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