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Sad Diabetes Poem

John Donne - John Donne Poems - Poem Hunter

John Donne - John Donne Poems - Poem Hunter

John Donne - John Donne Poems - Poem Hunter The Sun Rising Busy old fool, unruly Sun, Why ... Air And Angels Twice or thrice had I loved thee,Before I ... John Donne was an English poet, satirist, lawyer and priest. He is considered the pre-eminent representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, especially compared to that of his contemporaries. Donne's style is characterised by abrupt openings and various paradoxes, ironies and dislocations. These features, along with his frequent dramatic or everyday speech rhythms, his tense syntax and his tough eloquence, were both a reaction against the smoothness ... more Click here to add this poet to your My Favorite Poets. ''To be no part of any body, is to be nothing.'' John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. letter, Sept. 1608, to Sir Henry Goodyer. Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John H... ''When one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language.'' John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions Upon Eme... No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main.... Any man's death diminishes me because I am involved in Mankind; and therefore never send to know for... John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions Upon Eme... ''But I do nothing upon myself, and yet am mine own executioner Continue reading >>

Poem About Daughter Fighting Diabetes

Poem About Daughter Fighting Diabetes

My daughter was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at the age of 13. She is now 28. We have been through some rough times with ketoacidosis and I have known what it is like to have a doctor say, "We are doing all we can." On October 5, 2013, she will have gone one year without a hospital visit. She is struggling with some of the complications of diabetes in her digestive system and it is becoming harder for her to control her blood sugars. This poem is about my admiration for her. My life was normal. Then one day I just got sick. My energy levels were low. I didn't want to eat. I was going to the bathroom a lot, and I slept longer than I used to. My mom knew that... Subscribe by Email for your weekly dose of Loving, Healing and Touching poetry! Poem Encouraging You To Look On The Bright Side Has this poem touched you? Share your story! My life was normal. Then one day I just got sick. My energy levels were low. I didn't want to eat. I was going to the bathroom a lot, and I slept longer than I used to. My mom knew that something was wrong, so she finally took me to the doctor. In the E.R. they checked my blood glucose level, and it was way over 900. I was admitted to the hospital for 2 days. The doctors told my mom that I was in DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis). My mom came back into the room after talking to the doctors. She gave me a hug and told me it was going to be okay, but I could see it in her eyes it was bad news. I was hooked up to an insulin drip. I had to go to see an endocrinologist for my diabetes. At first I was scared, but aren't we all. My whole life began to change. My family was my support. They helped me cope with my highs and lows. But now I'm 16, and I couldn't be happier with my life. I play on the varsity soccer team at my school and I run track. I hope Continue reading >>

Me And My Diabetes | Diabetes Uk

Me And My Diabetes | Diabetes Uk

Here's where you'll find out all you need to know to stay healthy and still have fun. Find out how to get your glucose levels right, how to deal with your family, friends and teachers, and what you can eat (PS that includes chocolate!). There's lots of info here and you don't have to take it all in at once. But you and Mum and Dad can keep coming back for all the info you need. "I have an insulin pump so it's a bit easier to handle my diabetes."Rosie "I got Type 1 diabetes at the age of 5 years old, and I'm 8 years old. It's amazing how time goes quickly and you forget you have even got it!" Olivia "I've been diabetic for four years, and I was scared at first but I just want to say that to anyone who has just found out, it does get better! Even if you get really annoyed at your mum or dad they are trying to help even if it doesn't seem like it at the time. Hope it helped."Erin "I've had Type 1 diabetes for 9 months and this page has helped me to become the person I was before I became diabetic."Cara "Hello, My name is Isaac. I'm 6 years old and I developed diabetes 7 weeks ago, just before my 6th birthday. I'm still getting used to having my injections but have been really brave and even got a certificate. I also have a buzzy to make my injections hurt less. You can choose either a black bug, a ladybird or a bee, but I chose the ladybird." Isaac "Hi I'm Charlotte and I have diabetes and I got it when I just turned two and now I'm 11, nearly 12. My dad had it and my auntie and nan got it even my Nan's cat Ginger has diabetes. I'm happy most of the time, but when I'm ill I can be down.My parents say they are very proud of me because I deal with my diabetes and I try my hardest to keep it in range." Charlotte "Well organised and straight forward, well explained and good i Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Poem

A Diabetes Poem

Thanks to Abby the black lab who has taken time off from her busy day of napping to share some thoughts about diabetes. A Diabetes Poem by Abby the Black Lab I don’t know fancy poetry, But I do know how to rhyme. Diabetes is a pain-in-the-butt All of the time. I’m not a smart alert dog. I don’t smell lows or highs. But I do wish that diabetes Would take a big good-bye. At eighty pounds I’m big and black And always need a hug. I’m just a big old lapdog And cuddly like Lancet the Pug. It’s true that I am just a dog. Dog biscuits make drool. I am so glad to not count carbs Diabetes is so cruel. I’m starting to get old and stiff. My joints are getting sore. It’s sad to know that one gray day DSMA walks will be no more. Glucose meters come and go. Diabetes seems to stay. It’s faithful like a big black dog And never goes away. If I could bark and scare away Type 1 and Type 2 likewise. I’d ask for heaping bowls of food And not the Nobel Prize. So diabetes, please be cured And don’t come back another day. You’re not a friend like cats and dogs, That’s all I have to say. For more diabetes humor: photo credit: testguessandgo.com and adobe stock photo What is Type 2 Diabetes? The Basics Life with Type 2 Diabetes: Emotions & Mental Health: Family, Friends & Relationships Holidays Continue reading >>

A Mothers Poem | Children With Diabetes Forums

A Mothers Poem | Children With Diabetes Forums

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. I'm not sure who originally wrote this but I found it touching..... I am the mother of a diabetic child. I dont know what its like to go to sleep at night and know for certain my child will wake up in the morning. I dont know what its like to sleep the whole night through without waking up to do blood tests on my sleeping child. I dont know what its like to prepare a meal without a calculator, measuring cups, and a gram scale. I dont know what its like to drop my child off at school and know she will always be in the charge of someone who knows how to take care of her. I do know what its like to force feed sugar in the middle of the night knowing I am sacrificing my childs teeth to save her life. I do know what its like to draw up insulin at 2 am and pray to God Im not too sleepy to make a fatal error in judgment, technique or calculation. I do know what its like to sit underneath the dining room table holding my sobbing child, explaining to her, No, we cant take a break just this one time. while I inject insulin into her already bruised arm. I do know what its like to walk away from the pharmacy counter with an armload of supplies and realize Ive just gone through another box of 200 syringes. I do know what its like to help my child march bravely past the juice and cookies at the school reception that was supposed to be her reward for achieving Student of the Month. I do know what its like to look into my childs eyes and tell her she has an incurable disease and explain to her what that means, And then to be comforted by her when Im the one who cant stop sobbing. I do know what its like to love and cherish my child every minute of every day, To know that I may s Continue reading >>

Baker Heart And Diabetes Institute - Home | Facebook

Baker Heart And Diabetes Institute - Home | Facebook

Your 30s is a busy and exciting time, building a career, developing relationships and even a career. It is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle and try not to overindulge in alcohol. Instead of opening your whole evening up to drinking, why not just allocate dinner as the time you enjoy a drink? For tips visit: Did you know? Heart disease and diabetes are among the biggest health problems facing the Western world. Australians are living longer, but our quality of life is seriously threatened by a modern day health crisis. Each new group of Bright Sparks scientists go on to excel in their chosen field, help train others, and bring about powerful changes and developments in medical research that ultimately improves the health of all Australians. Join our Bright Sparks community today and join the movement to end heart disease and diabetes: Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes but it is not a direct cause. Some people who are overweight may not develop type 2 diabetes while some people who are of a healthy weight will develop type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is not preventable and not associated with weight, physical inactivity or any other lifestyle factors. We are testing whether exercise training during chemotherapy is helpful in protecting heart function and maintaining exercise capacity. The chemotherapy medications used for breast cancer treatment are important for achieving a cure but a potential side effect is that they can affect heart function and fitness. We are interested in whether an exercise program conducted during and following anthracycline chemotherapy can reduce the risk of functional disability. If you are interested in participating or would like further information, visit: Continue reading >>

A Short Poem About Type 1 Diabetes

A Short Poem About Type 1 Diabetes

A 13-year old uses verse to express feelings about life with T1D. Cassandra G is 13-year old who has been living with T1D for three years. She wrote this poem about her experiences. Waking up early morning, all you hear is the little girl yawning. She does not get up to train for the Eagles, but instead she takes irritating needles. When the sound of silence slaps her class at school, her mashie goes off and that is not cool. which people thinks it is a phone with a wake-up alarm. it is hard to control her sugar level, when it just cant decide. Waking up in the middle of the night, she wakes up to an open light. Her mum gives her sugary food, at least that puts her in a good mood. She can find her way through the darkest cave. Just because she is different, she is still the same And whoever puts her down, they are the one to blame. Do you have an idea you would like to write about for Insulin Nation? Send your pitch to [email protected] . Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here . Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation , our sister publication. Continue reading >>

The Philosophy Of Composition

The Philosophy Of Composition

Edgar Allan Poe was an editor, journalist, poet, literary critic, and short story writer. Known for his gothic tales and psychological dramas, his stories include The Cask of Amontillado, The Fall of the House of Usher, and The Tell-Tale Heart. In 1845 he published The Raven and Other Poems. Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1809, the son of an actress. Orphaned in 1811, he moved to Richmond, Virginia, to live with his adoptive family. He briefly attended the University of Virginia before leaving to join the Army and attend West Point Military Academy; he was expelled from West Point after a year. Poe worked as a journalist and editor in New York, Baltimore, and Richmond. Despite his success as a writer, he lived in poverty. He suffered from alcoholism, depression, and possibly diabetes. In 1836 Poe married his cousin Virginia Clemm, and they remained together until her death from tuberculosis in 1847. After giving lectures in Norfolk and Richmond, Poe died in a Baltimore hospital in 1849; the cause of his death is not known. In his essay The Importance of the Single Effect in a Prose Tale, Poe argued for his belief in the unity of effect in a short story. In The Philosophy of Composition, Poe turned his attention to poetry. The essay is a methodical account of how he came to write The Raven. He describes the deliberate choices he made in composing the poem, and the choices reveal his aesthetic. He advises brevity to communicate the essential effect of a piece. Beauty is the province of his work, and melancholy . . . the most legitimate of all the poetical tones. Poe discusses theme, setting, sound, and the merits of refrain. And, in the composition of The Raven in particular, he describes how he arrived at the figure of a raven instead of a parrot. Charles Dic Continue reading >>

I Am An 11 Year Old Girl With Type 1 Diabetes

I Am An 11 Year Old Girl With Type 1 Diabetes

The reason I wrote this poem because it helps me let out a lot anger and sadness. Because I am an 11 year old girl with type 1 diabetes. Also my mom has sickle cell anemia and she smokes. And the sad about it is that she says that she wants to be in my life but always out with her friends and never home with me. I also wrote this because I feel that God put me on this earth to make fun of me. But when I think of it I know he put me on this earth for a reason. I love that now it gives me the courage to feel comfortable because God chose me for a reason. I'm also an 11 year old girl, and I'll be faithful and am blessed that I'm still on the Earth. Continue reading >>

Remembering 'tinker To Evers To Chance'

Remembering 'tinker To Evers To Chance'

They are, arguably, the best-known Chicago Cubs of all time. And though Joe Tinker , Johnny Evers and Frank Chance last played together in 1912 indeed, all have been dead more than 60 years -- their names live on among baseball fans. "Baseball's Sad Lexicon" first appeared in print 100 years ago next month. It was written by Franklin P. Adams, a New York Evening Mail columnist who had been born in Chicago (and was a Cubs fan). A little background: Back in Teddy Roosevelt's day, the Cubs were a dynasty. They won National League pennants in 1906, '07, '08 and '10, and the World Series in 1907 and '08 (their last world championship, for those keeping score at home). Anchoring their infield were shortstop Joe Tinker, second baseman Johnny Evers and first baseman Frank Chance, the best double play combination of the day. Their exploits against the arch-rival New York Giants are what inspired Adams to write the poem: These are the saddest of possible words:"Tinker to Evers to Chance."Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,Tinker and Evers and Chance.Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,Making a Giant hit into a doubleWords that are heavy with nothing but trouble:"Tinker to Evers to Chance." Interestingly, Adams considered the poem something of a throwaway. In a 1946 letter, he explained: "I wrote that piece because I wanted to get out to the game, and the foreman of the composing room at the Mail said I needed 8 lines to fill. And the next day (an editor) said that no matter what else I ever wrote, I would be known as the guy that wrote those 8 lines. And they weren't much good, at that." The notion that Adams jotted down the eight lines so he could run off to see the Cubs play the Giants is also incorrect. The Cubs didn't visit New York that month. In fact, the Giants Continue reading >>

I've Got Diabetes

I've Got Diabetes

I've got diabetes, I'm injecting every day. I've got diabetes, And it just won't go away. I've got diabetes, And it makes me really mad. I've got diabetes, And, well, some days I'm just sad. I've got diabetes, And I really don't know why Nobody can tell me, That's why, sometimes, I just cry. But I've got diabetes, And I still have fun with mates. And despite my diabetes, I occasionally eat cakes. Even with my diabetes, I play all the sports I like. And forgetting diabetes, I go riding on my bike. So I've got diabetes, And I will not let it win. I've got you diabetes, But I'll always keep my grin. ©2013 Gareth Lancaster Something Interesting... In January 2013 my son, who's 9, was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes and I wrote this poem to cheer him up. It's a big thing for him to deal with but he's doing a grand job of it and doing well. And yes, as we promised he would, he still enjoys all the sport he likes playing, spending time with friends and doing all the things he used to do. Continue reading >>

A Mothers Promise

A Mothers Promise

Happy Mother's Day to all you wonderful moms...You Rock! A poem in memory of the author, Gary Hempleman, for all children with diabetes. She walks down the hallway in silence so deep, Keep watch over him, as her little one sleeps. With meter in hand, she opens his door, Making sure not to wake him as she crosses the floor, She sits on his bedside and brushes his hair, As he dreams of shooting baskets, without a "D" care. She holds his hand softly; his fingers so small, As she watches and wonders why "D" came to call. While she watches him sleeping, so peaceful and warm, The forces inside him fight a constant "D" storm. Will he ever be free of shots and blood testing? She sits and she wonders as she watches him resting. The beep of the meter breaks the silence of the night; A small drop of blood tells if everything's right. The seconds count down to the final display, I hate this damn meter; i want to throw it away. The number is fine, one down, a lifetime to go, As he turns in his sleep, will he ever know? Why does this "D" happen to someone so small? My son is my hero, but my baby most of all. She turns at his doorway, looking back one more time, It's a nightly routine of the very worst kind. She walks down the hallway and time passes by, As she sits in dark silence and quietly cries. I have to stay strong, and for him i will fight, We'll battle this "D" with all of our might. I'll teach him to master and conquer this foe, This "D" will not stop him, i promised him so. Gary 2001 Visit Gary's website and read more of his poetry www.diabetespoetry.com. Happy Mother's Day to all you wonderful moms...You Rock! A poem in memory of the author, Gary Hempleman, for all children with diabetes. She walks down the hallway in silence so deep, Keep watch over him, as her little one Continue reading >>

Sylvia Plath: Her Life And Importance To American Literature And History

Sylvia Plath: Her Life And Importance To American Literature And History

Sylvia Plath: Her Life and Importance to American Literature and History Sylvia Plaths importance in American history is derived from the literary excellence of her writing, and her works show the plight of mid-twentieth century women. Plath's significance comes from her role as a poet and the ways in which her writing opened the door for exploration of a feminist-martyr to patriarchal society, as well as the treatment of psychiatric patients. As a post-World War Two confessional poet, or a poet who wrote based on a personal attachment to her work, Plaths life can be explored through her poetry and stories. By aligning the works of Sylvia Plath alongside the events in her life, one is better able to understand the poet's importance to American history. Before the age of eight, Plath led a socially normal life. Born October of 1932, she grew up in a strongly academic family environment in Winthrop, Massachusetts. Winthrop and the surrounding areas appeared specifically in Plath's poem, Point Shirley, which represents the town with bleakness. Her father, Otto Plath, was a professor of Biology and her mother, Aurelia Plath, was short-hand teacher. Plath had her first poem published in The Boston Herald in 1940 when she was only eight, and this would be the beginning of her career as a poet. Also in November of that year, Plaths father died from surgical complications related to his late-diagnosed diabetes. The poet's paternal struggles appear in many of her poems such as The Colossus, The Beekeepers Daughter, and Daddy, where Plath writes, saying, I have always been scared of you.1 Plath did not attend the funeral, and the poet only visited Otto Plath's grave once nineteen years after his death. Sylvia's mother, Aurelia Plath, accepted a job at Boston University. They mov Continue reading >>

Inside The World Of Type 1: A Mother’s Poem

Inside The World Of Type 1: A Mother’s Poem

This poem was written by Michele Grima whose daughter, Zoe, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes two years ago. This is something I wrote at 3 a.m. on a difficult night about a month after we came home from the hospital. I am a world away from the sadness I felt that day, and I know we will overcome any obstacle that comes our way. - - Love is, love is all. It brings you to your knees sometimes. Although you may not fall, your heart feels the break, and there is no greater pain than that of looking into a child's eyes, full of fear, and watching helplessly as they miss their old life – a life with no pricks to their fingers, a life with no needles, a life with no disgusting smell of insulin, a life without looking at their own blood 10 times a day, a life without highs and lows. You know their little bodies are struggling to work, and you want to reach deep inside and fix what has gone wrong, but it's not in your power. A life when they could go on their own and take whatever they want to eat without counting every carb, and there is no way but acceptance and hope for a cure – one that, in this often cruel world, your intelligent brain knows may never come. Money will come before others' pain, and children are just statistics to pharmaceutical companies and the elite of the world, and that doesn't only ring true for diabetes but also for cancer and many other sicknesses these poor kids have to endure – sicknesses that rob them of their childhood. All mothers were put here to protect their babies and fix their problems, and when you can't, you begin to look at yourself in the mirror, and the frustration and heartache leave you feeling totally hollow inside, and you end up feeling like a failure as a protector. What if? What if I hadn't seen the signs, what if I had c Continue reading >>

Poems As Maps: An Introduction

Poems As Maps: An Introduction

In the traditionof summer reading, we present a special series onpoems that can be read as maps, whose lines trace and transgress boundaries of identity and experience. Read the poems here . We use maps to find our way in the world, to locate ourselves in relation to others, to measure distance and record change. Maps are inherently contextual, which can make them seem old-fashioned in a culture that values immediacy, one that operates through image and spectacle. The image is a mask, a face, a front, an arrow. The map is its opposite, not an index of the world but a way of relating to it. This essay is a map that situates you and me in relation to the world as I know it, in St. Paul, Minnesota, in the summer of 2017, after the acquittal of the police officer who killed Philando Castile, a black man driving home from the grocery store. It is also a map to this series in Places Journal a constellation of poems that marks a brief intermission in the usual flow of articles on buildings, cities, and landscapes. I was 27 years old when my mother died suddenly. She was 49. After the funeral, my youngest sister told me about a dream she had right before our mothers passing. In the dream, my sister was alone in our childhood home on the south side of Chicago, and a black bird flew around the living room, desperate to escape. Every time the bird hit the wall or ceiling, great bursts of light would appear at the points of impact. Then, my sister said, she woke up. When I first discovered the Lucille Clifton poem, for the bird who flew against our window one morning and broke his natural neck, I couldnt believe she had put that bird into a poem: alive and then dead. Growing up as a black girl, living with racism, sexism, and poverty, I was used to hearing the world speak through Continue reading >>

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