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Seeds Good For Diabetics

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

Are you bored with sugar-free candy, low carbohydrate pasta, and endless chicken dinners? Having diabetes does not mean that your diet should be boring. In fact, it should be the opposite. Variety keeps your palate interested and ensures that you get a healthy balance of vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants. The following 5 foods may or may not be a regular part of your diet, but each has a positive effect on diabetes management and prevention. Experiment with some of the “try this” options below for an easy way to incorporate these foods into your meals. Sunflower Seeds Sunflower seeds are a humble snack. They often sit on the shelf overlooked because of the hoards of positive press that almonds and walnuts get. Almonds and walnuts are very healthful nuts, but sunflower seeds are also full of important vitamins and minerals. Some of the nutrients in sunflower seeds that make them unique are copper, vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, and zinc. The presence and combination of so many of these nutrients can be hard to come by in common foods. Sunflower seeds have about 3 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein in an ounce of kernels. The best part is that sunflower seeds, while high in total fat (about 14 grams), contain mostly polyunsaturated fat, which researchers believe is the best type of fat to combat diabetes. Try this: Swap out your peanuts for sunflower seeds. Or hunt down a jar of sunflower seed butter instead of peanut butter for an easy way to get your fix. Salmon Salmon boasts numerous health benefits. It’s a great source of protein that is low in saturated fat and has important omega-3 fatty acid for excellent heart health. The combination of omega-3 and polyunsaturated fats in salmon keeps blood pressure down and protects the heart from disease. Research Continue reading >>

Are Jackfruit Seeds Good In A Diabetic Person?

Are Jackfruit Seeds Good In A Diabetic Person?

Answered Feb 7, 2018 Author has 231 answers and 146.8k answer views Technically, the answer is Yes. You can, but would you? I mean, when you are a diabetic, it is always better to monitor your carb consumption. Now, as far as jackfruit is concerned, nutritionally, it is literally the jack of all fruits. 100 g of edible jackfruit bulbs provide 95 calories. The fruit is made of soft, easily digestible flesh (arils). Jackfruit is rich in dietary fiber, which makes it a good bulk laxative. The fiber content helps protect the colon mucous membrane by binding to and eliminating cancer-causing chemicals from the colon. The fresh fruit has small but significant amounts of vitamin-A, and flavonoid pigments such as carotene-, xanthin, lutein, and cryptoxanthin-. Together, these compounds play vital roles in antioxidant and vision functions. Vitamin-A also required for maintaining the integrity of mucosa and skin. Consumption of natural fruits rich in vitamin-A and carotenes has been found to protect from lung and oral cavity cancers. Jackfruit is a good source of antioxidant vitamin-C, provides about 13.7 mg or 23% of RDA. Consumption of foods rich in vitamin-C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful free radicals. It is one of the rare fruits that is rich in a B-complex group of vitamins. It contains outstanding amounts of vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), niacin, riboflavin, and folic acid. Further, fresh fruit is a good source of potassium, magnesium, manganese, and iron. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Although it is high in sugars, these arent released immediately and does not spike the blood sugar levels much. However, as with all fruits, diabetics should cons Continue reading >>

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Nuts! Can nuts help prevent diabetes? Can nuts help control diabetes? Are nuts a healthy snack or just another fad? Should you include nuts in your diet? The simple answer is yes—though, read on, because there are some caveats (aren’t there always…) to the simple “yes” answer. What are Nuts? Nuts are seeds in a hard shell and are the seeds of various trees. These nuts are commonly called tree nuts. Botanically, nuts are also those where the shell does not break apart to release the nuts—these shells have to get broken to free the nut. However, for the sake of this article, the more general use of nuts—those in hard shells that need to be broken (chestnuts and hazelnuts) and other nuts that technically are legumes (like the peanut) and seeds (eg. Pecans, Almonds) are included. Some of the more common nuts are:[1] Hazelnuts/Filberts Brazil nuts Almonds Cashews Chestnuts Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Macadamia nuts Pistachios Coconuts Acorns The USDA’s “Choose My Plate” program designed to help people make healthy eating choices included nuts in the Protein Foods Group, but nuts are high in a number of other nutrients as well, including fiber, the heart healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, healthy omega-3 fats, vitamins and minerals. Nuts are also high in anti-oxidants. One thing to note is that nuts are also high in calories. However, while noting that, it is also important to remember that while you DO want to watch your calories, you are getting an awful lot of healthy nutrition along with those calories and are NOT getting a lot of sugars, cholesterol or unhealthy fats (the sorts of unhealthy saturated fats that can clog up arteries). The way you can get the health benefits of nuts without paying a large “calorie price” is to use nuts a Continue reading >>

Is Chia Good For Diabetics?

Is Chia Good For Diabetics?

Chia seeds are tiny dark, nutty-flavored seeds that are rich in nutrients like healthy fats, fiber and antioxidants, notes MedlinePlus. Because chia seeds are packed with nutrients but aren't high-carb foods, these seeds may show potential for people with diabetes. Blood Sugar Control According to Harvard Health Publications, some research shows that chia seeds may help diabetics control blood sugar levels. A study published in 2007 in Diabetes Care found that chia appears to help improve blood sugar control and heart-disease risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes. However, research is still ongoing to help determine the effects fatty acids found in chia seeds on blood sugar levels. Heart Health Because chia seeds are packed with fiber and heart-healthy fats, they may help improve the heart health of people with diabetes. High-fiber diets help reduce blood cholesterol, which in turn reduces your risk for heart disease. Harvard Health Publications notes that diets rich in chia improve cholesterol levels in animal studies. Furthermore, the heart-healthy omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids found in chia seeds could help reduce your risk for heart disease when eaten in place of saturated and trans fats. Weight Management Chia seeds can also aid in healthy weight management when you have diabetes. If you're diabetic and overweight, shedding pounds often hepls improve blood sugar control. Because chia seeds are rich in protein and fiber, two nutrients that help keep you feeling full without the extra calories, these seeds can help you control hunger -- and your calorie intake. MedlinePlus notes that just 1 tablespoon of chia seeds provides you with 19 percent of your daily fiber needs. A study published in 2014 in Nutricion Hospitalaria found that chia helps promote weight l Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

1 / 8 Embrace Superfood Diversity You probably know that salmon is a good choice if you have diabetes because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may improve your body’s ability to respond to insulin. Broccoli is another good choice because it’s high in fiber and may help to reverse the heart damage diabetes can cause. But salmon and broccoli aren’t the only superfoods for a healthy diabetes diet. "Eating a variety of different types of nutrient-dense foods creates the healthiest diet since there is no one food that provides all of the essential nutrients our body needs for optimum health," says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Arizona and dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Diet online program. Liven up your meal plan and enhance your health by adding these seven good-for-diabetes foods to your shopping list. Continue reading >>

Nuts And Diabetes

Nuts And Diabetes

Tweet Nuts provide a number of benefits for people with diabetes. Studies suggest that nuts may even decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. A study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that "nut consumption was associated with a decreased prevalence of selected risk factors for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.[138] This page explores the various benefits of nuts for people with type 2 diabetes. Do different nuts have different health benefits for people with diabetes? Yes. Some nuts have benefits that others don't. Almonds contain a lot of nutrients, particularly vitamin E Walnuts contain healthy omega-3 fatty acids Cashews offers lots of magnesium Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce 'bad' cholesterol Almost all nuts offer something good for people with diabetes. Salted nuts, however, should be avoided. Excessive salt consumption is consistently linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Nuts and cholesterol One of the most prominent characteristics of nuts for people with diabetes is their effect on cholesterol levels. Avoiding high cholesterol levels is essential for people with diabetes, because exposure to high blood glucose levels increases the risk of the arteries narrowing. Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce "bad" cholesterol very effectively. "Bad" cholesterol refers to small, dense particles of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), too much of which can clog the arteries. Almonds, walnuts, pistachios, pecans, and hazelnuts reduce "bad" cholesterol by increasing levels of high-density-lipoprotein (HDL), or 'good' cholesterol. HDL clears out 'bad' cholesterol, thus reducing the risk of heart disease. Nuts and the glycemic index (GI) The glycemic index measures the speed at which your body Continue reading >>

Fenugreek And Diabetes

Fenugreek And Diabetes

Tweet Fenugreek is an aromatic plant that has many uses, both culinary - fenugreek is a key ingredient of curries and other Indian recipes - and medicinal. The plant, which is widely grown in South Asia, North Africa and parts of the Mediterranean, has small round leaves and also produces long pods that contain distinctive bitter-tasting seeds. The leaves are either sold as a vegetable (fresh leaves, sprouts, and microgreens) commonly known as methi, or as an herb (dried leaves), while the seeds are used both whole and in powdered form as a spice. As well as being a popular cooking ingredient, fenugreek has a number of health benefits and is used in both Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine. How does it affect diabetes? Fenugreek seeds (trigonella foenum graecum) are high in soluble fibre, which helps lower blood sugar by slowing down digestion and absorption of carbohydrates. This suggests they may be effective in treating people with diabetes. Multiple studies have been carried out to investigate the potential anti-diabetic benefits of fenugreek. Of these, several clinical trials showed that fenugreek seeds can improve most metabolic symptoms associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in humans by lowering blood glucose levels and improving glucose tolerance. In one study, researchers in India found that adding 100 grams of defatted fenugreek seed powder to the daily diet of patients with insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes significantly reduced their fasting blood glucose levels, improved glucose tolerance and also lowered total cholesterol, LDL or ‘bad’ cholesterol and triglycerides. In another controlled trial, incorporating 15 grams of powdered fenugreek seed into a meal eaten by people with type 2 diabetes reduced the rise in post-meal blood glucos Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Flax, Chia And Hemp Seeds

Flax, Chia And Hemp Seeds

They may be small, but all types of seeds are gaining huge popularity in the food marketplace. Relative to their size, they contain a high proportion of nutrients. That’s no doubt why they are attracting so much interest! Five good reasons to add them to your menu There is no such thing as a miracle food! But seeds can round out, or boost, a balanced diet. Flax, chia and hemp seeds are: A source of protein. They belong to the “meat and alternatives” food group; A source of Omega-3 fatty acids and other fats that are beneficial for your health and heart; High in fibre, which helps control blood glucose (sugar) and blood cholesterol, and promotes weight management through the satiety (fullness) effect, which reduces the feeling of hunger. Fibre also contributes to proper digestive health; Low in carbohydrates, which affect blood glucose (sugar); Versatile! Seeds can add crunch to a wide assortment of dishes and drinks! Flax seeds Flax seeds are oval and flat, and usually dark brown. There is also a yellow variety, called golden flax. You can buy flax seeds whole or ground. In addition to the nutritional benefits mentioned above, flax seeds contain lignans, nutrients with the potential to prevent certain cancers. Whole flax seeds provide 3 g of fibre per tablespoon (15 ml), more than a regular slice of whole-wheat bread. The tough shell of flax seeds make them difficult to digest. When whole, they pass intact through the digestive tract and their valuable nutrients do not get absorbed. Consequently, it is best to grind flax seeds before consuming them. Storage tips If you want to keep flax seeds for an extended period, grind the whole seeds only when you need them. Use a coffee grinder, food processor, or mortar and pestle. Ground flax seeds keep for about a month wh Continue reading >>

Flax Seeds For Diabetes

Flax Seeds For Diabetes

Drug companies hope to capitalize on the fact that the consumption of certain plants appears to lower the risk of diabetes by isolating these plants’ active components for use and sale as pharmacological agents. Though not as profitable, why don’t we just eat the plants themselves? One plant in particular that’s now been tested is flax. We’ve known for 20 years that having ground flax in your stomach can blunt the blood sugar spike from a meal, but it’s never been tested in diabetics–until now. World Health Organization researchers published an open-label study on the effect of flax seed powder supplementation in the management of diabetes. Diabetic subjects took a tablespoon of ground flax seeds every day for a month, and, compared to the control group, experienced a significant drop in fasting blood sugars, triglycerides, and cholesterol, as well as the most important thing, a drop in A1C level. If one’s sugars are already well controlled, though, there may be no additional benefit. How does flax help control blood sugars? Flaxseeds may improve insulin sensitivity in glucose intolerant people. After 12 weeks of flax, researchers found a small but significant drop in insulin resistance, perhaps related to the drop in oxidant stress due to the antioxidant qualities of flaxseeds. The study profiled in my 3-min video Flaxseed vs. Diabetes showing a tablespoon of daily ground flax seeds for a month appears to improve fasting blood sugars, triglycerides, cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c levels in diabetics was a non-blinded, non-randomized small study. If it was some drug they were testing, I’d never prescribe it based on this one study, but this isn’t a drug. It’s just flaxseeds. There are just good side effects, so even if this study was a fluke or frau Continue reading >>

Go Nuts: 6 Seeds And Nuts Which Are Good For Diabetes

Go Nuts: 6 Seeds And Nuts Which Are Good For Diabetes

Home Magazine Diabetes Go Nuts: 6 Seeds And Nuts Which Are Good For Diabetes Go Nuts: 6 Seeds And Nuts Which Are Good For Diabetes Expert-reviewed byAshwini S.Kanade, Registered Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator with 17 years of experience When I was a kid, my mother made me eat a spoonful of dry fruit mixture every day. Based on a recipe from her father, who dabbled in herbal medicine, the mixture was supposed to be good for health and I was supposed to gulp it down, no questions asked. Now I know why it had that tagthe mixture was made up of different nuts and seeds, and research increasingly points at them as being a powerhouse of nutrients such as proteins, vitamins, good fats and minerals. Nuts and seeds are not only good for general health, they also have protective effects for persons with diabetes. Read on to know which are the best nuts and seeds for diabetics. Almonds have been found to reduce both fasting and post-meal blood glucose and insulin levels. They also play a role in reducing oxidative stress, which is the underlying factor in diabetes as well as heart disease.(1) (2) Its best to eat almonds raw and unsalted; you may dry roast them but avoid roasting them in oil. Add shaved or chopped almonds to oatmeal, breakfast cereals, salads and yoghurt. Get daily guidance on what to eat and what not to eat from Diabetes Care Experts with ourPersonalised Home-basedDiabetes Management Package. A 2015 study showed that high blood glucose levels reduce the antioxidant activity of cells; this effect can be reversed by the oil present in walnuts.(3) So taking walnuts regularly has a protective effect against oxidative stress which is responsible for many of the complications of diabetes. Another study found that consuming 30 grams of walnuts (approximately Continue reading >>

Chia Seeds, Diabetes

Chia Seeds, Diabetes

Health-food fans have been talking up chia seeds for years. Now some studies show benefit for these seeds in diabetes. Possibly, chia seeds could help you. Chia is an herb in the Lamiaceae plant family, related to mint and sage. It grows in Mexico and Central America. It is the same plant that became a fad a few years ago as a “Chia Pet.” When you water a Chia Pet, it grows a “fur” and becomes kind of cute. But we’re talking here about eating the seeds and their health benefits. Why is chia getting so much media buzz now? Writing on Diabetic Connect, Jewels Doskicz, RN, explained: “Chia seeds are a total protein” (which not many plants are). “They are high in fiber, rich in healthy omega-3s (actually higher than salmon), and are also high in calcium and antioxidants.” A report in Harvard Health Blog highlights studies of animals in which a high-chia diet led to lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and higher HDL, the good cholesterol. Eating a lot of chia also lowered triglycerides (blood fat levels). In a study of 20 humans with diabetes, one variety of seed called Salba helped participants control blood glucose, reduce blood pressure, and lower C-reactive protein, a major marker of heart disease risk. The study was published in the journal Diabetes Care. The omega-3 oils and antioxidants in chia are healthy, but the fiber content may be a bigger benefit. Chia seeds seem to slow glucose passage into the blood. They fill you up and so reduce appetite. The oils are a good energy source — Aztecs used to carry bags of them to keep going on long walks at high altitude. If you want to try chia seeds, how do you take them? A reader on the American Diabetes Association online support group asked that question and received many answers from fans of chia. One Continue reading >>

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Last year everyone was talking about how good nuts are for diabetes. This year they’re just as good, and new research shows it. If you aren’t eating lots of nuts yet, I’m going to try to get you started. Nuts are great because they are seeds and fruit combined. They are literally full of life. According to Wikipedia, while fruit seeds are separate from the fruit itself, in nuts (according to the botanical definition of the term), the seeds and fruit (which the seed will use to grow if planted) are bound up together, making them among the most nutritious foods on the planet. New research from Louisiana State University found that people who regularly eat tree nuts — including almonds, macadamias, pistachios, walnuts, and cashews — have lower risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Their C-reactive protein (a major marker of inflammation) levels were lower. Their HDL (“good cholesterol”) levels were higher. According to The Huffington Post, the study was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation. Study results often show what the funders wanted them to show, but I tend to believe this one. It appeared in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition and was based on analyzing data from NHANES, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the gold standard for this kind of study in the US. This research confirms dozens of other studies. As Web Editor Diane Fennell wrote in 2011, “Nuts are well known for their nutritional benefits, including their high levels of heart-healthy fats, protein, antioxidants…, plant sterols (natural substances found in plants that can help lower cholesterol), fiber, and minerals.” Nutritionist Amy Campbell explained in this article that nuts are good because they h Continue reading >>

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Author Sidebar: I didn't really care that much for nuts (or seeds) as a snack. I preferred potato chips or pretzels; or, a piece of fruit such as an apple or some grapes. But, after I recovered from my coma and returned to work, I realized that I needed something healthier than potato chips for a snack. :-) I started with salted, roasted peanuts; but, after doing some research, I discovered that roasted nuts tended not to be healthy because the heat caused damaged to the healthy fats within the nuts. In addition, I discovered that peanuts were one of the least healthy nuts. So, I gradually transitioned to raw nuts (no salt, not roasted), mainly almonds, pecans and walnuts; and, sometimes macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds. Beyond helping with blood pressure, cholesterol, weight gain, and other health issues, there are 4 major problems that nuts and seeds help address to have them quality as super fats that help reverse your diabetes. 1. Healthy Snacks: is key to help diabetics maintain proper glucose control, especially between major meals. Eating nuts and seeds make it a lot easier to prepare quick and healthy snacks. 2. Healthy Fats: is one of the areas where many diabetics are lacking from a nutrient content perspective. Nuts and seeds provide monounsaturated fats, oleic acid and Omega-3 fats to help address inflammation, oxidation, weight gain, blood glucose levels and insulin levels. 3. Cravings: is a problem area that nuts and seeds can help with because of their macronutrient and micronutrient content, especially the fat, protein and minerals. 4. Eating Fruits: can be better tolerated when eaten with a handful of nuts and seeds. Why? Because the protein and fat in the nuts and seeds offset the carbs in the fruit. Nuts and Seed | Reverse Diabetes| Othe Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Pumpkin Seeds For Type 2 Diabetes

Benefits Of Pumpkin Seeds For Type 2 Diabetes

Pumpkin seeds, also known as pepitas, are a hallmark of trail mix and of many ‘healthy cereals.’ But a lot of people don’t know just how tasty they can be on their own. These charming, flat little seeds are native to the Americas. They were a very important food to many Native American tribes – and for so many good reasons! With a satisfying crunch and a whole lot of healthy fats and protein to keep you full, they’re a fantastic addition to any diabetic diet and can actually be an integral part of a clean eating plan to help with weight loss. The list of pumpkin seeds’ mind-blowing benefits is long, but we’ll touch on the major benefits of pumpkin seeds for diabetes below. What are Pumpkin Seeds? As their name suggests, pumpkin seeds are scooped out from the insides of pumpkins. You can do this on your own at home by simply scooping out the seeds, washing them thoroughly, then drying them on some paper towel. It’s a rather time-consuming process, but the delicious outcome is totally worth it. Or of course, you can buy the pumpkin seeds at the store, either flavored or unflavored (recommended). And for a small seed, they certainly pack a punch of benefits… Pumpkin Seeds Nutrition Facts Pumpkin seeds are moderate in calories – one quarter of a cup contains 160 calories. But they’re very nutrient-dense, meaning that you don’t have to eat much to get a ton of benefits and stay satiated (full and satisfied) for hours. That same quarter cup also contains 9 grams of protein, 14 grams of healthy fat, and 3 grams of fiber. Best of all, they are a low carb food that contains just 3 grams of carbohydrates per quarter cup. And if you minus the fiber, that's just 1 gram net carbs. It terms of vitamins and minerals, pumpkin seeds contain (per ¼ cup): 74% Reco Continue reading >>

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