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Safe At School Diabetes Training

Diabetes Care In The School And Day Care Setting

Diabetes Care In The School And Day Care Setting

Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood (1). There are ∼186,300 individuals <20 years of age with diabetes in the U.S. Based on 2002–2003 data, the rate of new type 1 diabetes cases was 19.0 per 100,000 children and of type 2 diabetes was 5.3 per 100,000 (2). The majority of these young people attend school and/or some type of day care and need knowledgeable staff to provide a safe school environment. Both parents and the health care team should work together to provide school systems and day care providers with the information necessary to allow children with diabetes to participate fully and safely in the school experience (3,4). Federal laws that protect children with diabetes include Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (5), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (originally the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975) (6), and the Americans with Disabilities Act (7). Under these laws, diabetes has been considered to be a disability, and it is illegal for schools and/or day care centers to discriminate against children with disabilities. In addition, any school that receives federal funding or any facility considered open to the public must reasonably accommodate the special needs of children with diabetes. Indeed, federal law requires an individualized assessment of any child with diabetes. The required accommodations should be documented in a written plan developed under the applicable federal law such as a Section 504 Plan or Individualized Education Program (IEP). The needs of a student with diabetes should be provided for within the child's usual school setting with as little disruption to the school's and the child's routine as possible and allowing the child full participation in all school activities Continue reading >>

Safe At School Statement Of Principles

Safe At School Statement Of Principles

Effective School-based Diabetes Management Requires 3 Things 1. Basic diabetes training for all staff. All school staff members who have responsibility for a child with diabetes should receive training that provides a basic understanding of the disease and the childs needs, how to identify medical emergencies, and which school staff members to contact with questions or in case of an emergency. 2. Shared responsibilities for care, with leadership by school nurse. The school nurse holds the primary role of coordinating, monitoring, and supervising the care of a student with diabetes. However, in addition to any full- or part-time school nurse, a small group of school staff members should receive training from a qualified health care professional in routine and emergency diabetes care, so that a staff member is always available for: younger or less experienced students who require assistance with their diabetes management (e.g., administering insulin, checking their blood glucose, choosing appropriate food), and all children with diabetes in case of an emergency (including administration of glucagon). These staff members should be school personnel who have volunteered to do these tasks and do not need to be health care professionals. 3. Self management is allowed in all school settings for students with capacity. Children possessing the necessary skills and maturity to do so should be permitted to self-manage their disease in the classroom or wherever they are in conjunction with a school-related activity. Such self-management should include monitoring blood glucose and responding to blood glucose levels with needed food and medication while utilizing appropriate safety protocols. These principles have been endorsed by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, American Acad Continue reading >>

Back To School With Diabetes: 5 Steps To Keep Your Child Safe At School

Back To School With Diabetes: 5 Steps To Keep Your Child Safe At School

Back to school with diabetes: 5 steps to keep your child safe at school Back to school with diabetes: 5 steps to keep your child safe at school (BPT) For parents of children living with diabetes, back to school season includes more than the usual shopping trips for supplies and clothes. Diabetes management is a 24-hour job. During the school year, your child is spending a large portion of their day in class or participating in extracurricular activities. So its critical that you feel confident that school staff members are trained and able to support your childs diabetes care needs. Most of all, you want your child to feel safe while also having access to the same opportunities as their peers. You are not alone. There are nearly 210,000 children living with diabetes in the United States, according to the American Diabetes Association. Here are a few important steps that parents of children with diabetes can take to make sure their kids are safe at school: 1. Know your rights. Get the facts about legal protections at school for your child. Federal laws protect children with diabetes from discrimination. Also, many states have laws in place that include additional safeguards to ensure your child has what he or she needs to be safe and healthy. Discrimination can come in many forms such as not providing your child with access to diabetes care so he or she may safely participate in extracurricular activities or field trips, and not allowing self-management during the school day. Learn more about your states laws and whether they offer protections and guidance in addition to federal law at diabetes.org/kidswin . More information about existing legal protections is also available at diabetes.org/safeatschool . 2. Have a written plan. Do you have a Diabetes Medical Management Continue reading >>

Health Emergencies: Diabetes Awareness

Health Emergencies: Diabetes Awareness

All staff members should know the basics of diabetes and be ready to respond to ensure the safety of others. This course will cover statistics on the prevalence of diabetes among students, definition of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, signs and symptoms of diabetic complications, an overview of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia and important health care considerations in minimizing diabetes emergencies. Janell Eastman is a district nurse with responsibility for over 8,300 students in 11 schools. Her past experience includes Surgical Nursing, Public Health Case Management and Occupational Health Administration. Janell developed, implemented and now manages the district's Bloodborne Disease Prevention program for all at-risk employees. She has designed multiple presentations now used throughout the district for student and faculty education. Janell graduated from Brigham Young University with a Bachelors degree in Consumer Economics and from Westminster College with a Bachelors degree in Nursing and received her Masters of Education from Cambridge College. Janell Eastman is a district nurse with responsibility for over 8,300 students in 11 schools. Her past experience includes Surgical Nursing, Public Health Case Management and Occupational Health Administration. Janell developed, implemented and now manages the district's Bloodborne Disease Prevention program for all at-risk employees. She has designed multiple presentations now used throughout the district for student and faculty education. Janell graduated from Brigham Young University with a Bachelors degree in Consumer Economics and from Westminster College with a Bachelors degree in Nursing and received her Masters of Education from Cambridge College. Suzan Tibbitts is a school nurse in Utah. She is directly responsible f Continue reading >>

Diabetes Training For Schools & Carers

Diabetes Training For Schools & Carers

Diabetes Training for Schools & Carers Course Contents In this section we look at the two types of diabetes and the symptoms to watch out for in a child. We also explain the long-term effects of poorly controlled diabetes. Here, we discuss the health risks for a child with diabetes. We explain how school staff canrecognise when a child's glucose levels are too low or too high, and how tohelp a childmonitor and control their glucose levels. We also explain what to do in an emergency. This section covers the different types of medication that are used to treat diabetes, including tablets, insulin injections and insulin pumps. It also covers the medical equipment a child uses, and a step by step guide on how to administer an insulin injection. In this section we highlight everything that needs to be considered before and during a school trip including long-stay and overnight trips. This alsoincludes storing medication andwhat to do if a child becomes unwell. Diabetes can have a negative impact on a childs education and well-being if they are not supported. In this section, we cover learning, exams, and how you can help by offering emotional and practical support. This Diabetes Training for Schools & Carers course concludes with a 15 question multiple choice test with a printable certificate.In addition, brief in-course questionnaires guide the user through the sections of the training and are designed to reinforce learning and ensure maximum user engagement throughout. As well as printable user certificates, training progress and results are all stored centrally in your LMS (Learning Management System) and can be accessed any time to reprint certificates, check and set pass marks and act as proof of a commitment to ongoing legal compliance. Your Asthma Training Certificat Continue reading >>

Keeping Your Child Safe At School This Fall

Keeping Your Child Safe At School This Fall

Keeping Your Child Safe at School This Fall Posted on August 1, 2013 by American Diabetes Association Its Aug. 1, which means the crisp fall days of a new school year are fast approaching. While children across the country are picking up new Superman backpacks and Sponge Bob Square Pants lunch boxes, the families of kids with diabetes have a longer list of supplies to gather, tasks to complete and concerns to address. An estimated 215,000 children in the United States live with diabetes. With a chronic disease that must be managed 24/7including the many hours spent at school, on field trips and in extracurricular activitiesthese children are put at serious risk if no one is present at school to help with daily and emergency diabetes care when a school nurse isnt present. In an attempt to reduce these risks and ease parents worry that their child wont have proper diabetes care at school, the American Diabetes Association created its Safe at School campaign . Through this initiative, the Association is dedicated to making sure that all children with diabetes are medically safe at school and have the same educational opportunities as their peers, because no student should run into obstacles simply because of his or her diabetes. We do this by offering the tools needed to provide diabetes care at school, helping families and school personnel to develop plans to prevent problems from occurring and by providing expert help and guidance to families. When problems do occur, we have a team of dedicated lawyers, health care professionals and other advocates ready to find solutions. We know that scrambling for information at this time of year can be hectic, so heres a brief back -to-school checklist for starting your childs year off on the right foot: 1. Stay informed. Federal an Continue reading >>

Communication, Careful Planning Ensure Students With Diabetes Can Succeed At School

Communication, Careful Planning Ensure Students With Diabetes Can Succeed At School

Communication, careful planning ensure students with diabetes can succeed at school Type 1 diabetes remains one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. According to the ongoing SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study, about 200,000 U.S. children and adolescents have type 1 diabetes. By 2050, that number is expected to rise to 600,000, according to JDRF. The numbers mean more students with the disease will be attending more schools, where proper management is critical but confusion about the law and what children are entitled to has led to situations that sometimes result in discrimination or put children with diabetes at risk, experts told Endocrine Today. When a child and his or her family are coping with a new type 1 diagnosis, members of the care team ranging from pediatric endocrinologists to certified diabetes educators and primary care providers often find themselves preparing families for battles on several fronts. In the school setting, to manage type 1 diabetes well and prevent acute and long-term complications, planning, training and ongoing communication are required, Anastasia Albanese- ONeill, PhD, ARNP, CDE, assistant clinical professor in the division of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida, told Endocrine Today. Youre monitoring glucose levels, taking insulin as prescribed, counting carbohydrates, learning to recognize low blood glucose. There are a lot of elements. The broader challenge is that, often if a kid is diagnosed in the middle of the school year, its an abrupt change in that childs life. They may be the only child in their school with diabetes, they have to learn a new routine and, in some cases, the school nurse hasnt cared for a child with diabetes for many years, if at all. There are a whole series of challenges that m Continue reading >>

New Data Shows More Needs To Be Done To Keep Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

New Data Shows More Needs To Be Done To Keep Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

New data shows more needs to be done to keep kids with diabetes safe at school OTTAWA, Nov. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Nearly one-third of Ontario parents arent confident that school staff can keep their kids with type 1 diabetes safe, according to new data released today by the Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) , the Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) . Preliminary results from a survey of Ontario parents of school-aged children with type 1 diabetes show that: More than half of school-aged kids with type 1 diabetes do not have individual care plans; 21% of parents reduce their childs insulin at least once a week because they are concerned about hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) at school; and Nearly 13% of parents go to their childs school at least once a week to monitor their care. About 30,000 school-aged children in Canada (including about 7,000 in Ontario) have type 1 diabetes, a chronic disease where the pancreas no longer produces insulin. Children under five years old are the fastest group of newly diagnosed cases. With about 1 in 300 children currently affected, it is likely that every school will have at least one child with type 1 diabetes. The management of type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 task checking blood sugar, administering insulin, planning meals, and monitoring food intake and physical activity, said Dr. Sarah Lawrence, Chief of Endocrinology at CHEO. Considering that children spend about 30 to 35 hours per week in school, it is imperative that staff be educated, equipped and available to support children. To ensure that school staff are adequately trained, the CPS, along with Diabetes Canada and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group (CPEG) , have launched a series of new educational videos as part of Continue reading >>

Keeping Your Child Safe At School This Fall

Keeping Your Child Safe At School This Fall

Sign up for email alerts on how you can help stop diabetes. Keeping Your Child Safe at School This Fall It's Aug. 1, which means the crisp fall days of a new school year are fast approaching. While children across the country are picking up new Superman backpacks and Sponge Bob Square Pants lunch boxes, the families of kids with diabetes have a longer list of supplies to gather, tasks to complete and concerns to address. An estimated 215,000 children in the United States live with diabetes. With a chronic disease that must be managed 24/7including the many hours spent at school, on field trips and in extracurricular activitiesthese children are put at serious risk if no one is present at school to help with daily and emergency diabetes care when a school nurse isn't present. In an attempt to reduce these risks and ease parents' worry that their child wont have proper diabetes care at school, the American Diabetes Association created its Safe at School campaign. Through this initiative, the Association is dedicated to making sure that all children with diabetes are medically safe at school and have the same educational opportunities as their peers, because no student should run into obstacles simply because of his or her diabetes. We do this by offering the tools needed to provide diabetes care at school, helping families and school personnel to develop plans to prevent problems from occurring and by providing expert help and guidance to families. When problems do occur, we have a team of dedicated lawyers, health care professionals and other advocates ready to find solutions. We know that scrambling for information at this time of year can be hectic, so here's a brief back-to-school checklist for starting your child's year off on the right foot: Stay informed. Federal Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Students who have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes require special management of their health care needs at school. This allows them to be ready to learn and have access to equal educational opportunities as their peers.It ensures that students with diabetes are safe at school. In the long-term, research shows that intensive management of diabetes helps to decrease the complications of the disease. Legal Protections, Rights and Responsibilities $500-$1,500 grants are available to schools seeking to carry out chronic diseaserelated projects in the school or district. School nurses, school counselors, public health nurses, and school administrators are eligible to apply for grants. Certified asthma and/or diabetes educators are also eligible to apply. Additional information can be found on on the School Health Grants page. We would like to acknowledge the contributions of key partners in the development of this diabetes page and its resources: Montana Kids with Diabetes -School Collaborative Montana parents of children with diabetes Montana healthcare providers ofchildren with diabetes American Diabetes Association -National, Regional, and Montana Offices American Diabetes Association, Alaska Area Continue reading >>

Keeping A Child Safe At School

Keeping A Child Safe At School

Single mom Latesha Taylor, like other parents of children with diabetes, simply wants her daughter, Loretta, to have help with blood glucose monitoring, insulin shots, and any emergency glucagon to keep her healthy and able to learn during school. I had heard that Loretta Taylor's mom had a story to tell. The 36-year-old single mother had been caring for her daughter's type 1 diabetes for eight years, so like all parents of children with a chronic illness, she'd had her fair share of difficulties. But this time Loretta's health was in constant risk, and Latesha Taylor felt powerless. And angry. The only problem: I couldn't track her down. A week after setting up a time to talk, I wasn't any closer to understanding why Taylor was going head-to-head with the District of Columbia Public Schools. Sure, Taylor was busy. Busy as in regularly dropping everythingwork includedto pick up her daughter from school when the nurse is absent. (Which she does.) Busy as in searching for a new job every time she's fired from the last one because business owners won't keep an employee who's late or misses work whenever the school nurse goes on vacation. (Which has happened more than once.) I couldn't get in touch with Taylor because life had sucker punched her again: Loretta, 9, was having seizures. Taylor dropped everything to be at her daughter's side as she was whisked away to the hospital, underwent tests, and was examined by doctors. When I finally spoke with her, Taylor was exhausted. She'd left the hospital with an antiseizure medication for Loretta but no concrete diagnosis. She'd lost yet another job and worried how she'd support herself, Loretta, and her 19-year-old son. And she was in the middle of a fight with the Washington, D.C., public school system for what she and the Am Continue reading >>

Keeping Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

Keeping Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

Keeping kids with diabetes safe at school OTTAWAA national initiative aimed at ensuring students with type 1 diabetes are safe at school was launched today by the Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS), the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group (CPEG). Diabetes at School was developed in response to the growing need to support the 30,000 school-aged children with type 1 diabetes, a condition that requires intensive round-the-clock management. Children under 5 years represent the fastest growing group of new diagnoses, meaning schools are increasingly likely to have students with the condition. Children spend half their waking hours in school, so ensuring that their diabetes is safely and well managed is critical, said Dr. Sarah Lawrence, Chief of Endocrinology at the Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and the medical lead for Diabetes at School. To do that, school staff need to be informed and feel confident. We wanted to ensure that Canadian families and educators have access to a range of evidence-informed resources and training. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, the cause of which is unknown. It is not caused by eating habits or inactivity. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas no longer produces insulin, a hormone that helps the body control blood sugar levels. People with type 1 diabetes must check blood sugar frequently, and inject insulin several times daily. While many older students can self-manage, younger students need help with daily tasks like checking blood sugar, administering insulin, and recognizing and treating hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Untreated hypoglycemia can lead to loss of consciousness or seizures. Support for students with diabetes varies across Canada and even within jurisdictions, and many f Continue reading >>

Many Schools Failing On Type 1 Diabetes Care

Many Schools Failing On Type 1 Diabetes Care

Health |Many Schools Failing on Type 1 Diabetes Care Quintarius Monroe, who has Type 1 diabetes, checks his blood sugar before football practice at Woodlawn High School in Birmingham, Ala. Credit Bob Miller for The New York Times With twin boys ready for school, Jason and Jessica Pollard braced for paperwork, parent-teacher meetings and shopping trips for supplies. But they were not prepared for the reception their son, Owen, then 5, received from school administrators. Officials at their neighborhood kindergarten and a nearby private academy said he would not be allowed to attend because he has Type 1 diabetes . The Pollards, doctors in Seattle, were flabbergasted. One headmaster said that Owen would never be accepted because of his disability. It took everything in me not give him the middle finger, said Dr. Jessica Pollard, a pediatric oncologist. The Pollards are hardly the first family to face this kind of discrimination. Too many schools are failing to provide the growing number of students who have Type 1 diabetes with the routine care they need, such as insulin shots or blood sugar monitoring, federal regulators and diabetes experts say. And often, parents do not know they have the legal right to insist on it. The incidence of Type 1 diabetes among children has increased by 21 percent in recent years. In 2009, an estimated 167,000 children had the disease, according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In nearly 400 cases since 2011, parents have brought complaints to federal authorities about schools that decline to care for these students. Experts say the number vastly understates the problem in public and private education ( Share your own experience here) . Many children have been barred from attending their zoned schoo Continue reading >>

Safe In School | Diabetes Uk

Safe In School | Diabetes Uk

12-year-old Jennys life was put in danger after a severe hypo at school, because her school didnt know they needed a plan to care for children with medical conditions like Type 1 diabetes. No child should have to suffer in school like Jenny did. Thats why, together with other members of the Health Conditions in School Alliance , were backingher mother Louises call for this to change as part of our Safe in School campaign. Almost 50,000 people signed the petition, which we handed over to Parliament on 23 October 2017. On the day more than 100 parents and children affected by Type 1 diabetes and other medical conditions joined us in Westminster, pressing their MPs to get behind the campaign - watch our video below. There areonemillion children in school right now, managing serious medical conditions. Sadly many of them are not getting the care they need in school because schools are not aware of whats expected. We asked schools across the country if they had a medical conditions policy in place, as they are legally required to. Shockingly only onein 10 could show that they had an adequate policy. We want to see three simple changes that would make a big difference. 1. We want Ofsted to tell their inspectors to routinely check school's medical conditions polices as part of their regular inspections. 2. We want the Department for Education to change their guidance, so that all schools need to publish their medical conditions polices on their website. 3. We want the Department for Education to do more to help schools understand their responsibilities and put together quality medical conditions policies. Laws protecting children with Type 1 diabetes and other medical conditions was only introduced in 2014 due to the determination of campaigners like you. Now children need yo Continue reading >>

More States Pass Safe At School Laws

More States Pass Safe At School Laws

STILLFX/Thinkstock (chalkboard); xubingruo/Thinkstock (USA illustration) Urbana, Maryland, social studies teacher Matthew Ferrante recalls the day earlier this year when he found out that at least six students were crowded into the school nurses office managing their type 1 diabetes a situation that couldve led to the delayed treatment of a dangerous low. Ferrante, who also has type 1 diabetes, says circumstances like these moved him to join other American Diabetes Association Safe at School advocates to press for change. Their efforts paid off. In April, Maryland became the latest state to pass legislation that takes a step forward in ensuring that students with diabetes have improved access to care at school. Gov. Larry Hogan of Maryland has signed the measure. It requires that guidelines for monitoring and treating blood glucose levels at school, among other issues, be implemented. Ferrante, the Maryland state advocacy chair for the Safe at School campaign, says he expects the bill to allow capable students to self-manage their care in the classroom or on school grounds without having to go to the nurses office. Training additional staff, he says, will help kids get the prompt care they need to manage their diabetes safely when the nurse is unavailable. Safe at School advocates like Ferrante push for regulation, legislation, and policy changes that ensure students with diabetes have the support they need to fully participate in school, in after-school activities, and on field trips. These other states have recently passed laws improving access to care for students with diabetes: PennsylvaniaIn July 2016, Gov. Tom Wolf signed into a law a bill that allows school staff to be trained to provide routine and emergency diabetes care and lets capable students self-manage t Continue reading >>

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