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Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes You’re at risk for developing prediabetes if you: Are overweight Are 45 years or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk) You can prevent or reverse prediabetes with simple, proven lifestyle changes such as losing weight if you’re overweight, eating healthier, and getting regular physical activity. The CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make healthy changes that have lasting results. Type 2 Diabetes You’re at risk for developing type 2 diabetes if you: Have prediabetes Are overweight Are 45 years or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk) You can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes with simple, proven lifestyle changes such as losing weight if you’re overweight, eating healthier, and getting regular physical activity. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an immune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake). Risk factors for type 1 diabetes are not as clear as for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Known risk factors include: Family history: Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 1 diabetes. Age: You can get type 1 diabetes at any age, but Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors

Type 2 diabetes has many risk factors associated with it, mostly related to lifestyle choices. Type 2 diabetes develops when glucose—which our bodies need for energy—stays in the blood and can’t get into the cells. This occurs when the pancreas either doesn’t make enough insulin or the body doesn’t use the insulin as it should, leading to insulin resistance. About Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance means your body cannot use the insulin your body makes. Your body may produce sufficient amounts of insulin to transport glucose to the cells, but the body resists the insulin. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood and causes symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes. Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes But in order to develop insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, you must also have a genetic abnormality. Along the same lines, some people with type 2 don’t produce enough insulin; that is also due to a genetic abnormality. That is, not everyone can develop type 2 diabetes. Additionally, not everyone with a genetic abnormality will develop type 2 diabetes; these risk factors and lifestyle choices influence the development. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include: Family history: Type 2 diabetes has a hereditary factor. If someone in your close family has (or had) it, you are more likely to develop it. Race/ethnicity: Certain ethnic groups are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, including African-Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. It’s interesting to point out that as certain countries have become more Westernized and their lifestyle choices—particularly their food choices—have become more “American,” the incidence of type 2 diabetes has gone up. For instance, China used to have a low rate of type 2 diabe Continue reading >>

Understanding Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a condition that causes dangerously high blood sugar levels. The most common form is Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes results when the body does not make enough insulin or develops insulin resistance. Many people with Type 2 diabetes are not aware they have the disease. Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes that you can’t change include: Family history A blood relative with diabetes significantly increases your risk. Race or ethnic background African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, Native Americans and Pacific Islanders have a greater chance of developing Type 2 diabetes. Age Adults 45 and older are at increased risk of developing the disease. History of gestational diabetes Diabetes during pregnancy also increases the risk of future diabetes. Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes that you can change include: Being overweight/obese Losing 5 to 7 percent of your body weight can cut your risk of developing diabetes in half. Risk of the disease continues to decrease with additional weight loss. Physical inactivity Achieving 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity each week can improve how well your body uses insulin and help you avoid type 2 diabetes. Unhealthy food choices Diets low in fiber and high in fats have been linked to increased risk of diabetes. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables may help to prevent diabetes. Controlling the risk factors that you can change can help prevent Type 2 diabetes and improve your quality of life. — Michael Gardner, MD, endocrinologist at MU Health Care Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk Factors

Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk Factors

About 75 million Americans either have type 2 diabetes or are on their way to developing it. Your risk increases as you get older (over 45 years old), if you are overweight or obese, or if you if you carry most of your weight around your abdomen. Having any of the following factors also puts you at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes: You are African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, Native American or Pacific Islander You have a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes You are generally physically inactive You’ve already been told you have pre-diabetes You had gestational diabetes or a baby who weighed more than nine pounds Your blood pressure is 140/90 or above Your triglyceride level is above 250 mg/dl or your HDL is below 35 mg/dl You are a woman who has Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) The more risk factors you have, the higher your chance of developing type 2 diabetes. If you have any of the above risk factors, ask your health care provider to test you for diabetes. “In many instances type 2 diabetes can be prevented or its progress can be slowed by following various lifestyle interventions. Therefore, it’s very important to get tested if you have any of the risk factors,” advises Jeanne Spellman, RD, Joslin Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Your chances of developing type 2 diabetes depend on a combination of risk factors such as your genes and lifestyle. Although you can’t change risk factors such as family history, age, or ethnicity, you can change lifestyle risk factors around eating, physical activity, and weight. These lifestyle changes can affect your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Read about risk factors for type 2 diabetes below and see which ones apply to you. Taking action on the factors you can change can help you delay or prevent type 2 diabetes. You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older have a family history of diabetes are African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander have high blood pressure have a history of gestational diabetes or gave birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more are not physically active have acanthosis nigricans—dark, thick, and velvety skin around your neck or armpits You can also take the Diabetes Risk Test to learn about your risk for type 2 diabetes. To see if your weight puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes, find your height in the Body Mass Index (BMI) charts below. If your weight is equal to or more than the weight listed, you have a greater chance of developing the disease. If you are not Asian American or Pacific Islander If you are Asian American If you are Pacific Islander At-risk BMI ≥ 25 At-risk BMI ≥ 23 At-risk BMI ≥ 26 Height Weight Height Weight Height Weight 4'10" 119 4'10" 110 4'10" 124 4'11" 124 4'11" 114 4'11" 128 5'0" 128 5'0" 118 5'0" 133 5'1" 132 5'1" 122 5'1" 137 5'2" 136 5'2" 126 5'2" 142 5'3" 141 5'3" 130 5'3" 146 5'4" 145 5'4" 134 5'4" 151 5'5" 150 5'5" 138 5'5" 156 5'6" 155 5'6" 142 5'6" 161 5'7" 159 5'7" 146 5'7" 166 5'8" 1 Continue reading >>

Hypertension Is An Independent Risk Factor For Type 2 Diabetes: The Korean Genome And Epidemiology Study

Hypertension Is An Independent Risk Factor For Type 2 Diabetes: The Korean Genome And Epidemiology Study

Hypertension and diabetes share common risk factors and frequently co-occur. Although high blood pressure (BP) was reported as a significant predictor of type 2 diabetes, little is known about this association in Korea. This study investigated the relationship of prehypertension and hypertension with type 2 diabetes in 7150 middle-aged Koreans, as well as the effect of BP control on diabetes development over 8 years. At 8 years, 1049 (14.7%) of the 7150 participants had newly developed diabetes, including 11.2, 16.7 and 21.5% of baseline normotensive, prehypertensive and hypertensive subjects, respectively. The overall incidence rate of diabetes was 22.3 events per 1000 person-years. Subjects with baseline prehypertension (hazard ratio (HR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09–1.48) and hypertension (HR 1.51; 95% CI, 1.29–1.76) were at higher risk of diabetes than normotensive subjects after controlling for potential confounders (P-value for trend <0.001). These associations persisted even when subjects were stratified by baseline glucose status, sex and body mass index (BMI). The risk of diabetes was significantly higher in subjects who had normal BP at baseline and progressed to prehypertention or hypertension at 8 years (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20–1.83) than those with controlled BP, but these associations were not observed in subjects with baseline prehypertension and hypertension. These findings showed that prehypertension and hypertension are significantly associated with the development of diabetes, independent of baseline glucose status, sex and BMI. Active BP control reduced incident diabetes only in normotensive individuals, suggesting the need for early BP management. The worldwide incidence of diabetes has increased significantly,1 with the number of Continue reading >>

Five Social And Behavioral Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Five Social And Behavioral Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is an epidemic plaguing the nation, and it is considered to be largely preventable. Over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, and one out of four don’t realize they have the chronic disease. What factors are contributing to this rising number, and what can you do to keep from becoming another statistic? Access to care Access to health care is a major issue affecting Americans with chronic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes. Rural regions and low income areas in cities often face barriers to access, such as poor (or nonexistent) public transportation, few or no health care providers in the area and poor health insurance coverage. Even if they are able to see a health care provider, many people are unable to afford the costs of managing diabetes with medications. Community infrastructure The way your community is built can affect your health. Areas that lack sidewalks, bike paths or recreational areas—amenities that encourage physical activity—contribute to obesity, which can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes for residents. Additionally, the location of grocery stores/supermarkets in a community can affect the ability to establish a healthy lifestyle because residents lack access to healthier food choices. Over 23 million Americans live in rural and low-income areas that are more than a mile from a supermarket, which makes them, in common public health parlance, “food deserts.” Initiatives like the Let’s Move campaign are working toward helping these areas make healthy foods available and safe places for physical activity more accessible to their inhabitants. Education The level of education you have could influence your risk of diabetes, with some studies finding that people with more education are less likely to have diabetes. T Continue reading >>

Study Examines Shift Work And Genetic Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Study Examines Shift Work And Genetic Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Study examines shift work and genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes Frequency of shift work and genetics contribute to the likelihood of having type 2 diabetes. A new study takes a deep look at the connection between shift work and type 2 diabetes. Investigators leveraged data on hundreds of thousands of people in the UK Biobank to better understand how shift work -- especially frequent night work -- contributes to the likelihood of type 2 diabetes. The team also developed a genetic risk score for type 2 diabetes, examining genetic data for tens of thousands of workers in the database. A new study takes a deep look at the connection between shift work and type 2 diabetes. Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital leveraged data on hundreds of thousands of people in the UK Biobank to better understand how shift work -- especially frequent night work -- contributes to the likelihood of type 2 diabetes. The team also developed a genetic risk score for type 2 diabetes, examining genetic data for tens of thousands of workers in the database. They found that more frequent night work increased the odds of type 2 diabetes, regardless of genetic type 2 diabetes risk, among the population studied. Their results are published this week in Diabetes Care. "We see a dose-response relationship between frequency of night shift work and type 2 diabetes, where the more often people do shift work, the greater their likelihood of having the disease, regardless of genetic predisposition," said co-first author Cline Vetter, PhD who conducted this work while at the Channing Division of Network Medicine at BWH, along with co-first author Hassan S. Dashti, PhD, RD. Vetter is now an assistant professor at the U Continue reading >>

13 Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

13 Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

by Mona Morstein, ND, DHANP There are many reasons that a person may become insulin resistant, putting themselves at risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM). The following are the 13 most common risk factors. This article is excerpted from Dr. Mona Morstein’s new book: Master Your Diabetes: A Comprehensive, Integrative Approach for Both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2017) and is reprinted with permission from the publisher. 13 Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes 1. Genetics Unlike Type 1 Diabetes, which has a minor familial genetic connection, T2DM has an established genetic inheritance. A genetic risk factor essentially means that a person is more likely to develop a condition that his or her relatives had, especially if other factors are involved. Many medical conditions are genetically associated, including arthritis, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancers, and T2DM. Luckily, genetics does not mean a person is guaranteed to develop diabetes; eating well and having a positive, active, healthy lifestyle can absolutely prevent the occurrence of the condition. 2. Overeating Overeating is one of the biggest risk factors for developing diabetes. Overeating can easily cause someone to become overweight or, even worse, obese. 3. Central Obesity When we discuss obesity and T2DM, we are mainly focusing on abdominal obesity, also known as truncal obesity and visceral fat. This is fat that is stored in the abdominal cavity around organs like the liver, pancreas, and intestines. This type of fat is worse for promoting insulin resistance than subcutaneous fat, which lies under the skin, or female fat around the hips and thighs. It is likely you have excess abdominal fat if your waist is more than 37 inches if you are male, and more than 35 i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

You are at greater risk of getting diabetes if: A close member of your family has diabetes You are white and over 40 You are black, Asian or from a minority ethnic group and over 25 years old You’re overweight If you have high blood pressure and if you have had a stroke or heart attack A women with polycystic ovary syndrome and are overweight A women and you’ve had gestational diabetes or given birth to a baby over 10 pounds You have a severe mental health condition, such as depression,schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, and you're taking medication for it You've been told you have impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glycaemia The more risk factors that apply to you, the greater your risk of having diabetes. The people we talked to had different ideas about what might have caused diabetes. Many believed that a family history of diabetes had predisposed them to the condition, others said it was caused by a combination of factors which included being overweight, being a heavy smoker or drinker, and not having done much exercise for years. Some people said that eating too much over many years hadn't affected them until they became middle-aged and had stopped being so active. Eating too much of the wrong kind of food and 'comfort' eating were said by several people to have contributed to their diabetes (see 'Food, Eating and Diet'). Other illnesses or health conditions, particularly having high blood pressure and high cholesterol, were also seen as contributory factors in diabetes. Some people we talked to had comorbidities (other illnesses) which had made it difficult for them to take regular exercise. Others wondered if having too much stress in their lives either through life events or because of pressure at work could have triggered diabetes. Others said t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

US Pharm. 2007;32(10):61-63. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic and progressive syndrome characterized by several metabolic factors that eventually lead to hyperglycemia. The development and progression to type 2 diabetes significantly increases morbidity and mortality, most often due to chronic complications.1 In the United States, type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions. In 2005, approximately 21 million adult Americans had diabetes, and it was estimated that an additional 1.5 million new cases would be diagnosed that same year.2 The prevalence of diabetes is only expected to rise. The financial impact of this disease state is staggering, with an estimated $132 billion directed toward the total cost of care in 2002.3 This article highlights major risk factors that are commonly associated with type 2 diabetes. The development of diabetes tends to be insidious. The presence of risk factors may precede the actual onset of the disease by several years. Many times, patients may have diabetes for several years before symptoms are apparent or a diagnosis is made. In some cases, patients have identifiable risk factors for the disease that are not addressed in a medical setting, or risk factors are addressed but not aggressively enough. Decreasing the risk of progression to diabetes may greatly lower the development of complications such as cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Pharmacists have the ability and obligation to educate patients and be further involved in their care when appropriate. Identifying risk factors to aid primary prevention is an important intervention needed to decrease the associated morbidity and mortality. Prediabetes Prediabetes refers to blood glucose impairment that is not yet classified as type 2 diabetes. W Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, And Gestational

Risk Factors For Diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, And Gestational

This article is about risk factors for diabetes mellitus. Usually just called diabetes, this is a disease that occurs when the body does not make or use insulin in the way it should. Diabetes results in a person having too much of a type of sugar, called glucose, in their blood and not enough in their cells. At least 1 in 4 people with diabetes does not know that they have the disease. Knowing risk factors for diabetes is very important for preventing the damage it can cause. If a person knows what these factors are, they can see a doctor early to find out if they have, or are at risk of, diabetes. There are three main kinds of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Each of these is briefly described below, along with their important risk factors. Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body makes no or very little insulin. It affects around 5 percent of those with diabetes. It is treated with either insulin injections or an insulin pump, along with diet. The main risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history. Having a parent or sibling with type 1 diabetes increases the chances of a person having the same type. If both parents have type 1, the risk is even higher. Age. Type 1 diabetes usually affects younger people. Ages 4 to 7 and ages 10 to 14 are the most common. Type 1 diabetes may occur at other ages, although it does so less often. Genetics. Having certain genes may increase the risk of type 1 diabetes. Your doctor can check for these genes. Where a person lives. Studies have found more type 1 diabetes the further away from the equator a person lives. There may be other risk factors for type 1 diabetes. Researchers are currently investigating these. Type 2 diabetes The body can still make some insulin, but is not able to use it the way it Continue reading >>

Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes

Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a number of diseases that involve problems with the hormone insulin. While not everyone with type 2 diabetes is overweight, obesity and lack of physical activity are two of the most common causes of this form of diabetes. It is also responsible for about 90% to 95% of diabetes cases in the United States, according to the CDC. This article will give you a better understanding of the causes of type 2 diabetes, what happens in the body when type 2 diabetes occurs, and specific health problems that increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Each section links to more in-depth information on that topic. In a healthy person, the pancreas (an organ behind the stomach) releases insulin to help the body store and use the sugar from the food you eat. Diabetes happens when one or more of the following occurs: When the pancreas does not produce any insulin. When the pancreas produces very little insulin. When the body does not respond appropriately to insulin, a condition called "insulin resistance." Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin; however, the insulin their pancreas secretes is either not enough or the body is unable to recognize the insulin and use it properly (insulin resistance). When there isn't enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) can't get into the body's cells and builds up in the bloodstream instead. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it causes damage in multiple areas of the body. Also, since cells aren't getting the glucose they need, they can't function properly. To understand why insulin is important, it helps to know more about how the body uses food for energy. Your body is made up of millions of cells. To make energy, these cells need food in a Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

Risk Factors for Developing Type 2 Diabetes There are several risk factors to developing Type 2 Diabetes, some of which you can control and others that are hereditary or unable to be changed. Although you cannot change your heredity, you can make vast improvements in your lifestyle that will reduce your chances of developing diabetes. The more risk factors you have the greater your chances of developing diabetes and other health related issues. Fixed Risk Factors Risk factors that cannot be changed. Age:The older you are, the more your risks of developing diabetes increase. Eighteen percent of people over the age of 65 have diabetes; eight percent between ages 21 and 64. Family History:If you have an immediate family member (parent, brother or sister) with diabetes, you have a 40 percent increased risk of developing diabetes. Ethnicity:You are predisposed to develop diabetes if you are Alaska Native, American Indian (three times the risk), African American (1.7 times the risk), Hispanic/Latino (two times the risk), Asian American, or Pacific Islander. History ofGestational Diabetes:2-5 percent of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. Forty percent of women that had Gestational Diabetes will develop diabetes in later years. Giving birth to a baby weighing more than nine pounds may signal an increased risk for the mother to develop diabetes in the future. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): A common endocrine disorder among females. PCOS is the most frequent endocrine problem in women of reproductive age. It is also one of the leading causes of subfertility in women. If not treated, PCOS can lead to development of diabetes. Modifiable Risk Factors Risk factors that you have control of or can be changed. Weight:The more overweight, and the longer you are overweight, Continue reading >>

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