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Running Diabetes Prevention

Exercise Dose And Insulin Sensitivity: Relevance For Diabetes Prevention.

Exercise Dose And Insulin Sensitivity: Relevance For Diabetes Prevention.

1. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 May;44(5):793-9. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31823f679f. Exercise dose and insulin sensitivity: relevance for diabetes prevention. Dub JJ(1), Allison KF, Rousson V, Goodpaster BH, Amati F. (1)Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. PURPOSE: Exercise improves insulin resistance and is a first line for theprevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. The extent, however, to which these responses are dose dependent is not known. The purpose of this study was toexamine whether exercise dose was associated with improvements in insulinsensitivity after 4 months of exercise training in previously sedentary adults.METHODS: Fifty-five healthy volunteers participated in a 16-wk supervisedendurance exercise intervention with a pre/postintervention design. Insulinsensitivity was assessed by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, peak oxygen uptakeby a graded exercise test, and body composition by dual-energy x-rayabsorptiometry. The exercise intervention consisted of three to five sessions perweek with a minimum of three sessions supervised. A ramped exercise prescription protocol was used to achieve 75% of peak HR for 45 min per session. Exercisedose, expressed as average kilocalories expended per week, was computed as theproduct of exercise intensity, duration and frequency.RESULTS: Improved insulin sensitivity was significantly related to exercise dose in a graded dose-response relationship. No evidence of threshold or maximaldose-response effect was observed. Age and gender did not influence thisdose-response relationship. Exercise intensity was also significantly related to improvements in insulin sensitivity, whereas frequency was not.CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies a graded dose- Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes -- Prevention

Understanding Diabetes -- Prevention

Because of the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes, you can do a great deal to reduce your chance of developing the disease by slimming down if you are overweight. This is especially true if diabetes runs in your family. In fact, studies have shown that exercise and a healthy diet can prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in people with pre-diabetes -- a condition that often develops prior to full-blown type 2 diabetes. The medications metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon), and acarbose (Precose) have also been shown to be effective in delaying or preventing type 2 diabetes in those at risk. In someone who already has diabetes, exercise and a nutritionally balanced diet can greatly limit the effects of both types 1 and 2 diabetes on your body. In diabetics, stopping smoking is one of the best ways to help prevent the damaging effects of diabetes. If you smoke, quit; smoking dramatically increases the risk of heart disease, particularly for people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Is Walking Or Running Better At Lowering My Diabetes Risk?

Is Walking Or Running Better At Lowering My Diabetes Risk?

Is walking or running better at lowering my diabetes risk? Which exercise is best for blood sugar, walking or jogging? The answer might surprise you . . . In a recent study, walking briskly for 30 minutes five times a week appeared to be more effective than jogging when it came to lowering diabetes risk. Okay, so walking definitely has it merits. But so does running -- and swimming, and hiking and biking. The kind of exercise that is best for you is something that you will do consistently -- whatever it may be. Just make sure you cover all the bases; you need a mix of strength, stamina and flexibility training in your routine. As for walking vs. running: Both improve insulin sensitivity, which helps your body use glucose efficiently. But in a study, walking improved pancreatic function more than running did for a group of middle-aged, overweight, sedentary folks with high cholesterol. Why? Researchers suspect moderate-intensity exercise ramps up fat burning more than vigorous-intensity exercise -- and that could explain the results. Continue reading >>

Walking Vs. Running - Diabetes Self-management

Walking Vs. Running - Diabetes Self-management

To walk or to run for exercise? This is most likely not a dilemma that most people face. After all, most Americans get very little exercise , and people who dont even walk very much whether out of habit or because of physical limitations are probably unlikely to suddenly take up running. But if youre in decent physical shape and already have a walking routine, you may be wondering what, if anything, you would gain by switching from walking to running. Two recently published studies help answer this question. The first study , published in April issue of the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, aimed to find out how runners and walkers compare when it comes to weight loss. Based on questionnaires that 15,237 regular walkers and 32,216 runners each completed twice, with six years in between, the study found that walkers tend to expend less than half as much overall energy through exercise as runners do perhaps not a surprising finding. But what may be surprising is that the study also found greater benefits from running than walking when the same amount of energy was expended. As an article on the study at Physicians Briefing notes, both male and female walkers were found to expend less energy than runners through exercise at the beginning of the study, and they were also significantly heavier than runners on average. However, the study tried to overcome these differences by using a standard measure of energy expenditure called metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-hours when comparing walkers with runners before and after the six-year period. It turned out, though, that even with the same level of energy expended, running translated into better weight control than walking did. Each MET-hour of exercise per day was associated with a greater drop in body-mass ind Continue reading >>

Preventing Prediabetes: Is Diet Or Exercise More Important?

Preventing Prediabetes: Is Diet Or Exercise More Important?

Diet may have a slight edge over exercise when it comes to losing weight, but pairing that healthy diet with a regular exercise routine is key if you’re looking to prevent prediabetes. According to a study published in the Summer 2014 issue of The Permanente Journal, an estimated 34 percent of adults in the United States have prediabetes, which means their blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to qualify as full-blown type 2 diabetes. You can chalk some of that up to genetics, but your chances of developing diabetes aren't based on family history alone. Think of it this way: You might inherit a predisposition to the disease, but then something in your environment has to trigger it, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. “While certain genetic factors influence the likelihood of developing insulin resistance, it’s the lifestyle factors — what we do about it — that determine whether metabolic health worsens or stays intact,” says Theresa Link, RD, CDE, with Virta Health in San Francisco. That means prediabetes is preventable — so long as you make healthy choices. This leads us to the age-old question: Does exercise or diet play a bigger role in keeping you healthy? The Case for a Healthy Diet According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the single most important way to prevent diabetes is to control your weight. Research has shown that losing 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can lower your chances of developing the disease by 58 percent, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine. And when weight loss is the No. 1 goal, diet beats out exercise, according to a study published in October 2014 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. After all, losing weight comes down to caloric deficit, and most p Continue reading >>

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus or type-2 diabetes, is one of the major non-communicable and fastest growing public health problems in the world, is a condition difficult to treat and expensive to manage. It has been estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from the current value of about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years.[1,2,3] Individuals with type-2 diabetes are at a high risk of developing a range of debilitating complications such as cardiovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, nephropathy, changes to the retina and blindness that can lead to disability and premature death. It also imposes important medical and economic burdens. Genetic susceptibility and environmental influences seem to be the most important factors responsible for the development of this condition. However, a drastic increase of physical inactivity, obesity, and type-2 diabetes has been recently observed. The fact indicates that obesity and physical inactivity may constitute the main reasons for the increasing burden of diabetes in the developed world.[4,5,6,7,8,9,10] Fortunately, because environmental factors are modifiable, disease manifestation from these factors is largely preventable. Diet is one of the major factors now linked to a wide range of diseases including diabetes. The amount and type of food consumed is a fundamental determinant of human health. Diet constitutes a crucial aspect of the overall management of diabetes, which may involve diet alone, diet with oral hypoglycemic drugs, or diet with insulin.[11,12,13,14,15] Diet is individualized depending on age, weight, gender, health condition, and occupation etc. The dietary guidelines as used in this review are sets of advisory statements that give quick dietary advic Continue reading >>

6 Steps To Starting Your Own Diabetes Prevention Program

6 Steps To Starting Your Own Diabetes Prevention Program

6 steps to starting your own diabetes prevention program Yesterday, AMA Wire brought you the story of a health care team in suburban Detroit that, seeking ways to provide more timely care to patients with prediabetes, launched its own diabetes prevention program (DPP). Members of the team share their advice for setting up your own DPP, including how to budget for, and staff, this new activity, as well as what to look for in your first group of participants. Western Wayne Physicians is an independent family medicine practice with three sites in suburban Detroit. Its patient population is largely drawn from the regions blue-collar workforce, including many autoworkers and their families. Many of these patients have prediabetes. Robert Jackson, MD, a family physician at Western Wayne, had looked for DPPs in his area but was unable to locate one, so he sought out a lifestyle training program approved by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as part of its National DPP . After selecting three staff members for training, the practice launched its DPP nine weeks ago, and the 13 participants are already losing significant weight. Dr. Jackson and Kayla Jones, office receptionist and lifestyle coach for the group, have the following advice for other primary care practices looking turn the tide of type 2 diabetes by implementing their own prevention programs. Find room in your budget. While Medicare coverage of CDC-recognized DPPs will begin Jan. 1, 2018, many of the nations 86 million people with prediabetes are under 65, and coverage of the benefit outside of Medicare is spotty. You have to be able to pay your staffKayla isnt doing this for free, and we had to backfill her position, Dr. Jackson said. Youll need to make a commitment to doing something that may not Continue reading >>

How Much Walking Is Best For Diabetes Control?

How Much Walking Is Best For Diabetes Control?

How Much Walking Is Best for Diabetes Control? Exercise and walking are excellent tools for controlling Type 2 diabetes and improving health for people with diabetes. Brisk walking workouts can help you maintain a steady blood sugar level and body weight if you have Type 2 diabetes. A 30-minute walk at least five days per week is recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association. Learn how you can enjoy walking and manage your diabetes. Consult your health care team to see if walking is the right exercise for you and any precautions necessary for your individual circumstances and adjustments to your medications or diet. Walking Goal: To walk for 30 minutes, with at least 20 continuous minutes at a brisk pace of 15 to 20 minutes per mile (3 to 4 mph). Walking shoes and socks: You need to protect your feet and prevent developing blisters or sores. Get fitted for flat and flexible athletic shoes at the best running shoe store in your area. Avoid cotton socks and tube socks and choose athletic socks or diabetic socks made of sweat-wicking polyester fiber. Walking clothing: You need good freedom of movement and you need to prevent chafing, which can lead to sores. Wear a fitness T-shirt and fitness shorts, warmup pants or yoga pants. Sweat-wicking polyester fabric is preferred over cotton. Where to walk: You can use a treadmill for your walking workout. If you prefer to walk outside, you should look for a walking route where you can walk withfew interruptions to cross streets. Using a track at a nearby school is an option, or look for a greenway path or a park with a walking loop. Do a foot check: Check your feet before and after each walk. You may not feel blisters and hot spots, which could develop into ulcers if not treated. Get Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Things To Know - Cnn

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Things To Know - Cnn

Health.com: 17 worst habits for your heart "The question we were trying to raise is whether there are added benefits to each individual lifestyle improvement you make, and it looks like that answer is definitely yes," says Jared Reis, Ph.D., the lead author of the study and an epidemiologist with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. "The strength of the association was really very dramatic and quite surprising." Reis and his colleagues analyzed data from more than 200,000 men and women in eight states who are part of a long-running study on diet and health led by the National Cancer Institute. In the mid-1990s, when they ranged in age from 50 to 71 and showed no signs of serious illness, the study participants answered detailed questionnaires about their diet, lifestyle, medical history, physical characteristics and demographic profile. Health.com: Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes Ten years later, roughly 9% of the men and women had developed diabetes. Those who were least likely to receive a diabetes diagnosis shared five key health attributes: Normal weight. They were not overweight or obese, and maintained a body mass index below 25 (a threshold equivalent to 155 pounds for a 5-foot, 6-inch woman). Nonsmoking. They had never been regular smokers, or they'd been smoke-free for at least 10 years. Physically active. They got at least 20 minutes of heart-pounding, sweat-inducing exercise three or more times per week. Healthy diet. They consumed a diet with lots of fiber, little trans fat, few refined or sugary carbohydrates, and a high ratio of good (polyunsaturated) to bad (saturated) fats. Little to no drinking. They used alcohol in moderation, if at all -- two drinks or less a day for men, and one drink or less for women. Each add Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

You may be able to prevent type 2 diabetes. Even if you have several of the risk factors and even if you’ve been told you have pre-diabetes, you can take action and reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Don’t delay: if you’ve been told that you’re at risk of developing diabetes, get started as soon as possible. Your healthcare provider can help you develop a plan, but it should include: Getting to—and staying at—a healthy weight: Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, so if you’re overweight, you should take steps to lose weight. By losing 5% to 10% of your body weight, you can reduce your risk. You can do this by eating smaller portions and being more physically active, which, conveniently enough, are two other ways to prevent type 2 diabetes. Reduce portions and eat healthier: You should choose healthier food choices by reducing portions and limiting added fat and sugar. Choose more whole grains, vegetables, and lean meats and dairy products. Seek out new, healthy recipes; there are many cookbooks that offer lower-fat and healthier recipes. A terrific rule to follow is: everything in moderation. Reduce portion sizes overall. Limit your intake of alcohol; you don’t have to entirely avoid it. Eat small, well-balanced meals spread throughout the day; larger meals can make it more difficult to keep your blood glucose level in a healthy range. Exercising: Exercise is important to help prevent type 2 diabetes because it has so many benefits. It can help you lose weight, and if you’re insulin resistant, it can help your body increase its sensitivity to insulin (exercise can help you use insulin better). Plus, exercise keeps your heart strong, makes you sleep better, and can even put you in a better mood. Continue reading >>

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does Science has given you permission to ramp down your workout Take a breather during your next workout: Walking might protect against diabetes more than running does, research from Duke University suggests. In the study, researchers had people with prediabetes a common condition where your blood sugar is elevated, but not quite at the level to count as diabeteswalk briskly or jog 13.8 miles a week for 6 months. They discovered that those in the walking group showed nearly 6 times greater improvement in their glucose tolerancewhich measures how well their cells absorb blood sugarthan the joggers did. More research needs to be done to figure out why exactly walking seems more protective against diabetes than running, says study coauthor Cris A. Slentz, Ph.D. of Duke University. One possibility? When you perform moderate exerciselike walking three milesyour body taps into its stores of fatty acids to fuel it more than it does when you exercise vigorously, like if you jogged the same distance, he says. Thats good news for your diabetes risk: Too much fatty acids can make it harder for your body to process the hormone insulin. And if your body cant use insulin effectively, your cells wont be able to absorb blood sugar from your bloodstream. So your body cranks out more and more insulin to try to compensate. Eventually, you cant produce enough of it to effectively remove the blood sugar from your blood, which triggers prediabetes and diabetes. Related: How Walking Boosts Your Mood At Work Until further research is performed, its not quite clear whether walking affects the bodies of healthy guys in the same way it does for those who are prediabetic. Still, the findings apply to more guys than you may think: More than 1 out Continue reading >>

12 Ways To Avoid Diabetes - Abc News

12 Ways To Avoid Diabetes - Abc News

Paula Deen Confirms She Has Type 2 Diabetes Paula Deen Confirms She Has Type 2 Diabetes Nearly 25 percent of Americans are thought to have prediabetes -- a condition of slightly elevated blood sugar levels that often develops into diabetes within 10 years -- but only 4 percent of people know it. What's worse, of those who are aware, less than half really tried to reduce their risk by losing weight, eating less, and exercising more. These are just a few of the good-for-you habits that can reverse prediabetes and ensure you never get the real thing, which can mean a lifetime of drugs and blood sugar monitoring, an increased risk of heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other scary health threats. Read on for 12 simple tricks everyone can start today. Shedding even 10 pounds can significantly slash your risk. Even extremely overweight people were 70 percent less likely to develop diabetes when they lost just 5 percent of their weight -- even if they didn't exercise. If you weigh 175 pounds, that's a little less than 9 pounds! Use our calorie calculator to see how many calories you consume -- and how many you need to shave off your diet -- if you want to lose a little. Eating greens with a vinaigrette before a starchy entre may help control your blood sugar levels. In an Arizona State University study, people with type 2 diabetes or a precursor condition called insulin resistance had lower blood sugar levels if they consumed about 2 tablespoons of vinegar just before a high-carb meal. "Vinegar contains acetic acid, which may inactivate certain starch-digesting enzymes, slowing carbohydrate digestion," said lead researcher Carol Johnston. In fact, vinegar's effects may be similar to those of the blood sugar -- lowering medication acarbose (Precose). Before you eat that fe Continue reading >>

This One Thing Is The Highest Risk For Diabetes

This One Thing Is The Highest Risk For Diabetes

Regular exercise plays an important role in the daily maintenance of your blood sugar levels Reducing your daily activity and not exercising, even just for a few days, causes changes in your body that are associated with diabetes Exercise directly impacts your risk of developing diabetes, with regular exercise acting as a strong preventive mechanism When using exercise therapeutically for diabetes, high-intensity, burst-type exercises such as Peak Fitness are key By Dr. Mercola The latest research out of the University of Missouri should be required reading for the 79 million Americans with pre-diabetes and the 26 million with the full-blown disease. Taken together, this amounts to one in four Americans struggling with diabetes and the vast majority of these cases are type 2. When diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, many believe their fate has been sealed and all they can do now is "control" it. More than 50 percent of type 2 diabetics are also not even aware they have diabetes, while millions of others are living in a state of insulin resistance (pre-diabetes) that could progress into diabetes at any time. If someone told you there was a "magic" trick you could do that would almost instantly improve the way your body regulates blood sugar, and also reduce the spikes in blood sugar that occur after a meal (elevations in these spikes, known as postprandial glucose, or PPG, are associated with type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and death), would you do it? Well there is. It's called exercise. And now that you know what it is, the next step is up to you ... Want to Prevent or Reverse Diabetes? Exercise! The amazing thing about exercise is that it exerts its effects very quickly. Sure, you will definitely reap long-term benefits, and exercise is well known to impact chronic diseas Continue reading >>

Rev Run And Justine Simmons Share Their Diabetes Prevention Tips

Rev Run And Justine Simmons Share Their Diabetes Prevention Tips

Rev Run and Justine Simmons Share Their Diabetes Prevention Tips African-Americans are 1.7 times more likely to develop diabetes than non-Hispanic whites. Rev Run is on a mission to make sure people know their risk and get screened. The Run-D.M.C. rapper and his wife, Justine Simmons, have developed the mentality of "health is wealth" to help reduce their risk of diabetes. Joseph Simmons, better known as Rev Run of the hip-hop group Run-D.M.C., doesnt have diabetes. But he and his wife, Justine Simmons, get checked at least once a year. Thats a smart move, because both sides of their family have a history of the disease, and almost 15 percent of African-Americans over age 20 have been diagnosed, according to the American Diabetes Association . Not only that, but African-Americans with diabetes have a greater risk of developing complications such as blindness, amputation, and kidney disease. The looming threat of diabetes hits close to home in the Simmons household. Justine lost her father to diabetes complications, and Revs dad has been diagnosed as well. The couple doesnt want the same fate for themselves or their kids. So Rev and Justine have teamed up with Novo Nordisk for its Ask.Screen.Know campaign, which encourages people to learn if theyre at risk of developing diabetes and learn how to get screened. I've become this voice asking everyone, Did you get screened? and everybody kind of pushes me off and says, I know what Im doing here, Rev says. But your doctor might not always screen you for diabetes at your yearly physical, so youve got to ask him or her to tack it on, Rev says. When Revs friends and family finally get screened after years of simply thinking they were, he considers his work has paid off. I like to be the guy to keep you aware, Rev says. The fami Continue reading >>

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