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Scrambled Eggs And Diabetes

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

Healthy Eggs For People With Diabetes

Healthy Eggs For People With Diabetes

Eggs can be one of the healthiest foods for people with diabetes to eat. But some people still doubt that fact. And the way many of us prepare them aren’t healthy. One large fresh, whole, raw egg has just 72 calories. It has a bit more than 6 grams of protein, a bit less than 5 grams of fat, and less than one-third of a gram of carbohydrate, according to the USDA’s National Nutrient Database. No wonder that those of us who follow the low-carb lifestyle usually eat eggs. Eggs have complete protein with an optimal balance of the nine essential amino acids. The fats are largely monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. The carbohydrates don’t include any sucrose or fructose. Yet some people are still concerned about the amount of cholesterol in eggs. A large one has 186 mg. The standard diet that our doctors have been recommending for decades is to consume no more than 300 mg of cholesterol a day. However, some of the most advanced medical minds know that the cholesterol we eat has little effect on our blood levels of cholesterol, high levels of which supposedly lead to heart disease. Actually, more than 20 years ago The New England Journal of Medicine reported that an 88-year-old man regularly ate 25 eggs a day and had a normal cholesterol level. Then, the influential Framingham Heart Study found "no relationship between egg intake and coronary heart disease." Our bodies need cholesterol to synthesize bile acids, which are necessary to digest fat. But our bodies keep losing some of these bile acids. "To make up for this, the liver synthesizes approximately 1,500 to 2,000 mg of new cholesterol a day," according to The Great Cholesterol Myth by Jonny Bowden and Stephen Sinatra, M.D, which I reviewed at "Cholesterol Myths" here. As Drs. Bowden and Sinatra write, "Clearly, t Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Scrambled Eggs With Sausage

Scrambled Eggs With Sausage

Serving Size: 1 English muffin half and 1-1/2 cups egg mixture 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium chicken broth 2 tablespoons finely shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese 1 whole grain English muffin, halved and toasted Coat a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray. Preheat skillet over medium heat. In a medium bowl, use a whisk or rotary beater to beat together eggs, broth, and black pepper; stir in sliced sausage. Pour egg mixture into hot skillet. Cook over medium heat, without stirring, until mixture begins to set on the bottom and around edges. With a spatula or a large spoon, lift and fold the partially cooked egg mixture so the uncooked portion flows underneath. Continue cooking over medium heat until almost set; add tomatoes and cheese. Cook about 1 minute more or until egg mixture is cooked through but is still glossy and moist. Serve over toasted English muffin halves. Makes 2 servings (1 English muffin half and 1-1/4 cups egg mixture per serving) PER SERVING: 198 cal., 9 g total fat (3 g sat. fat), 231 mg chol., 524 mg sodium, 16 g carb. (2 g fiber, 4 g sugars), 14 g pro. Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes-friendly Breakfasts

10 Diabetes-friendly Breakfasts

Studies indicate that enjoying a healthy breakfast every morning suppresses hormones associated with elevated blood sugar and improves insulin production. Skipping breakfast (or any meal) is a bad idea for diabetics as it usually leads to an increase in blood sugar levels. Portion control is particularly important as overeating and fasting both lead to significant fluctuations in glucose levels. Ideal breakfast for diabetics include whole grains, fruits, vegetables, lean meats and eggs in moderation. Low-fat cheeses, yogurt and milk can be included in reasonable amounts. Here’s 10 ideas for the discerning diabetic to get the most out of breakfast. Low-Fat Whole Wheat Pancakes – This recipe is egg-free and dairy-free, but it’s anything but flavor-free. Be sure to use a sugar-free syrup and consider replacing the 2 Tablespoons of brown sugar in the recipe with a sugar substitute. A garnish of nuts and dried fruit provides additional taste and energy. While a stack of 5 pancakes is attractive, it’s advised that you keep your portion to just 1 or 2. Microwave Farmers Omelet (In A Cup) – This quick recipe provides all the satisfaction of a diner-style breakfast in a matter of minutes… in a mug. As long as your ham isn’t glazed, it won’t affect glucose levels. The American Diabetes Association recommends having 2 to 5 ounces of protein-rich foods daily. The cheese can be omitted or you could use your favorite low-fat variety. Strawberry Banana Smoothies – When it comes to smoothies, avoid using fruit juices (which can be deceptively high in sugar) and always taste before adding any sweeteners. Most of the time, the fruits you use are plenty sweet on their own. If a recipe specifies yogurt, choose a low-fat or non-fat option. Basic Oatmeal With Nuts – For t Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Scrambled Eggs With Smoked Salmon

Scrambled Eggs With Smoked Salmon

1 container (16 ounces) cholesterol-free egg substitute 2 tablespoons sliced green onions, with tops 1 ounce chilled reduced-fat cream cheese, cut into 1/4-inch cubes Whisk egg substitute and pepper in large bowl. Coat nonstick skillet with nonstick cooking spray; heat over medium heat. Pour egg substitute into skillet and stir. Cook 5 to 7 minutes or until mixture begins to set; stir occasionally while scraping bottom of pan. Gently fold in green onions, cream cheese, and salmon; cook and stir about 3 minutes or just until eggs are cooked through but still slightly moist. Yield: 4 servings. Serving size: 1/4 of recipe. Calories: 100 calories, Carbohydrates: 2 g, Protein: 15 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 10 mg, Sodium: 560 mg, Fiber: 0 g Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

How To Make Scrambled Eggs?

How To Make Scrambled Eggs?

Any time I attempt to cook scrambled eggs for breakfast I get sick from the frustration of the experience. I like the idea of scrambled eggs and would like to eat good scrambled eggs one, the thought of good scrambled eggs is exciting but so far I hate them because they're always either undercooked or overcooked. I hate when all the stupid eggs stick to the pan and when you get pieces of hard eggs ruining the creamy consistency. Eggs are a nutritioun source and a way to add variety I don't want to ignore but ouch it's hard to make something good out of eggs. The only help I can give you is if they are over cooked I put cheese on them. We the willing, following the unknowing are doing the impossible. We have done so much for so long with so little that we are now able to do anything with nothing. I wish you success and happy scrambled eggs on your plate. Any time I attempt to cook scrambled eggs for breakfast I get sick from the frustration of the experience. I like the idea of scrambled eggs and would like to eat good scrambled eggs one, the thought of good scrambled eggs is exciting but so far I hate them because they're always either undercooked or overcooked. I hate when all the stupid eggs stick to the pan and when you get pieces of hard eggs ruining the creamy consistency. Eggs are a nutritioun source and a way to add variety I don't want to ignore but ouch it's hard to make something good out of eggs. [ame="Perfect Scrambled Eggs Breakfast[/ame] From the master. whip till fluffy, cook on low heat often removing from heat - and no salt until they are cooked. I think the trick with scrambled eggs is to use a good non stick frying pan and make sure you spray it with pam, or some kind of butter or oil. I add the eggs when the pan is fairly cool and then slowly raise Continue reading >>

A Home Run Breakfast With Diabetes

A Home Run Breakfast With Diabetes

Seven things I do to beat the hardest meal of the day. With diabetes, the stakes are high in the morning. A well-managed breakfast can dramatically improve my time in zone (70-140 mg/dl) for the rest of the day. Conversely, I might regret poor choices at breakfast three, five, even eight hours later. Unfortunately, the morning brings a perfect storm for blood sugar spikes: high-carb and sugary food options, insulin resistance and inactivity, time demands, stress, and caffeine. Breakfast is also the most likely meal to prompt outrage: “How can I be LOW right now?! I did the same thing yesterday and was HIGH!” This article shares what I’ve learned through diabetes trial-and-error about managing breakfast with diabetes, including many personal examples collected over the past few weeks. The tactics that have had the biggest impact on my diabetes are listed first, though all seven have made a major difference. Click on a tactic in the table of contents below to skip right down to it. At the end of the article, I’ve added two other approaches that might improve blood sugar around breakfast (cut caffeine and reduce stress), but I couldn’t confirm them from my own data. Please send feedback or other tactics by email or on Twitter; I love hearing from readers! And if you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! I’m NOT a healthcare provider. Always confirm changes with a professional, especially when using insulin. Summary 2. Eat non-traditional foods for breakfast: almond flour, nuts and seeds, lentils, etc. 3. Dose insulin 20+ minutes before eating carbs, and wait longer if blood glucose is above target or when eating something really sugary. 4. More breakfast insulin: I use a more aggressive morning correction factor and mor Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Eggs?

Can Diabetics Eat Eggs?

Your nutrition plan is one of the most important and potentially effective treatment tools to manage your diabetes. The objectives of your diabetes diet are controlling your blood sugar and reducing the risk of diabetes-related complications. Eggs may be a concern because they contain large amounts of cholesterol and saturated fats, nutrients that may contribute to your cardiovascular risk. When eaten in moderation, as part of a heart-healthy nutrition plan, you can include eggs as part of your diabetes diet unless your doctor recommends otherwise. Video of the Day Having diabetes increases your risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, characterized by cholesterol-laden deposits in the walls your arteries that obstruct blood flow. Abnormal blood fat levels further contribute to your risk of developing atherosclerosis. Your diabetes health care team will monitor your blood fat levels, including triglycerides and good and bad cholesterol. A heart-healthy diet is recommended for all diabetics to help reduce your risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Eggs are a nutritious food, packed with high-quality protein, vitamins and minerals. The nutritional drawback of including eggs in your diabetes diet, however, is the fat content. A large egg contains approximately 210 mg of cholesterol and 1.6 g of saturated fats; a small egg contains 155 mg of cholesterol and 1.2 g of saturated fats. The good news is that all of the fat in eggs is in the yolk, which means it is easy to separate out. Incorporating Eggs into Your Diet The best option in terms of limiting your fat intake is to use egg whites instead of whole eggs. Egg whites work well for omelets or scrambled eggs. You can also boil whole eggs and remove the yolk after cooking. If you occasionally wa Continue reading >>

Egg-rich Diet Not Harmful In Type 2 Diabetes

Egg-rich Diet Not Harmful In Type 2 Diabetes

Oct. 9, 2014 -- Eggs don't have a bad effect on cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers also found that eating an egg-rich diet for 3 months was linked to better appetite control, and may also provide a greater sense of feeling full. The findings suggest that eating two eggs per day, 6 days a week can be a safe part of a healthy diet for people with type 2, according to Nicholas Fuller, PhD, from the Boden Institute Clinical Trials Unit, University of Sydney, Australia. Fuller presented his findings at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes 2014 Meeting last month. He said the study was motivated by the negative perception widely held toward eggs in the diets of people with type 2 diabetes. Studies have also suggested that, although eating high amounts of eggs is not linked to heart problems in people without diabetes, it may be tied to heart problems in people with type 2, he said. National guidelines on eating eggs and total cholesterol limits are inconclusive, though, and guidelines vary between different countries, he said. For example, in Australia, the National Heart Foundation recommends a maximum of six eggs per week as part of a diet low in saturated fats for healthy people and in those with type 2 diabetes. But in the U.S., guidelines recommend cholesterol be limited to less than 300 milligrams per day for healthy people -- and one egg has about 200 milligrams of cholesterol. Those guidelines also suggest that people with type 2 stick to less than four eggs per week. There's a lack of research into the effects of eating high amounts of eggs in people with type 2 diabetes, Fuller said. The study led by Fuller explored health outcomes in people on a high-egg diet who had either prediabetes or type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Scrambled Eggs? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Scrambled Eggs? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Is scrambled eggs an 2 wholemeal bread a good breakfast?? Type 1 . If you left out the bread, you could have an insulin free breakfast. ( it is for me) no milk and then yes, enough insulin to cover the bread. I am not a low carber and eat as I see fit, some are low carb eaters here others are not I eat low-carb and I need 2U of Humalog or Novorapid for 2 fried eggs and coffee (no sugar, a dash of cream). When I don't eat carbs I still need insulin for protein and fat especially for breakfast. endocrinegremlin Type 1 Well-Known Member Sounds fantastic. Some type ones need to count milk in eggs. I don't. So, a few yummy breakfast will tell you what category you are in. If you need insulin, a few more will work out what. Other than that, bang on and have some for me! I'm incapable of making scrambled eggs without scorching the end out of a pan. Ok tank u folks .. I had them an I had 3 units of insulin to cover it . Me mmol/l was 4.4 at dinner time but If you left out the bread, you could have an insulin free breakfast. ( it is for me) That's not actually true, some type 1's , myself included, have to inject Insulin for protein, tried it once without Insulin and I went into double figures Ok tank u folks .. I had them an I had 3 units of insulin to cover it . Me mmol/l was 4.4 at dinner time but 4.4 is good, as I said in another post in this thread, some type 1's still have to inject just for protein meals, I do. Sounds fantastic. Some type ones need to count milk in eggs. I don't. So, a few yummy breakfast will tell you what category you are in. If you need insulin, a few more will work out what. Other than that, bang on and have some for me! I'm incapab Continue reading >>

Free Diabetic Recipe: Easy Scrambled Eggs

Free Diabetic Recipe: Easy Scrambled Eggs

FREE DIABETIC RECIPE: Easy Scrambled Eggs Scrambled eggs are easy to prepare. However, simplicity is not enough. If youre going to make them, they better be tasty. After all, nothing gets your day off to a bad start quite like scrambled eggs that taste like disappointment. Fortunately, you wont have to worry about being disappointed if you follow this simple yet tasty recipe. There are only four ingredients you need to worry about: eggs, unsalted butter, kosher salt, and ground black pepper. But its not just the stripped-down nature of the ingredients that makes this dish so terrific. Its the uncomplicated preparation of the dish that makes it a winner. Its the perfect way to start your morning. And because it can be created pretty quickly, you dont have to wait for the weekend to enjoy. Calories: 194,Fat: 15 g,Cholesterol: 387 mg,Sodium: 213 mg,Carbohydrate: 1 g,Fiber: 0 g, Sugars: 0 g, Protein: 13 g Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper Beat the eggs, teaspoons of salt, and a few grinds of black pepper together lightly in a medium bowl. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter in a medium nonstick skillet over low heat. Swirl to coat the bottom and sides. Add the eggs and cook slowly, occasionally scraping then up a with a rubber spatula, for about 10 minutes, until the majority of the liquid has thickened and the eggs are soft. Remove the eggs from the heat and gently fold in the rest of the butter. Serve hot. If you want your eggs to be a little firmer, cook them for an extra 2 to 3 minutes. FOR RECIPES LIKE THIS, CLICK HERE TO GET OUR FREE DIABETIC COOKBOOK. Continue reading >>

Healthy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics

Healthy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics

Home News & Facts Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Diabetics Eggs are a versatile food and make an excellent choice for people with diabetes. In fact, the popular breakfast of scrambled eggs and toast is one of the best ways to start the day if you cook them right. The protein, vitamin D and fat in eggs help sustain your energy level and keep you satisfied until lunchtime. You can quickly scramble 1 or 2 eggs in a nonstick pan with a little olive oil. Enjoy your scrambled eggs with a slice of whole-wheat toast. You can also eat 1 or 2 hard-boiled eggs withwhole-grain toast. You can also make an omelet with just the egg whites and lots of spinach and tomatoes for a satisfying and filling breakfast. This will give you a healthy protein-rich treat that also offers an antioxidant boost. The protein in egg whites will help keep you full without affecting your blood sugar. It also slows glucose absorption, which is very helpful if you have diabetes . Cook a handful of spinach and tomatoes in a nonstick pan with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Add the whites of 2 eggs and 1 tablespoon of skim milk. Finally, add some fresh herbs like basil and parsley or some of your favorite spices. Bread is a staple breakfast item, but you must choose your bread wisely if you are diabetic. White bread is made with highly processed white flour and added sugar, thus it can be bad for your blood sugar level. This does not mean that you cannot eat bread. Choose whole-wheat bread for a better nutrient-rich option. The fiber in whole-wheat bread slows digestion, which in turn slows the release of sugars into the bloodstream. Whole-wheat toast spread with peanut butter and topped with thin apple slices makes a great breakfast sandwich. Depending on your preference, you can also use some cucumber, lettuce, to Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Eggs?

Can A Diabetic Eat Eggs?

There is a lot of confusion out there about what a diabetic can eat and can’t eat and eggs happen to be one of those foods, right? You might have been told by someone not to eat them because they are high in cholesterol. Or you might have been told not to eat the egg yolks because of this reason. Well whether you’re a diabetic or not, the answer is no there is no truth in the egg yolk myth. Eggs are High In Nutrients Unfortunately it is one of those old time dogmas that has stuck in the minds of many. One of the reasons behind this is the whole cholesterol myth. We’re told not to eat egg yolks because they are high in cholesterol but egg yolks contain many valuable nutrients and are actually the most nutritious part of the egg, calcium, folate, vitamin A and D. Take a look at the nutrition data for eggs at the bottom of this post. You will see that the yolk does contain all of the fat but it also contains most of the nutritious nutrients that are beneficial for our health. Cholesterol Intake Does Not Equal Higher Blood Cholesterol Yes eggs do contain cholesterol but we do not obtain much cholesterol from the foods we eat. So cholesterol in foods does not automatically equate to more cholesterol in our body. Our liver produces cholesterol internally and in fact things like sugar, which is part fructose, promotes more cholesterol production that an egg. If you want more info about eggs I shared the whole details back in podcast #36. And if you want to know more about fructose metabolism and what occurs then listen to podcast #55. It’s Not About The Fat Either Yes eggs do contain some saturated fat but you’ll notice in the nutrition data below that the predominant source of fat in eggs is monounsaturated fat. Monounsaturated fat is good for us, it helps decrease Continue reading >>

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