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Routine Diabetes Tests

Smart Diabetes Management Includes Routine Hearing Tests

Smart Diabetes Management Includes Routine Hearing Tests

Why is it so important to get routine hearing tests if I have diabetes? Research shows that people with diabetes are about twice as likely to develop hearing loss. Yet hearing tests are frequently overlooked in routine diabetes care. In fact, some experts believe that hearing loss may be an under-recognized complication of diabetes. A meta-analysis of 13 different studies found that younger people with diabetes were at an even greater risk of hearing loss. Those with diabetes who were older than 60 were 1.58 times more likely to have hearing loss. But the risk jumped to 2.61 times higher for those 60 and younger. Another study, by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital, found that women between the ages of 60 and 75 with well-controlled diabetes had better hearing than women whose diabetes was poorly controlled, shedding light on the importance of keeping diabetes under control to maintain healthy hearing. Still another study, of patients from a large primary care clinic in the United Kingdom, found that hearing loss is prevalent among people with diabetes and has a strong association with peripheral neuropathy. The hearing loss group in that study had almost twice the rate of at-risk feet. BHI strongly encourages people with diabetes to include regular hearing tests as part of their routine diabetes care. Unrecognized and/or unaddressed hearing loss can interfere with good diabetes management by posing a barrier to good communications between people with diabetes and their doctors. What’s more, untreated hearing loss is often associated with other significant physical, mental, and emotional health conditions. To help you take the first step, BHI has a free, quick, and confidential online hearing check. Anyone can take the confidential online survey to determine if they n Continue reading >>

8 Regular And Important Lab Checks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

8 Regular And Important Lab Checks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

8 regular and important lab checks for people with type 2 diabetes / 8 regular and important lab checks for people with type 2 diabetes Do you know your health numbers? Diabetes isnt only about blood sugar! It is recommended that people with diabetes have regular check ups and labs completed. It can be challenging to keep it all straight, so we explain each important test below. And what's all the fuss about? So that you feel as fit and healthy in the next few years as you do today. And if something comes up in an exam, you can take action immediately. We are not machines. There are no spare parts stored for us, so we must take special care of our bodies. So make appointments, get a check-up and your monster and you can sleep peacefully. Some regular check ups, such as measuring your blood sugar or weight, you can do yourself, others require you to see a doctor: 1. HbA1c check - average blood sugar over time The HbA1c is our average blood sugar over the past 8-12 weeks. The "HB" in HbA1c stands for hemoglobin, which is in our red blood cells and attracts sugar molecules in the blood. The HbA1c measures how many of these sugar molecules are stuck to the hemoglobin. A1c is the average over the past 8-12 weeks because that is how long the average blood cells lives in our body. Its measured in the lab, at your doctors office, or you can even buy a kit from the pharmacy to measure at home. Its expressed as a percentage value (e.x. 7%). Remember, A1c is an average measurement. It cannot tell us whether our glucose was steady at this level overall, or if there we had a lot of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. The higher our blood sugar levels are and the longer they remain elevated, the higher the HbA1c is.Studies show that keeping your A1c close to target can help prevent the Continue reading >>

8 Important Diabetes Tests To Get Regularly

8 Important Diabetes Tests To Get Regularly

Type 2 diabetes can affect every part of your body, from your eyes to your feet. A critical part of managing diabetes is getting routine tests and checkups that can spot problems early to help prevent complications. “Too often, if someone isn’t seeing the same doctor routinely, these important tests can get overlooked,” says Diana Aby-Daniel, PA-C, a physician assistant at the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. “Many diabetes complications are preventable if they’re found early with one of these routine tests.” The following eight diabetes exams and tests will help you get the health care you need: 1. A1C test. This key blood test measures your average blood sugar levels over the previous two or three months, which lets your doctor know how well your blood sugar is being controlled. You should get this test twice a year, if not more often, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). “Try to get your A1C results below or as close to 7 percent as possible,” says George L. King, MD, director of research and head of the section on vascular cell biology at Joslin Diabetes Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. Talk to your doctor about the A1C goal that’s right for you. You can get this test through your primary care doctor. 2. Blood pressure checks. Diabetes makes you more likely to have high blood pressure, which can put you at increased risk for stroke and heart attack. Have your blood pressure checked every time you see your primary care doctor, Dr. King says. 3. Cholesterol test. Because having diabetes increases your risk of heart disease, it’s important to have a blood test to check your cholesterol as part of your annual exam or more frequently if your Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood sugar testing is an important part of diabetes care. Find out when to test your blood sugar level, how to use a testing meter, and more. If you have diabetes, self-testing your blood sugar (blood glucose) can be an important tool in managing your treatment plan and preventing long-term complications of diabetes. You can test your blood sugar at home with a portable electronic device (glucose meter) that measures sugar level in a small drop of your blood. Why test your blood sugar Blood sugar testing — or self-monitoring blood glucose — provides useful information for diabetes management. It can help you: Judge how well you're reaching overall treatment goals Understand how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels Understand how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels Monitor the effect of diabetes medications on blood sugar levels Identify blood sugar levels that are high or low When to test your blood sugar Your doctor will advise you on how often you should check your blood sugar level. In general, the frequency of testing depends on the type of diabetes you have and your treatment plan. Type 1 diabetes. Your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing four to eight times a day if you have type 1 diabetes. You may need to test before meals and snacks, before and after exercise, before bed, and occasionally during the night. You may also need to check your blood sugar level more often if you are ill, change your daily routine or begin a new medication. Type 2 diabetes. If you take insulin to manage type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing two or more times a day, depending on the type and amount of insulin you need. Testing is usually recommended before meals, and sometimes before bedtime. If you manage type 2 Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis And Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis And Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis and Monitoring of Diabetes Symptoms, Diagnosis and Monitoring of Diabetes About 8 million American adults have Type 2 diabetes and many dont know it. And Type 1 diabetes often remains undiagnosed until symptoms become so severe that hospitalization is required. Both of these facts speak to a larger truth: Left untreated, diabetes can cause numerous health complications . Thats why its crucial to know the warning signs and to see a healthcare provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Similarly, those with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes may have no symptoms or such mild symptoms that they go unnoticed for quite some time. Still, since some people experience warning signs, its worth familiarizing yourself with the symptoms below: If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: Overweight , younger than 45 and have one or more additional risk factors, such as: African-American, Asian-American, Latino/Hispanic-American, Native American or of Pacific Islander descent A history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or delivering a baby more than 9 pounds If your blood glucose levels are normal, you should be tested about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after that diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes Three types of tests can help healthcare providers make a diagnosis of prediabetes and diabetes: HbA1C (A1C or glycosylated hemoglobin test) The A1C test can diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. It measures your average bl Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 10 Tests And Exams To Keep You Healthy

Diabetes: 10 Tests And Exams To Keep You Healthy

If you have diabetes, taking care of yourself at home and getting regular checkups are key to staying healthy. During office visits, your doctor will do tests to try to find any problems so they can be treated before they become bigger issues. If you find them early enough, most can be managed with diet, exercise, or medication. This blood test tells you and your doctor how your blood sugar has been over the past 2 to 3 months. While you probably test it every day, that only shows what your levels are at that point in time. The result is given as a percentage the higher the percentage, the higher your blood sugar levels have been. The goal is for your A1C level to be less than 7%. The American Diabetes Association recommends you have this test at least twice a year. You should check your blood pressure regularly at home. But your doctor also will check it each time you visit the office. You can have high blood pressure without knowing it. Generally, your first number (systolic) should be less than 120. Your second number (diastolic) should be under 80. If you have high blood pressure and it's not managed well, for instance with lifestyle changes or medication, you're more likely to have heart disease or a stroke. These types of fat can collect in your arteries and lead to heart problems and stroke. Your doctor will want to check three things with a blood test at least once a year: HDL ("good") cholesterol, LDL ("bad") cholesterol, and triglycerides. You'll want your LDL level to be less than 100 and your triglyceride level to be under 150. On the flip side, a man's HDL should be higher than 40, and a woman's should be over 50. High blood sugar levels can lead to higher levels of cholesterol. Talk with your doctor about where your numbers are and where they should be. T Continue reading >>

Signs, Symptoms And Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Signs, Symptoms And Diagnosis Of Diabetes

The signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes usually develop quickly, especially in children, over a period of weeks. In babies and young children, the first indication of Type 1 diabetes may be a yeast infection that causes a severe diaper rash that's far worse than the common red, puffy and tender skin rash. In young children and infants, lethargy, dehydration and abdominal pain also may indicate Type 1 diabetes. Once the symptoms appear, a blood test generally will reveal very high blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes can be detected easily during a routine screening exam and blood test. However, it frequently can go undiagnosed for years unless a physician draws a blood sample to check the blood glucose. In the early stages of Type 2 diabetes, you experience few to no noticeable signs of the disease. As time goes by and the untreated blood glucose continues to rise, symptoms begin. If you're over 40 or have parents or siblings with diabetes, be sure to have your blood glucose checked routinely. The most common symptoms of undiagnosed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are: Extreme thirst and a greater need to urinate: As excess glucose (sugar) builds up in the bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. The loss of fluid makes you thirsty. As a result, you may drink and urinate more than usual. Frequent hunger: Without enough insulin to move sugar into the cells (Type 1) or insulin resistance prohibiting insulin from entering the cells (Type 2), the muscles and organs are low on energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss: Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, rapid weight loss sometimes occurs. Without the energy that glucose supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often one of the first symptoms to be noticed. Blurred Continue reading >>

Routine Tests | Diabetes Program | Dartmouth-hitchcock

Routine Tests | Diabetes Program | Dartmouth-hitchcock

Uncontrolled diabetes can damage the small blood vessels and nerves of the body, including those in the brain, eyes, heart, kidneys, and feet. This is why routine tests and checkups are especially important. Diabetes is the leading cause of adult blindness in the United States. People with diabetes should see their eye doctor every year to check for any signs of retinopathy, or injury to the retina (the back of the eye). Many people with diabetes suffer from neuropathy, or injury to the nerves, which typically begins with slight numbness in the feet. This loss of sensation means that many people with diabetes do not feel small foot injuries, and risk frequent infections. Because diabetes is the leading cause of non-traumatic foot amputations in the United States, people with diabetes should have their feet examined by their family doctor at each visit. Diabetes is the leading cause of permanent kidney failure in the United States. This leads to dialysis, a process in which a person requires a machine to filter their blood several times per week. To prevent kidney damage (nephropathy), all people with diabetes should have a yearly microalbumin urine test to check for early signs of diabetic injury to the kidneys. Controlling your cholesterol levels can help reduce your risk for heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. All people with diabetes should have a cholesterol test at least once a year. The LDL (low-density lipoprotein, or "bad" cholesterol) reading should be less than 100 for an average diabetic, but it may need to be even less if you have a history of heart disease. The hemoglobin A1c, or glycohemoglobin, test measures your average blood sugar for the previous three months. The goal number for this test is less than 7%. Patients with a level con Continue reading >>

Schedule For Diabetes Lab Tests And Exams

Schedule For Diabetes Lab Tests And Exams

In addition to your daily self-care, it's important to stay up to date with lab tests and physical exams. Keeping regular appointments with your doctor and getting tests on time will: Give you and your doctor important information about how well your diabetes care plan is working. Give you a chance to ask questions and share ideas or concerns you have about your care plan. Help your doctor find and treat any problems before they get worse. The following schedules give a general idea of how often to get exams and lab tests. Depending on your care plan, your schedule might be different. Talk to your doctor about the schedule that's right for you. Physical Exams How Often? Retinal eye exam Eye exam to look for signs of retinopathy (nerve damage to the eye). This exam is done by taking a picture of your eye with a special camera, without having to dilate the eye. Every 2 years if you have type 2 diabetes and don't have signs of retinopathy or have had type 1 diabetes more than 5 years. Every year if you have retinopathy. Foot exam Checks for foot problems so they can be treated early. Includes calluses, bunions, sores, and little or no feeling in your feet. Treating these problems early can keep them from leading to anything more serious. Every year if you have type 2 diabetes or have had type 1 diabetes more than 5 years. More often if you have any foot problems. Weight and blood pressure At every clinic visit. Lab Tests How Often? A1c (Glycosylated hemoglobin) Blood test to measure the amount of glucose attached to your red blood cells. It shows what your average blood sugar level has been for the past 2 to 3 months. As often as every 3 months. Urine check for microalbumin Urine test to look for small proteins (microalbumin), which can show early signs of kidney damage. I Continue reading >>

Laboratory Testing For Diabetes Diagnosis And Management

Laboratory Testing For Diabetes Diagnosis And Management

Laboratory Testing for Diabetes Diagnosis and Management This Test Guide discusses the use of laboratory tests ( Table 1 ) for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and monitoring glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Tools for diagnosing diabetes mellitus include fasting plasma glucose (FPG) measurement, oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT), and standardized hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) assays ( Table 2 ). FPG and OGTT tests are sensitive but measure glucose levels only in the short term, require fasting or glucose loading, and give variable results during stress and illness. 1 In contrast, HbA1c assays reliably estimate average glucose levels over a longer term (2 to 3 months), do not require fasting or glucose loading, and have less variability during stress and illness. 1, 2 In addition, HbA1c assays are more specific for identifying individuals at increased risk for diabetes. 1 Clinically significant glucose and HbA1c levels are shown in Table 2 . 1 The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends using these values for diagnosing diabetes and increased diabetes risk (prediabetes). Following a diagnosis of diabetes, a combination of laboratory and clinical tests can be used to monitor blood glucose control, detect onset and progression of diabetic complications, and predict treatment response. Table 3 shows the recommended testing frequency and target results for these tests. Different laboratory tests are available for monitoring blood glucose control over the short, long, and intermediate term to help evaluate the effectiveness of a management plan. 1 Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is useful for tracking short-term treatment responses in insulin-treated patients, but its usefulness is less clear in noninsulin-treated patients. 1 By contrast, the long-term Hb Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test

Blood Sugar Test

What is a blood sugar test? A blood sugar test is a procedure that measures the amount of sugar, or glucose, in your blood. Your doctor may order this test to help diagnose diabetes. And people with diabetes can use this test to manage their condition. Blood sugar tests provide instant results and let you know the following: your diet or exercise routine needs to change your diabetes medications or treatment is working your blood sugar levels are high or low your overall treatment goals for diabetes are manageable Your doctor may also order a blood sugar test as part of a routine checkup. Or to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes, a condition where your blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Your risk for diabetes increases if any of the following factors are true: you are 45 years old or older you are overweight you don’t exercise much you have high blood pressure, high triglycerides, or low good cholesterol levels (HDL) you have a history of gestational diabetes or giving birth to a baby who weighed over 9 pounds you have a history if insulin resistance you are Asian, African, Hispanic, Pacific Islander, or Native American you have a family history of diabetes Checking your blood sugar levels can be done at home or at a doctor’s office. Read on to learn more about blood sugar tests, who they are for, and what the results mean. Your doctor may order a blood sugar test to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes. The test will measure the amount of glucose in your blood. Your body takes carbohydrates found in foods like grains and fruits and converts them into glucose. Glucose, a sugar, is one of the body’s main sources of energy. For people with diabetes, a home test helps monitor blood sugar levels. Taking a blood sugar test can help determine your blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Tests And Checkups

Diabetes - Tests And Checkups

An eye doctor should check your eyes every year. See an eye doctor who takes care of people with diabetes. If you have eye problems because of diabetes , you will probably see your eye doctor more often. Your doctor should check the pulses in your feet and your reflexes at least once a year. Your doctor should also look for: Loss of feeling anywhere in your feet ( peripheral neuropathy ) If you have had foot ulcers before, see your doctor every 3 to 6 months. It is always a good idea to ask your doctor to check your feet . An A1C lab test shows how well you are controlling your blood sugar levels over a 3-month period. The normal level is less than 5.7%. Most people with diabetes should aim for an A1C of less than 7%. Some people have a higher target. Your doctor will help decide what your target should be. Higher A1C numbers mean that your blood sugar is higher and that you may be more likely to have complications from your diabetes. A cholesterol profile test measures cholesterol and triglycerides in your blood. You should have this kind of test in the morning, after not eating since the night before. Adults with type 2 diabetes should have this test every 5 years. People with high cholesterol or are on medicines to control their cholesterol may have this test more often. Blood pressure should be measured at every visit. Once a year, you should have a urine test that looks for a protein called albumin. Your doctor will also have you take a blood test every year that measures how well your kidneys work. Continue reading >>

5 Important Tests For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Important Tests For Type 2 Diabetes

It takes more than just one abnormal blood test to diagnose diabetes. It takes more than just one abnormal blood test to diagnose diabetes.Istockphoto For centuries, diabetes testing mostly consisted of a physician dipping his pinkie into a urine sample and tasting it to pick up on abnormally high sugar. Thankfully, testing for type 2 diabetes is lot easier nowat least for doctors. Urine tests can still pick up diabetes. However, sugar levels need to be quite high (and diabetes more advanced) to be detected on a urine test, so this is not the test of choice for type 2 diabetes. Almost all diabetes tests are now conducted on blood samples, which are collected in a visit to your physician or obstetrician (if you're pregnant). If you have an abnormal resultmeaning blood sugar is too highon any of these tests, you'll need to have more testing. Many things can affect blood sugar (such as certain medications, illness, or stress). A diabetes diagnosis requires more than just one abnormal blood sugar result. The main types of diabetes blood tests include: Oral glucose-tolerance test . This test is most commonly performed during pregnancy. You typically have your blood drawn once, then drink a syrupy glucose solution and have your blood drawn at 30 to 60 minute intervals for up to three hours to see how your body is handling the glut of sugar. Normal result: Depends on how many grams of glucose are in the solution, which can vary. Fasting blood sugar. This is a common test because it's easy to perform. After fasting overnight, you have your blood drawn at an early morning doctor's visit and tested to see if your blood sugar is in the normal range. Normal result: 70-99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) or less than 5.5 mmol/L Two-hour postprandial test. This blood test is done tw Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often appear suddenly and are often the reason for checking blood sugar levels. Because symptoms of other types of diabetes and prediabetes come on more gradually or may not be evident, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended screening guidelines. The ADA recommends that the following people be screened for diabetes: Anyone with a body mass index higher than 25, regardless of age, who has additional risk factors, such as high blood pressure, a sedentary lifestyle, a history of polycystic ovary syndrome, having delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds, a history of diabetes in pregnancy, high cholesterol levels, a history of heart disease, and having a close relative with diabetes. Anyone older than age 45 is advised to receive an initial blood sugar screening, and then, if the results are normal, to be screened every three years thereafter. Tests for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and prediabetes Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. If the A1C test results aren't consistent, the test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Tests And Checkups

Diabetes - Tests And Checkups

See your diabetes doctor for an exam every 3 to 6 months. During this exam, your doctor should check your: Blood pressure Weight Feet See your dentist every 6 months, also. Your doctor should check the pulses in your feet and your reflexes at least once a year. Your doctor should also look for: If you have had foot ulcers before, see your doctor every 3 to 6 months. It is always a good idea to ask your doctor to check your feet. An A1c lab test shows how well you are controlling your blood sugar levels over a 3-month period. The normal level is less than 5.7%. Most people with diabetes should aim for an A1C of less than 7%. Some people have a higher target. Your doctor will help decide what your target should be. Higher A1C numbers mean that your blood sugar is higher and that you may be more likely to have complications from your diabetes. Continue reading >>

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