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Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose Care Plan Newborn

Nursing Diagnosis And 11 Gordons Functional Health Patterns

Nursing Diagnosis And 11 Gordons Functional Health Patterns

Nursing Diagnosis and 11 Gordons Functional Health Patterns Sumber dari : Gordons Functional Health Patterns is a method develops By Marjorie Gordon in 1987 proposed functional health patterns as a guide for establishing a comprehensive nursing data base. By using these categories its possible to create a systematic and standardized approach to data collection, and enable the nurse to determine the following aspects of health and human function: Health Perception Health Management Pattern Health Perception and Health Management. Its focused on the persons perceived level of health and well-being, and on practices for maintaining health. Also evaluated Habits including smoking and alcohol or drug use. Ineffective community therapeutic regimen management Ineffective family therapeutic regimen management Readiness for enhanced immunization status Readiness for enhanced therapeutic regimen management Risk for perioperative positioning injury Nutritional Metabolic Pattern its focused on the pattern of food and fluid consumption relative to metabolic need. Is evaluated the adequacy of local nutrient supplies. Actual or potential problems related to fluid balance, tissue integrity, and host defenses may be identified as well as problems with the gastrointestinal system. Imbalanced nutrition: more than body requirements Imbalanced nutrition: less than body requirements Imbalanced nutrition: risk for more than body requirements Elimination Pattern. Its focused on excretory patterns (bowel, bladder, skin). Readiness for enhanced urinary elimination, Activity and Exercise Pattern. Its focused on the activities of daily living requiring energy expenditure, including self-care activities, exercise, and leisure activities. Readiness for enhanced organized infant behavior Cognitive-P Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In A Newborn Baby

Hypoglycemia In A Newborn Baby

What is hypoglycemia in a newborn baby? Hypoglycemia is when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood is too low. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the brain and the body. In a newborn baby, low blood sugar can happen for many reasons. It can cause problems such as shakiness, blue tint to the skin, and breathing and feeding problems. What causes hypoglycemia in a newborn baby? Hypoglycemia can be caused by conditions such as: Poor nutrition for the mother during pregnancy Making too much insulin because the mother has poorly controlled diabetes Incompatible blood types of mother and baby (severe hemolytic disease of the newborn) Birth defects Congenital metabolic diseases Not enough oxygen at birth (birth asphyxia) Liver disease Infection Which newborns are at risk for hypoglycemia? Babies are more likely to have hypoglycemia include: Babies born to mothers with diabetes Babies who are small for gestational age or growth-restricted Preterm babies, especially those with low birth weights Babies born under significant stress Babies with mothers treated with certain medicines such as terbutaline Babies who are large for their gestational age What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia in a newborn baby? Signs of low blood sugar may not be obvious in newborn babies. The most common signs include: Shakiness Blue tint to skin and lips (cyanosis) Stopping breathing (apnea) Low body temperature (hypothermia) Floppy muscles (poor muscle tone) Not interested in feeding Lack of movement and energy (lethargy) Seizures The signs of hypoglycemia can be like other health conditions. Make sure your child sees his or her healthcare provider for a diagnosis. How is hypoglycemia in a newborn baby diagnosed? A simple blood test for blood glucose levels can diagnose the problem. How is hypo Continue reading >>

Free Nursing Care Plans Based On Nursing Diagnosis

Free Nursing Care Plans Based On Nursing Diagnosis

Free Nursing Care Plans Based On Nursing Diagnosis Nursing Diagnosis: Feeding Self-care deficit Nursing Diagnosis: Functional urinary Incontinence Nursing Diagnosis: Impaired Oral mucous membrane Nursing Diagnosis: Impaired Physical Mobility Nursing Diagnosis: Impaired Skin integrity Nursing Diagnosis: Ineffective Health maintenance Nursing Diagnosis: Ineffective Therapeutic regimen management Nursing Diagnosis: Ineffective Tissue perfusion (specify type): cerebral, renal, cardiopulmonary, GI, peripheral Nursing Diagnosis: Imbalanced Nutrition: more than body requirements Nursing Diagnosis: Imbalanced Nutrition: less than body requirements Nursing Diagnosis: Risk for situational low Self-esteem Nursing Diagnosis: Total urinary Incontinence Coping: Community, Readiness for Enhanced Coping (Individual), Readiness for Enhanced Immunization Status, Readiness for Enhanced Infant Behavior: Organized, Readiness for Knowledge (Specify), Readiness for Enhanced Neurovascular Dysfunction: Peripheral, Risk for Perioperative Positioning Injury, Risk for Sensory Perception, Disturbed (Specify: Auditory, Gustatory, Kinesthetic, Olfactory Tactile, Spiritual Well-Being, Readiness for Enhanced Therapeutic Regimen Management, Readiness for Tissue Perfusion, Ineffective (Specify: Cerebral, Cardiopulmonary, Gastrointestinal, Renal) Tissue Perfusion, Ineffective, Peripheral Urinary Elimination, Readiness for Enhanced Donating Umbilical Cord Blood: With a little bit of planning, you could change someones life, you could donate your babys umbilical cord blood to a public bank at no cost to you. Umbilical cord blood is rich with blood-forming cells, cells that are no longer needed by your baby after delivery. But these cells may be needed by someone else someone with a life-threatening disease Continue reading >>

Newborn Care Plans | Allnurses

Newborn Care Plans | Allnurses

Ineffective infant feeding pattern R/T gestational diabetis Care plan and interventions for a 5 hour old macrosomic newborn Last edit by pocahontas3 on Mar 5, '14: Reason: add Is there a question you have? We're not just going to create a care plan for you What do you think your care plan & interventions should be? BTW, it's "gestational diabetes". My instructor docks points for spelling . Welcome to AN! The largest online nursing community! We are happy to help but we need to know what you think first. what semester are you? Spelling is a big deal as misspellings can be something else entirely in nursing. Ineffective infant feeding pattern R/T gestational diabetis It's "diabetes," and there is no such related to/causative factor for this nursing diagnosis in NANDA-I 2012-2014. YOu can't say this infant is feeding ineffectively because his mother had GD. Where did you get that idea? You can't just make up a "related to/causative factor" because it sounds good to you. You must use approved material from the NANDA-I 2012-2014. See below. See, you are falling into the classic nursing student trap of trying desperately to find a nursing diagnosis for a medical diagnosis without really looking at your assignment as a nursing assignment. You are not being asked to find an auxiliary medical diagnosis-- nursing diagnoses are not dependent on medical ones. You are not being asked to supplement the medical plan of care-- you are being asked to develop your skills to determine a nursing plan of care. This is complementary but not dependent on the medical diagnosis or plan of care. In all fairness, we see ample evidence every day that nursing faculty sometimes have a hard time communicating this concept to new nursing students. So my friend Esme and I do our best to reboot you and Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In The Newborn

Hypoglycemia In The Newborn

What is hypoglycemia in the newborn? Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the amount of blood glucose (sugar) in the blood is lower than normal (under 50 mg/dL). Who is affected by hypoglycemia in the newborn? Babies who are more likely to develop hypoglycemia include: Babies born to diabetic mothers may develop hypoglycemia after delivery when the source of glucose (via the umbilical cord) is gone and the baby's insulin production metabolizes the existing glucose. Small for gestational age or growth-restricted babies may have too few glycogen stores. Premature babies, especially those with low birthweights, who often have limited glycogen stores (sugar stored in the liver) or an immature liver function. Babies born under significant stress. Babies who experience temperature instability (for instance, get cold) or when mothers were treated with certain drugs (for instance, terbutaline) Infants of diabetic mothers Babies who are large for their gestational age. This is associated with gestational diabetes, but also with forms of congenital hyperinsulinism What causes hypoglycemia in the newborn? Hypoglycemia may be caused by conditions that: Lower the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. Prevent or lessen storage of glucose. Use up glycogen stores (sugar stored in the liver). Inhibit the use of glucose by the body. Many different conditions may be associated with hypoglycemia in the newborn, including the following: Inadequate maternal nutrition in pregnancy Excess insulin produced in a baby of a diabetic mother Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn (incompatibility of blood types of mother and baby) Birth defects and congenital metabolic diseases Birth asphyxia Cold stress (conditions that are too cold) Liver disease Infection Why is hypoglycemia in the newborn a con Continue reading >>

Nanda Nursing Interventions

Nanda Nursing Interventions

Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a disease caused by defective carbohydrate metabolism and characterized by abnormally large amounts of sugar in the blood and urine. Diabetes mellitus is usually classified into two types. Type I or "insulin-dependent" diabetes mellitus (IDDM), formerly called juvenile-onset diabetes, which occurs in children and young adults has been implicated as one of the autoimmune diseases. Type II or "non-insulin-dependent" diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), formerly called adult-onset diabetes is found in persons over 40 years old and progresses slowly. Diabetes Mellitus that is characterized by hyperglycemia or dangerously high blood sugar levels can be caused either by not enough secretion of insulin which is generally caused by defects in the pancreas or the development of insulin resistance by cells that lead to the lack of capacity to properly utilize insulin. Nursing diagnosis is the individual response to actual and potential problems, which meant the actual problem is a problem that was found at the time of assessment, while a potential problem is likely to arise later. Nursing Diagnosis that may appear on the client with Diabetes Mellitus by Carpenitto, Doengoes, Sorensen and Brunner and Suddart include: 1) Imbalanced Nutrition Less Than Body Requirements related to reduction of carbohydrate metabolism due to insulin deficiency, inadequate intake due to nausea and vomiting. 2) Fluid Volume Deficit related to osmotic diuresis from hyperglycemia, polyuria, decreased fluid intake. 3) Impaired Skin Integrity related to decreased sensory sensation, impaired circulation, decreased activity / mobilization, lack of knowledge of skin care. 4) Activity Intolerance related to weakness due to decreased energy production. 5) High risk of injury associated with dec Continue reading >>

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes (and Diagnosis), High Blood Sugar, Hyperglycemia, Dka, Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Fluid Electrolytes Imbalance

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes (and Diagnosis), High Blood Sugar, Hyperglycemia, Dka, Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Fluid Electrolytes Imbalance

Looking for a nursing care plan for diabetes? This nursing care plan and interventions are for thefollowing conditions: Diabetes, High Blood Sugar, Hyperglycemia, DKA, Diabetic Ketoacidosis, and Fluid and Electrolytes Imbalance. What are nursing care plans? How do you develop a nursing care plan? What nursing care plan book do you recommend helping you develop a nursing care plan? This care plan is listed to give an example of how a Nurse (LPN or RN) may plan to treat a patient with those conditions. Important Disclosure: Please keep in mind that these care plans are listed for Example/Educational purposes only, and some of these treatments may change over time. Do not treat a patient based on this care plan. Care Plans are often developed in different formats. The formatting isn’t always important, and care plan formatting may vary among different nursing schools or medical jobs. Some hospitals may have the information displayed in digital format, or use pre-made templates. The most important part of the care plan is the content, as that is the foundation on which you will base your care. Nursing Care Plan for: Diabetes, High Blood Sugar, Hyperglycemia, DKA, Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Fluid and Electrolytes Imbalance. If you want to view a video tutorial on how to construct a care plan in nursing school, please view the video below. Otherwise, scroll down to view this completed care plan. Scenario: A 38 year old male presents to the ER. He states he has been having blurry vision, extreme thirst, and frequent urination since last Sunday night after he attended a Super Bowl Party. It is now Tuesday. He stated that since yesterday morning he has been vomiting. Pt states he has been a type 1 diabetic since he was 5 years old. He states he finds being a diabetic an inconvenie Continue reading >>

Glucose

Glucose

Synonym/Acronym: Blood sugar, fasting blood sugar (FBS), postprandial glucose, 2-hr PC (post cibum). Common Use: To assist in the diagnosis of diabetes and to evaluate disorders of carbohydrate metabolism such as malabsorption syndrome. Specimen: Serum collected in a gold-, red-, or red/gray-top tube, although plasma is recommended for diagnosis of diabetes. Plasma collected in a gray-top (sodium fluoride) or a green-top (heparin) tube. Normal Findings: (Method: Spectrophotometry) Age Conventional Units SI Units (Conventional Units × 0.0555) Fasting Cord blood 45–96 mg/dL 2.5–5.3 mmol/L Premature infant 20–80 mg/dL 1.1–4.4 mmol/L Newborn 2 d–2 yr 30–100 mg/dL 1.7–5.6 mmol/L Child 60–100 mg/dL 3.3–5.6 mmol/L Adult-older adult Less than 100 mg/dL Less than 5.6 mmol/L Prediabetes or impaired fasting glucose 100–125 mg/dL 5.6–6.9 mmol/L 2-hr postprandial 65–139 mg/dL 3.6–7.7 mmol/L Prediabetes or impaired 2-hr sample 140–199 mg/dL 7.8–11 mmol/L Random Less than 200 mg/dL Less than 11.1 mmol/L The American Diabetes Association and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases consider a confirmed fasting blood glucose greater than 126 mg/dL to be consistent with a diagnosis of diabetes. Values tend to increase in older adults. Glucose, a simple six-carbon sugar (monosaccharide), enters the diet as part of the sugars sucrose, lactose, and maltose and from the complex polysaccharide, dietary starch. The body acquires most of its energy from the oxidative metabolism of glucose. Excess glucose is stored in the liver or in muscle tissue as glycogen. Glucose levels in plasma (one of the components of blood) are generally 10% to 15% higher than glucose measurements in whole blood (and even more after eating). This is important becau Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Management From Preconception To The Postnatal Period

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Management From Preconception To The Postnatal Period

Next 1 Recommendations The following guidance is based on the best available evidence. The full guideline gives details of the methods and the evidence used to develop the guidance. This guideline refers frequently to circulating glucose concentrations as 'blood glucose'. A lot of the evidence linking specific circulating glucose concentrations with particular outcomes uses 'plasma' rather than 'blood' glucose. In addition, patient‑held glucose meters (which use capillary blood samples) and monitoring systems are all calibrated to plasma glucose equivalents. However, the term 'blood glucose monitoring' is in very common use, so in this guideline we use the term 'blood glucose', except when referring to concentration values. 1.1 Preconception planning and care 1.1.1 Aim to empower women with diabetes to have a positive experience of pregnancy and childbirth by providing information, advice and support that will help to reduce the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes for mother and baby. [2008] 1.1.2 Explain to women with diabetes who are planning to become pregnant that establishing good blood glucose control before conception and continuing this throughout pregnancy will reduce the risk of miscarriage, congenital malformation, stillbirth and neonatal death. It is important to explain that risks can be reduced but not eliminated. [2008] 1.1.3 Give women with diabetes who are planning to become pregnant, and their family members, information about how diabetes affects pregnancy and how pregnancy affects diabetes. The information should cover: the role of diet, body weight and exercise the risks of hypoglycaemia and impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia during pregnancy how nausea and vomiting in pregnancy can affect blood glucose control the increased risk of having a baby Continue reading >>

Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose Level Nursing Diagnosis And Nursing Care Plan

Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose Level Nursing Diagnosis And Nursing Care Plan

Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level Care Plan Want create site? Find Free WordPress Themes and plugins. Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level Nursing Diagnosis and Nursing Care Plan Risk for unstable blood glucose level is the presence of possible variation of blood glucose/sugar levels from the normal range. Glucose is one kind of sugar which the body utilizes most and used it a source of energy. Serum glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to body cells via the bloodstreamand is made available for cell absorption via the hormone insulin which is a hormone produced by the body found in the pancreas. Sometimes due to different causative factors, glucose levels is beyond normal ranges. Hyperglycemia or the elevated blood glucose levels may occur in a variety of clinical situations.In the occurrence of increase blood glucose level at a constant basis, it detects the presence of Diabetes Mellitus which is a disorder that causes inability to normalize the blood glucose levels of the body. There are certain treatments for this DM but there are instances that it can produce hypoglycemia which is the opposite of Diabetes. Patients with DM are at risk of having unstable blood glucose levels. They need to maintain the blood glucose levels at all times. It should not be above or below normal ranges because it will cause certain symptoms. An important part of managing blood glucose levels, as well as the overall health of a person, is maintaining a healthy weight through a healthy diet and exercise plan. Diabetes needs a strict management of the disease process to prevent several complications thereafter. Risk Factorsfor unstable blood glucose level Average daily physical activity is less than recommended for gender and age Insufficient knowledge of disease managem Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Unstable Blood Glucose Level: Integrative Review Of The Risk Factors Related To The Nursing Diagnosis

Risk Factors For Unstable Blood Glucose Level: Integrative Review Of The Risk Factors Related To The Nursing Diagnosis

Risk factors for unstable blood glucose level: integrative review of the risk factors related to the nursing diagnosis We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo Risk factors for unstable blood glucose level: integrative review of the risk factors related to the nursing diagnosis Andressa Magalhes Teixeira, Rosangela Tsukamoto, [...], and Rita de Cassia Gengo e Silva to identify evidence in the literature on the possible risk factors for the risk of unstable blood glucose diagnosis in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to compare them with the risk factors described by NANDA International. an integrative literature review guided by the question: what are the risk factors for unstable blood glucose level in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus? Primary studies were included whose outcomes were variations in glycemic levels, published in English, Portuguese or Spanish, in PubMed or CINAHL between 2010 and 2015. altered levels of glycated hemoglobin, body mass index>31 kg/m2, previous history of hypoglycemia, cognitive deficit/dementia, autonomic cardiovascular neuropathy, comorbidities and weight loss corresponded to risk factors described in NANDA International. Other risk factors identified were: advanced age, black skin color, longer length of diabetes diagnosis, daytime sleepiness, macroalbuminuria, genetic polymorphisms, insulin therapy, use of Continue reading >>

Maternal Nursing Care Plan For Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose

Maternal Nursing Care Plan For Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose

The goal would be successfully met if the client can verbalize 5 self-care actions to take if blood glucose is too high or too low on xxxxxx. If the client can not verbalize 5 self-care actions the goal would not be successfully met. If the client either verbalize having kept a blood glucose diary, or can present a blood glucose diary this intervention would be successful. If not, the intervention would be unsuccessful. The intervention would be successful if the client verbalizes having consumed extra carbs or glucose before exercising. If the client can not do this the intervention is not successful. The intervention would be successful if the client verbalizes continuing insulin therapy. If the client can not do this the intervention is not successful. 4,700 Med Surg Nursing review flash cards, download now and ace your exams About catholic charities USA. (2009). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from Ackley, B. & Ladwig, G. (2008). Nursing diagnosis handbook: An evidence-based guide to planning care. St. A womans choice resource center. (2006). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from Disaster assistance. (2009). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from Disaster assistance available from FEMA. (2009). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from assistance/process/assistance.shtm#1 Get assistance. (2009). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from d8aaecf214c576bf971e4cfe43181aa0/?vgnextoid=6cde1a53f1c37110VgnVCM1000003481a10aRCRD& Necoles place. (2006). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from Prepare for disaster. (2009). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from Prepare your family and home. (2009). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from http:// www.redcross.org/portal/ site/en/menuitem.d8aaecf214c576bf971e4cfe43181aa0/?vgnextoid=72c51a53f1c37110VgnVCM100000 Ricci, S.S. & Kyle, T. (2009). Maternity and pediatric nursing. China: Wolters Continue reading >>

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Diabetes is really prevalent. Just recall all the patients you saw today and theres probably a handful of them who are diabetic. According to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionDivision of Diabetes Translation, up to 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes. Because of how prevalent it is, nurses need to be highly knowledgeable and skilled when it comes to educating and caring for their patients. That includes preparing the right nursing care plan for diabetes. Diabetes ordiabetes mellitusis a metabolic disease where blood glucose levels are abnormally high. Symptoms of high blood glucose levels include: In general, there are three types of diabetes and each one varies in terms of treatment and management. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent and juvenile-onset diabetes. This type of diabetes often begins early in childhood. Its an autoimmune disorder where the bodys immune system attacks its own pancreas, inhibiting its capacity to produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the 95% of diabetes cases in the US. Onset is usually late in adulthood. It happens when the pancreas is unable to produce adequate insulin to meet the bodys needs or when the bodys cells become resistant to it. Type 2 diabetes can be managed with lifestyle and diet changes as well as intake of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). Gestational diabetes is characterized by pregnancy-induced insulin resistance. It affects roughly 2% to 10% of pregnancies. Diabetic patients need complex nursing care. Here are some of the most important NCPs for diabetes: 1. Deficient knowledge regarding disease process, treatment, and individual care needs verbal statements of concerns or misconceptions improper or inadequate follow-through of instructions de Continue reading >>

Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose Level

Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose Level

Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level: Risk for variation of blood glucose/sugar levels from the normal range. There are different kinds of sugars. “Glucose” is what our body utilizes most. Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies and use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. Serum glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to body cells via the bloodstream and is made available for cell absorption via the hormone insulin, produced by the body primarily in the pancreas. Insulin is secreted by the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas in response to elevated level of blood glucose. This pancreatic hormone facilitates the movement of glucose across the cell membranes to be used for metabolic activity. The alpha cells of the islets of Langerhans secrete glucagon when blood glucose levels are low. Download PDF To View PDF, Download Here DocToPDF Hyperglycemia or elevated blood glucose levels may occur in a variety of clinical situations. Diabetes mellitus is the most common disorder associated with elevated blood glucose levels. Certain drugs have hyperglycemia as a side effect. Hypoglycemia, otherwise, occurs most often as the result of excess insulin administration in the person with diabetes mellitus. It may also occur to a person who has excessive alcohol intake, prolonged fasting and starvation states, adrenal insufficiency, and eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa. Low blood glucose levels after meals may be linked to gastric bypass surgery or excess consumption of refined carbohydrates and is the result of increased insulin production. An important part of managing blood glucose levels, as well as the ov Continue reading >>

Nurse's Pocket Guide: Diagnoses Prioritized Interventions And Rationales - F.a.davis Company - Literati By Credo

Nurse's Pocket Guide: Diagnoses Prioritized Interventions And Rationales - F.a.davis Company - Literati By Credo

Nurse's Pocket Guide: Diagnoses Prioritized Interventions and Rationales Nurse's Pocket Guide: Diagnoses Prioritized Interventions and Rationales Editor/Author Doenges, Marilynn E., Moorhouse, Mary Frances and Murr, Alice C. Unlimited-User Purchase Price: Not Available This quick-reference tool has what you need to select the appropriate diagnosis to plan your patients care effectively. The 14th Edition features all the latest nursing diagnoses and updated interventions. A laminated "pocket minder" bookmark makes diagnosis even easier. The Nursing Process and Planning Client Care ACTIVITY INTOLERANCE and risk for ACTIVITY INTOLERANCE ineffective ACTIVITY PLANNING and risk for ineffective ACTIVITY PLANNING AUTONOMIC DYSREFLEXIA and risk for AUTONOMIC DYSREFLEXIA disorganized infant BEHAVIOR and risk for disorganized infant BEHAVIOR readiness for enhanced organized infant BEHAVIOR decreased CARDIAC OUTPUT and risk for decreased CARDIAC OUTPUT risk for impaired CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTION ineffective CHILDBEARING PROCESS and risk for ineffective CHILDBEARING PROCESS readiness for enhanced CHILDBEARING PROCESS acute CONFUSION and risk for acute CONFUSION chronic functional CONSTIPATION and risk for functional CONSTIPATION risk for peripheral neurovascular DYSFUNCTION readiness for enhanced urinary ELIMINATION impaired EMANCIPATED DECISION-MAKING and risk for impaired EMANCIPATED DECISION-MAKING readiness for enhanced EMANCIPATED DECISION-MAKING FRAIL ELDERLY SYNDROME and risk for FRAIL ELDERLY SYNDROME dysfunctional GASTROINTESTINAL MOTILITY and risk for dysfunctional GASTROINTESTINAL MOTILITY risk for ineffective GASTROINTESTINAL PERFUSION urge urinary INCONTINENCE and risk for urge urinary INCONTINENCE neonatal JAUNDICE and risk for neonatal JAUNDICE deficient KNOWLEDGE [Lea Continue reading >>

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