diabetestalk.net

Services For Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Definition Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong (chronic) disease in which there is a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Alternative Names Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile onset diabetes; Diabetes - type 1; High blood sugar - type 1 diabetes Causes Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by special cells, called beta cells. The pancreas is below and behind the stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored and later used for energy. With type 1 diabetes, beta cells produce little or no insulin. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream instead of going into the cells. This buildup of glucose in the blood is called hyperglycemia. The body is unable to use the glucose for energy. This leads to the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Most likely, it is an autoimmune disorder. This is a condition that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue. With type 1 diabetes, an infection or another trigger causes the body to mistakenly attack the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, can be passed down through families. Symptoms HIGH BLOOD SUGAR The following symptoms may be the first signs of type 1 diabetes. Or, they may occur when blood sugar is high. Being very thirsty Feeling hungry Having blurry eyesight Feeling numbness or tingling in your feet Losing weight without trying Urinating more often (including urinating at night or bedwetting in children who were dry overnight before) For other people, these serious warning symptoms may Continue reading >>

Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes: Challenges, Research, And Future Directions

Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes: Challenges, Research, And Future Directions

Go to: The incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in young children (age <6 years) is rising. Diabetes management guidelines offered by the American Diabetes Association and health care teams understandably place a high burden of responsibility on caregivers to check young children's blood glucose levels, administer insulin, and monitor diet and physical activity with the ultimate goal of maintaining tight glycemic control. Unfortunately, this tight control is needed during a vulnerable developmental period when behavior is unpredictable, T1D can be physiologically difficult to control, parenting stress can be elevated, and caregivers are strained by normal child caretaking routines. Despite the potentially different management needs, specific education and clinical services for managing diabetes in young children are rarely offered, and behavioral research with this young child age group has been limited in scope and quantity. Research findings pertinent to young children with T1D are reviewed, and potential clinical implications, as well as areas for future research, are discussed. Go to: Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses diagnosed in childhood and occurs in 1:400-600 American children [1]. An increasing number of young children are impacted by T1D [2, 3], with 15-20% of new diagnoses occurring in children under age 5 [4]. This is an alarming figure and the reason for the increased incidence in this youngest age group is unknown. Diabetes management in young children can be challenging for a variety of reasons, including physiological factors such as increased insulin sensitivity and a potentially shortened honeymoon period. Daily T1D management is further complicated by young children's cognitive, behavioral, and social-emo Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. Different factors, including genetics and some viruses, may contribute to type 1 diabetes. Although type 1 diabetes usually appears during childhood or adolescence, it can develop in adults. Despite active research, type 1 diabetes has no cure. Treatment focuses on managing blood sugar levels with insulin, diet and lifestyle to prevent complications. Symptoms Type 1 diabetes signs and symptoms can appear relatively suddenly and may include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Bed-wetting in children who previously didn't wet the bed during the night Extreme hunger Unintended weight loss Irritability and other mood changes Fatigue and weakness Blurred vision When to see a doctor Consult your doctor if you notice any of the above signs and symptoms in you or your child. Causes The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Usually, the body's own immune system — which normally fights harmful bacteria and viruses — mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing (islet, or islets of Langerhans) cells in the pancreas. Other possible causes include: Genetics Exposure to viruses and other environmental factors The role of insulin Once a significant number of islet cells are destroyed, you'll produce little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that comes from a gland situated behind and below the stomach (pancreas). The pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. Insulin circulates, allowing sugar to enter your cells. Insulin lowers the amount of sugar in your bloodstream. As your blood sugar level drops, so does the secre Continue reading >>

College/university With Type 1 Diabetes

College/university With Type 1 Diabetes

So youre making the huge transition from high school to college congratulations! College is awesome, but whether youve been recently diagnosed or have had diabetes for years, navigating college life with T1D will require extra precautions. As in grade school, your college is legally responsible for accommodating your T1D needs, but its your responsibility to make your T1D known and to request the assistance you deserve. Contact your schools Office of Disability Services As a student with T1D, you have a right to accommodations . As soon as you make your decision, contact your colleges Office of Disability Services to see what services they offer. Many colleges require that you provide a letter from your doctor that includesyour T1D diagnosis and a request for specific accommodations. Examples of special accommodations include: On campus housing and in-room accommodations, like refrigerators for insulin and snacks Campus meal plan, including nutritional information and access to dorms with cafeterias or accessibility to those near by Early class registration to ensure optimal schedule Notification to teaching staff of your T1D status Breaks during class and exams for self-care Ability to reschedule exams in cases of hypo/hyperglycemia Changes to classroom attendance policies to accommodate the potential for sudden hypo/hyperglycemia or diabetes-related illnesses Find more information on your rights as a college student with T1D HERE . FERPA (The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) gives parents certain rights with respect to their childrens education and medical records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18. If you want your parents to assist in any way with your medical care while you are at college, be sure to authorize acce Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes: Individualized, Long-Range Care At Virtua, you will receive the tools, training and confidence you need to take care of yourself or a loved one with type 1 diabetes. Our individualized, long-range approach is especially important for those facing type 1 diabetes because living with this disease requires you to pay careful attention to your daily routine. You'll learn how to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels accurately and regularly. When you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not produce enough insulin, so your body is unable to properly convert the foods you eat into the energy it needs to function properly. Depending on your specific needs, you may also need to rely on insulin shots or an insulin pump to maintain the right insulin levels. Treating kids with type 1 diabetes Because type 1 diabetes often affects people when they are young, we understand how food plays a big role in kids’ lives. We take steps to help even our youngest patients learn how to navigate the healthiest food choices. For example, every Halloween, Virtua offers a special candy exchange program so that kids can still enjoy the thrill of trick or treating without the temptation of having piles of candy around after the holiday. Our expert staff provides a variety of support groups geared to address all the special needs kids and teens face when living with diabetes. We also provide a safe syringe disposal program for patients who require insulin shots. If you are the parent of a child or young adult who has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you may feel uncertain about your child’s future. But as Virtua’s expert staff of certified diabetes educators will show you, people with type 1 diabetes can live long, healthy, happy lives when they maintain the right bl Continue reading >>

For People With Type 1 Diabetes (t1d)

For People With Type 1 Diabetes (t1d)

The Herbert Family Program for young adults with t1d The program focuses on meeting the unique needs of young adults with t1d (ages 18-30). It addresses the financial, psychological, social and physical aspects of type 1 diabetes that challenge not only the patient but also their family and support networks. Services available: Social opportunities to meet and interact with others who have type 1 diabetes Individual and group counseling following consultation Insurance and community resource information Diabetes education including diabetes self-management education, meter pump and sensor training and management and medical nutrition therapy Preconception, pregnancy, and post-natal counseling and education Psychological healthy and support by a licensed clinical social worker If you are interested in the Herbert Family Program and/or our events please also visit us on Facebook. T1D event calendar If your child has T1D please visit our partner the PADRE Foundation for events and news. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes is a higher level of glucose in the blood than is normal. Glucose travels through your body in the blood. A hormone called insulin then helps glucose move from your blood to your cells. Once glucose is in your cells it can be used for energy. A problem making or using insulin means glucose can not move into your cells. Instead the glucose will build up in your blood. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not make insulin. This will lead to the build up of glucose in the blood, also called hyperglycemia. At the same time, your cells are not getting glucose they need to function well. Over a long period of time high blood glucose levels can also damage vital organs. The blood vessels, heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves are most commonly affected organs. Type 1 diabetes is often found during childhood and young adulthood. What Causes Diabetes? Our immune system keeps us well by fighting off and destroying viruses and bacteria. Unfortunately, sometimes the immune system attacks healthy tissue. Most type 1 diabetes develop because the immune system attacks and destroys the cells that make insulin. These cells are in the pancreas. It is not yet clear why the immune system attacks these cells. It is believed that some people have genes that make them prone to getting diabetes. For these people, certain triggers in the environment may make the immune system attack the pancreas. The triggers are not known but may be certain viruses, foods or chemicals. Type 1 diabetes may also develop as a complication of other medical conditions. It may develop in: People with chronic type 2 diabetes who lose the ability to make insulin. Some with chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic surgery. They may lose the cells that make insulin. Are You at Risk? Risk factors include: Family history (paren Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

Center For Diabetes Services - Type 1 Diabetes

Center For Diabetes Services - Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes is an auto-immune disorder in which the body does not produce any insulin. Type 1 diabetes occurs most often in children and young adults, and accounts for only 5-10% of cases. Treatment for Type 1 is daily insulin injections. Siblings or children of people with Type 1 diabetes. Detailed information from Healthwise on Type 1 Diabetes: The Center for Diabetes Services recognizes the special needs of persons with type 1 diabetes, and provide education, technology, and support. In cooperation with your physician we assist with: Pattern Management: finding the right types and timing of insulin to safely manage blood sugar (glucose). Carbohydrate Counting: adjusting mealtime insulin doses to result in controlled blood glucose after meals. Glucose Sensors / Continuous Blood Glucose Readout: using sensors to help better understand blood glucose patterns with fewer finger-sticks. Insulin Pumps: continuous insulin infusion providing smoother blood glucose control, without multiple daily insulin injections. Continue reading >>

Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Adults with Type 1 Diabetes Integrated Diabetes Services 2018-03-13T19:54:42+00:00 Intensive Care for Adults with Type 1 Diabetes These days, it seems that healthcare systems and the general public focus plenty of attention on the type-2 diabetes epidemic and all the little kids with diabetes. What about the multitudes of adults who have type-1? Well, youve found the place that is dedicated to you. Integrated Diabetes Services is owned and operated by adults with type 1 diabetes, so we get it when it comes to diabetes care. Unlike most hospital-based programs, our diabetes management services dont stop at providing basic education. We teach you the tricks of the trade that make living with diabetes and managing blood sugars easier than ever. We also have the experience and expertise to help you fine-tune your insulin doses, whether youre an experienced pump user or simply taking injections. We take pride in being technologically-savvy (almost as much as teenagers!), so we can offer insight on the latest products and devices, and make use of communication tools that allow consultations to be held from your home, office, or wherever you choose. Our team of diabetes educators has passion for helping other adults with diabetes. We know that diabetes doesnt take breaks or vacations, so we make ourselves available to you above-and-beyond the usual call of duty. Need help preparing for a surgical procedure? Well guide you. Having lows during a new type of workout? Well offer specific adjustments. Not sure which pump to choose? Well direct you to the most helpful information. In virtually all cases, we respond to your questions and concerns within hours, not days or weeks. Since 1995, Integrated Diabetes Services has helped thousands of adults with type 1 diabetes to do the fo Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Whether you have had diabetes for some time or are newly diagnosed, Providence Diabetes Education offers you and your family the knowledge and self-care skills necessary to live a healthy life. Our goal is to help you live well and to keep you well informed. What is type 1 diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the body can’t make insulin. Insulin is needed to help glucose enter cells for energy. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. This causes high blood glucose or high blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes may also be known as: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) Juvenile diabetes Brittle diabetes Sugar diabetes Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in the U.S. Type 1 diabetes most often develops in children or young adults, but can start at any age. What causes type 1 diabetes? The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. It’s thought that genetic and environmental factors are involved. The body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Insulin lets glucose to enter the cells for energy. When glucose can’t enter the cells, it builds up in the blood. This deprives the cells of nutrition. It also results in high blood sugar. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin shots and regularly check their blood sugar levels. What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes often appears suddenly. Symptoms may include: Unusual thirst Frequent passing urine Extreme hunger but loss of weight Blurred vision Nausea and vomiting Extreme weakness and fatigue Irritability and mood changes In children, symptoms may be similar to those of having the flu. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes may look like other conditions or health problems. Always see your healthcare provider for a diagnosis. How is ty Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes At School

Managing Type 1 Diabetes At School

Patient Guide to Managing Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes Written by Amy Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE Type 1 diabetes requires constant attentionit doesn't go away during school hours. That's why it's essential that school staff, including teachers, bus drivers, and school health personnel, understand the needs of their students with type 1 diabetes to ensure that school is a safe and healthy environment. More than 13,000 young people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year.1 Because the disease is so common in young children, it's important that schools have at least some staff members who have a basic understanding of type 1 diabetes. Having a school worker on hand who knows how to check blood glucose, inject insulin, and choose an appropriate snack when blood glucose levels are low provides an enormous amount of security to parents. Children with type 1 diabetes rely on both parents and school officials to ensure that their condition is managed at school. That's a big responsibility for parents and school workers, but fortunately, there are resources available to help make your child's school conducive to managing type 1 diabetes. For parents, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) offer sample school type 1 diabetes care forms that alert the school to your child's condition and provide instructions on how the school should respond in an emergency situation. For school staff, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Helping the Student with Type 1 Diabetes Succeed: A Guide for School Personnel provides a comprehensive overview of important considerations for schools that have students with type 1 diabetes. Laws Protecting Your Child with Type 1 Diabetes As a Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

Contact Us Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. Five to ten percent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Those with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes include intense thirst, being very tired, urinating often, losing weight and blurred vision. If you or someone you know is experiencing these symptoms and/or think you might have type 1 diabetes, your doctor can do a blood test to measure the amount of sugar in your blood. This test will show if you have diabetes. People may inherit the gene that causes type 1 diabetes. Then, something in their environment, maybe a virus, maybe stress causes their body to destroy cells of the pancreas gland that make insulin. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children with type 1 diabetes can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy, happy lives. At its core, proper type 1 diabetes management is composed of a handful of elements: blood glucose control and insulin management, exercise, nutrition and support. It is important to keep blood sugar close to normal. Having high blood sugar can cause serious problems over time and can lead to nerve damage, kidney disease, vision problems, pain or loss of feeling in hands and feet, amputation, heart disease and strokes. Low blood sugar can cause one to have a fast heart beat, shake and sweat. People with very low blood sugar can get headaches, get very sleepy, pass out, or even suffer from seizures. The Mary & Dick Allen Diabetes Center offers services, support, education, and events for those with type 1 diabetes. The Herbert Family Program focuses on meeting the unique Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Resources

Type 1 Diabetes: Resources

Organizations American Association of Diabetes Educators 100 West Monroe Street Suite 400 Chicago, IL 60603 Phone: 1-800-338-3633 Fax: (312) 424-2427 E-mail: [email protected] Web Address: The American Association of Diabetes Educators is made up of doctors, nurses, dietitians, and other health professionals with special interest and training in diabetes care. It can supply the names of these types of health professionals in your local area. American Diabetes Association (ADA) 1701 North Beauregard Street Alexandria, VA 22311 Phone: 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) E-mail: [email protected] Web Address: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is a national organization for health professionals and consumers. Almost every state has a local office. ADA sets the standards for the care of people with diabetes. Its focus is on research for the prevention and treatment of all types of diabetes. ADA provides patient and professional education mainly through its publications, which include the monthly magazine Diabetes Forecast, books, brochures, cookbooks and meal planning guides, and pamphlets. It provides information for parents about caring for a child with diabetes. Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International 120 Wall Street New York, NY 10005-4001 Phone: 1-800-533-CURE (1-800-533-2873) Fax: (212) 785-9595 E-mail: [email protected] Web Address: The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International's mission is to find a cure for diabetes and its complications through research. This organization publishes a wide variety of booklets on complications and treatments of diabetes. The organization's focus is on research for the prevention and treatment of type 1 diabetes. National Diabetes Education Program (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Continue reading >>

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

How costly is diabetes management and treatment? Diabetes management and treatment is expensive. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the average cost of health care for a person with diabetes is $13,741 a year—more than twice the cost of health care for a person without diabetes.1 Many people who have diabetes need help paying for their care. For those who qualify, a variety of government and nongovernment programs can help cover health care expenses. This publication is meant to help people with diabetes and their family members find and access such resources. 1American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. 2013;36(4):1033–1046. What is health insurance? Health insurance helps pay for medical care, including the cost of diabetes care. Health insurance options include the following: private health insurance, which includes group and individual health insurance government health insurance, such as Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), TRICARE, and veterans’ health care programs Starting in 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) prevents insurers from denying coverage or charging higher premiums to people with preexisting conditions, such as diabetes. The ACA also requires most people to have health insurance or pay a fee. Some people may be exempt from this fee. Read more about the ACA at HealthCare.gov or call 1–800–318–2596, TTY 1–855–889–4325. Key Terms Some terms listed here have many meanings; only those meanings that relate to the financial and medical aspects of diabetes and its management and treatment are included. affiliation period: a period of time that must pass before health insurance coverage provided by a health maintenance organization (HMO) be Continue reading >>

More in diabetes