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Salt And Diabetes Sugar Level

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

The foods you eat are made of 3 basic nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, and protein. All of these nutrients provide calories (energy) that allow your body cells to function properly. Why do I need a meal plan? A balanced meal plan is important for everyone. If you have diabetes, eating properly balanced meals and snacks is even more important. Food is an important tool that you can use to control diabetes and stay healthy. Carbohydrate counting adds variety to your meals and still allows you to control your blood glucose. Ask a registered dietitian how carbohydrate counting can be incorporated into your lifestyle. Eating a balanced meal plan can help you: Control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Control blood pressure. Maintain a healthy weight or reduce your weight, if you are overweight. Prevent low blood glucose reactions. Reduce the risk of health problems caused by diabetes. How do I get a meal plan? To plan the amount of foods that you eat, you should meet with a registered dietitian who will help you develop a meal plan that is right for you. This plan will be based on your individual health goals. Do I have to count every bite? No. But you will need to be aware of what and how much you are eating and the right portions of foods. The number one goal of the meal plan is to control blood glucose levels with an even distribution of carbohydrates at meals and snacks. Here are some basic guidelines: Follow the meal plan set with your dietitian. Eat a variety of foods every day to get all the nutrients you need. Eat only the amount of food in your meal plan. Eat about the same amount of food each day. Be aware of portion sizes. Do not skip meals. Eat meals and snacks at regular times every day. Distribute meals 4 to 5 hours apart, with snacks in between. If you are taking a Continue reading >>

Will Increased Salt Cause A Diabetic's Blood Sugar To Go Up?

Will Increased Salt Cause A Diabetic's Blood Sugar To Go Up?

Diabetes is one of the fastest growing health concerns in our nation. In 2010, an estimated 18.8 million Americans were diagnosed with diabetes and another 7 million were considered "prediabetic," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you are a diabetic you are also at risk for developing cardiovascular disease and other serious health complications. Learning what foods will raise blood sugar is an important first step in managing your diabetes. Video of the Day Food is divided into three categories -- proteins, fats and carbohydrates -- that provide us with calories and energy. Our bodies need all of these nutrients to function properly. However, carbohydrates are the only sources that have a direct effect on blood sugar. In addition to providing us with energy, food also provides us with vitamins and minerals. Salt is considered a mineral, and while it has many functions in the body, it does not have an effect on blood sugar. However, eating a salty food such as pretzels or potato chips may raise your blood sugar because these foods contain starch – or carbohydrate. But it is the carbohydrate that is raising your blood sugar, not the salt. Any food that has starch, sugar or fiber may be considered a carbohydrate. This would include foods such as rice, bread, pasta, crackers, natural sugars such as those in fruit, and added sugars such as those in desserts. Any type of carbohydrate will raise your blood sugar. While salt does not raise our blood sugar, too much salt can raise your blood pressure. A person with diabetes should work to keep his blood pressure at 130/80 or lower. This will help reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and other complications. When you make healthy meal choices you can help control your diabetes and o Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Low Salt Diets May Be Harmful

Low Salt Diets May Be Harmful

A new study from Belgium found that low- salt diets increase the risk of death from heart attacks and strokes and do not prevent high blood pressure (JAMA, May 4, 2011). The investigators found that the less salt people ate, the more likely they were to die of heart disease. 3,681 middle-aged Europeans with normal blood pressure and no heart disease were followed for 7.9 years. The researchers measured urine excretion of salt to prove how much salt each person took in. Virtually all salt intake during a day can be measured by how much salt ends up in the urine. This study is one of the first to measure a person's salt intake directly, rather than using dietary history which is not very dependable. However, Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard thinks that the study is flawed because investigators based their findings on a single measurement of sodium collected at the start of the study. How could a low-salt diet cause heart attacks? We know that salt restriction can raise blood sugar and insulin levels, while salt loading lowers them (American Journal of Hypertension, July 2001). • A low-salt diet can cause salt deficiency which blocks insulin receptors. • This prevents the body from responding to insulin. • This causes the pancreas to release huge amounts of insulin. • High levels of insulin constrict arteries leading to the heart to cause heart attacks. Salt deficiency can cause the side effects of diabetes Blocked insulin receptors: • prevent insulin from removing sugar from the bloodstream to cause • high blood sugar levels. • This causes sugar to stick to cells. • Once sugar is stuck on a cell, it can never get off, and is eventually converted to a poison called sorbitol that destroys the cell, to cause all the side effects of diabetes: blindness, deafness, Continue reading >>

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

How Does High Salt/sodium Intake Affect A Diabetic? | Diabetes Self Caring

How Does High Salt/sodium Intake Affect A Diabetic? | Diabetes Self Caring

How Does High Salt Intake Affect a Diabetic? How Does High Salt Intake Affect a Diabetic? It is a saying that you should take your life with a pinch of salt. But it cant be said in the case of a person suffering from diabetes. It is a known fact that a diabetic should eat everything in moderation. That even includes salt. Excessive usage of salt increases the risk of cardiovascular attack or heart stroke as well. It is expected from people who are diabetic that should cut the sodium intake in their food and that doesnt mean that they should just a tasteless or plain food. Cutting down sodium means cutting down on the canned vegetables , canned soup, salad dressings and cereals. Though the percentage of sodium mentioned on the label may or may not be right, it is still better to avoid things which contain sodium. Being a diabetic one must always keep an eye on sodium intake as people even experience high blood pressure after a salty food intake. Salt is not known to increase the blood sugar levels but still as a part of a diabetes management program it is best to limit it. Eating salt can lead to high blood pressure levels and which not only increases the risk of heart attacks but also the kidney failure and in severe cases, may even lead to stomach cancer. There are some tips to help you reduce the intake of salt in your diet Findings and Research on Risk of High Salt intake linked to Diabetes There are a few findings from the Institute of Environmental Medicine IMM at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden which have proved to be very beneficial on the subject: For every 2.5 extra grams of sodium, almost 43% increase in the risk of developing type II diabetes has been seen. This consumption is on a per day basis. For those who consumed 7.3 grams per day are at a risk of almo Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Salt Does Not Affect Blood Sugar Levels, So Why Should It Be Consumed In Limited Proportions?

Salt Does Not Affect Blood Sugar Levels, So Why Should It Be Consumed In Limited Proportions?

Salt Does Not Affect Blood Sugar Levels, So Why Should It Be Consumed In Limited Proportions? Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease affecting many Indians and people all over the world. Those with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing health complications impacting the heart, nervous system, and kidneys. Problems like hypertension are twice as common in diabetics and this also increases the chances of cardiovascular diseases. A diabetic person with high salt intake has greater chances of developing hypertension. Although salt does not have an effect on the blood sugar process, excess salt has other implications in a diabetic. The United Nations recently called for a global effort to reduce salt intake. There was a consensus on setting global health targets for the year 2030. One of these was to reduce the daily intake of salt to 5 g/day. A Cochrane review, which forms the basis of this agreement, clearly mentions the health benefits of reducing sodium intake. Hypertension and cardiovascular diseases are both offshoots of diabetes. It is possible to reduce the occurrence of these diseases with the help of a low-salt diet. The Yanomoto Indians of Brazil are one of the few salt-free communities alive. This is because their diet is composed of only that salt which is present in the meat and vegetables they consume; nothing extra. They, thus, have lower blood pressure levels than other ethnic tribes and communities. Indian cuisine, besides being rich and diverse in taste, is also high on salt. The salt to taste phrase becomes a misnomer in the Indian context with its usage being ubiquitous in curries, salads, and other dishes, and reaching extremely high levels in foods like pickles. It is not easy to measure the intake of salt given the vast range and heterogeneity Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Controlling Calories, Fat, Sugar, Carbs & Salt

Diabetes Diet, Controlling Calories, Fat, Sugar, Carbs & Salt

Were all individuals and as dietary needs can vary significantly from one person to another, its important that your diabetes diet is best suited to you. The key to a healthy diet for diabetes is understanding how to control the intake of calories, fat, sugar, carbohydrates and salt. Foods that are good for controlling your blood sugar are also good for all. You should take into account anything from allergies to how active you are. Dont let vegetables be an after-thought for your meals. Vegetables can be positively delicious and are great for adding vibrant color to your plate. Vegetables: provide a great source of vitamins and minerals slow down the absorption of carbohydrate reducing post meal blood sugar level spikes Download a FREE 7 day meal plan with 21 delicious breakfasts, lunches and dinners. Its advised to dedicate half of your plate to non-starchy vegetables. Our advice differs from common advice to base meals around starchy foods, as studies have shown that even lower GI starchy foods can often raise blood glucose levels relatively steeply. Keeping a food diary means noting down everything you eat throughout the day. Taken over a week or a month, they can be useful for reviewing a number of factors of your diet including: How carbohydrate intake varies from day to day Whether youre getting sufficient amounts of fruit and vegetables each day With a bit of commitment, a food diary can be a great way to see whats going well with your diet, as well as identifying any areas for improvement. Energy dense foods are foods that carry a large number of calories in a small portion. Typical examples include foods such as: Often chosen for convenience reasons, these foods can lead to sharp rises in blood sugar levels, usually lack a good source of nutrients, and leave Continue reading >>

Eating And Exercising With Diabetes | Abbott U.s.

Eating And Exercising With Diabetes | Abbott U.s.

The level of sugar in your bloodstream is called your blood glucose level. What you eat and how much you exercise can affect the level positively or negatively. When you have diabetes, it's important to understand how the foods you eat can affect your blood glucose:1 High fiber, starchy carbohydrates, such as whole wheat bread or legumes, are broken down into sugars and absorbed more slowly, helping to keep your blood sugar level smoother throughout the day. Sugary foods, such as soda, juice and sweets, are absorbed quickly. This causes your blood glucose to rise more rapidly. Include five fruit and vegetable servings a day with meals or snacks for fiber and vitamins. Eat a variety of meats, fish and protein alternatives such as tofu. - Choose low-fat options wherever possible. Drink low-fat milk and eat dairy foods such as yogurt, which contain calcium for healthy bones and teeth. Limit your intake of fats, sugars and salt. Don't cut out fats completely, but do keep them to a minimum. Use herbs instead of salt for flavor and cut down on sugar wherever you can. Eat fewer foods that are high in saturated fat. These have been linked to increased cholesterol levels, which can magnify your risk for heart disease and cause weight gain. Cut down on excessive salt as it can cause your blood pressure to rise. Please consult your healthcare professional before making any changes to your diet. The more weight you carry, the more insulin you may need. In addition to eating right, staying fit through regular exercise is a great way to manage diabetes.2,3 Exercise has the following benefits for people with diabetes. With regular exercise, you can: Tone your muscles to make them more sensitive to insulin. Use up energy and lower blood sugar levels. Increase your lung capacity and th Continue reading >>

Increasing Salt Intake Tied To Diabetes Risk

Increasing Salt Intake Tied To Diabetes Risk

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / increasing salt intake tied to diabetes risk article Increasing Salt Intake Tied to Diabetes Risk Want More News? Sign Up for MedicineNet Newsletters! THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of salt consumption may increase an adult's risk of developing diabetes , researchers say. The new study included data from a few thousand people in Sweden. The findings showed that salt intake was associated with an average 65 percent increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes for each 2.5 extra grams of salt (slightly less than half a teaspoon) consumed per day. People with the highest salt intake (about 1.25 teaspoons of salt or higher) were 72 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest intake, the investigators found. The study, led by Bahareh Rasouli of the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, was scheduled for presentation Thursday at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Lisbon, Portugal. The current study didn't look at how salt might increase the risk of diabetes . But the researchers suggested that increasing salt intake may spur insulin resistance , a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes . Or, it could be that salt intake was related to a higher weight. The study can't prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship, only an association. High salt consumption was also associated with a significantly increased risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, a form of type 1 diabetes that develops very slowly and appears in adulthood. The study findings may prove important in efforts to prevent diabetes in adults, the researchers said in an EASD news release. Findings presented at meeting Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Msg: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Msg: What You Need To Know

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a salt of the amino acid glutamate. It’s commonly used to enhance flavor in certain dishes and processed food. MSG is said to invoke a “fifth taste.” This is otherwise known as “umami,” a complex, savory flavor. MSG is found in many fermented sauces and processed meals, sauces, and soups. It can also be found naturally in aged cheeses and meats, and in some ripe fruits, such as tomatoes. MSG is stereotypically associated with Asian foods, especially Chinese, in the United States. This harmful stereotype has encouraged the myth of “Chinese restaurant syndrome,” which is an idea that links eating Chinese cuisines with immediate negative physical effects. However, no convincing research exists to prove that MSG is more harmful in Chinese food than in other foods. Natural glutamates that share a chemical makeup with MSG have never been linked to any negative symptoms. Nonetheless, MSG may be linked to health issues, including obesity and diabetes. Some studies have examined the relationship of MSG and obesity or diabetes, with mixed results. MSG may encourage feelings of fullness. MSG is recognized as safe by the FDA. Some studies suggest no association between MSG and weight gain. A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that MSG may be able to help keep weight in check. Results showed that MSG may increase appetite but also enhance feelings of fullness. Another study followed over 1,000 healthy adults for five years. An inverse relationship was found between MSG and hyperglycemia. This means that a greater intake of MSG may lower the incidence of hyperglycemia, and vice versa. Umami is a well-known and sought-after quality in food. Eating MSG for the “umami” flavor is not harmful by itself. Entire resta Continue reading >>

Electrolytes And How They Help With High Blood Sugars

Electrolytes And How They Help With High Blood Sugars

Ever wonder why when we are severely dehydrated as diabetics or when we are dealing with an extreme high blood sugar our medical team tells us to make sure we replenish our electrolytes? I mean, what is an electrolyte anyway, what are the symptoms of low electrolytes and how can they help us as diabetics or if you’re just out mowing the lawn? Diabetic or not, they are extremely important when it comes to our overall health so let’s take a closer look! When dissolved in fluid, salts tend to break apart into their component ions, creating an electrically-conductive solution. For example, table salt (NaCl) dissolved in water dissociates into its component positive ion of sodium (Na+) and negative ion of chloride (Cl-). Any fluid that conducts electricity, such as this new saltwater solution, is known as an electrolyte solution: the salt ions of which it’s composed are then commonly referred to as electrolytes. So that leads us to the next question… What Are Electrolytes? There are several common electrolytes found in the body, each serving a specific and important role, but most are in some part responsible for maintaining the balance of fluids between the intracellular (inside the cell) and extracellular (outside the cell) environments. This balance is critically important for things like hydration, nerve impulses, muscle function, and pH levels. With the correct body water balance, the electrolytes separate into positive and negative ions. When the body loses water or becomes dehydrated an electrolyte imbalance starts to occur. During heavy exercise, sodium and potassium electrolytes in particular are lost through sweating. To ensure constant electrolyte concentrations in the body, fluids must be regularly consumed. To avoid an electrolyte imbalance which can cau Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What you eat makes a big difference when you have diabetes. When you build your diet, four key things to focus on are carbs, fiber, fat, and salt. Here's what you should know about each of them. Carbs give you fuel. They affect your blood sugar faster than fats or protein. You’ll mainly get them from: Fruit Milk and yogurt Bread, cereal, rice, pasta Starchy vegetables like potatoes, corn, and beans Some carbs are simple, like sugar. Other carbs are complex, like those found in beans, nuts, vegetables, and whole grains. Complex carbohydrates are better for you because they take longer for your body to digest. They give you steady energy and fiber. You may have heard of “carbohydrate counting.” That means you keep track of the carbs (sugar and starch) you eat each day. Counting grams of carbohydrate, and splitting them evenly between meals, will help you control your blood sugar. If you eat more carbohydrates than your insulin supply can handle, your blood sugar level goes up. If you eat too little, your blood sugar level may fall too low. You can manage these shifts by knowing how to count carbs. One carbohydrate serving equals 15 grams of carbohydrates. A registered dietitian can help you figure out a carbohydrate counting plan that meets your specific needs. For adults, a typical plan includes two to four carb servings at each meal, and one to two as snacks. You can pick almost any food product off the shelf, read the label, and use the information about grams of carbohydrates to fit the food into your meal plan. Anyone can use carb counting. It’s most useful for people who take more than one daily injection of insulin, use the insulin pump, or want more flexibility and variety in their food choices. You get fiber from plant foods -- fruits, vegetables, whole g Continue reading >>

How Salt Affects Diabetes - Mindbodygreen

How Salt Affects Diabetes - Mindbodygreen

To say that diabetes and pre-diabetes have become huge problems in the United States is an understatement. These conditions now affect more than one out of two adults in this country. Type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes generally begin with insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that helps bring glucose into our cells. However, when our cells become resistant to insulin, glucose levels in the blood rise drastically, eventually causing pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Research has shown that insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes are likely induced by a diet high in sugar. And insulin resistance may explain why diabetics and prediabetics are at a greater risk of hypertension, also known as high blood pressure. Its been long thought that eating salt is the cause of high blood pressure. In truth, cutting the sugar from your diet may actually fix your insulin resistance and in turn fix your "salt-sensitive" high blood pressure. However, the focus has always been to cut salt intake to lower blood pressure rather than cutting the sugar. And this could be a huge mistake, especially in those with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. In fact, eating more salt may actually improve prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, whereas cutting back on the salt may actually make things worse. In my book, The Salt Fix , I dispel these beliefs and explore why salt has been so unfairly villainized. A low-salt diet may harm those with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes because it can make insulin resistance worse. In fact, low-salt diets in healthy people can cause insulin resistance . Low-salt diets may even cause hypertension by inducing vascular insulin resistance , which is a fancy way of saying a reduced vasodilatory response when insulin acts upon our arteries and blood vessels. High Continue reading >>

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