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Risk Assessment For Someone With Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes

Recent statistics indicate that 3.5 million people in the UK have diabetes, while an estimated half a million additional people have the condition but are unaware that they have it. The number of people with diabetes in the UK is expected to rise to more than 5 million by 2025. Currently, the condition costs the NHS around £10 billion a year. Diabetes is a chronic condition whereby the body is not able to regulate its glucose levels due to abnormal metabolism. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 is the less common of the two. In this condition, the body is not able to make insulin on its own to manage blood glucose levels. It usually affects children and young adults. Type 2 is much more common and mainly affects adults. In this condition, the body doesn't produce enough insulin to manage blood glucose levels and/or the cells in the body can’t use it correctly. Although not fully understood, certain factors increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. These include; age, weight, body fat distribution, lack of physical activity, family history and ethnicity. It's a very common lifelong health condition that doesn’t hinder people’s ability to get a job or to keep one. People with diabetes should be assessed on their individual ability to do a job and not be discriminated against simply because they have the condition. Nevertheless, some key areas of employment have restrictions on people with insulin-dependent diabetes. These include: driving long goods vehicles or those carrying passengers, i.e. jobs where people need to have a Group 2 licence the armed forces jobs in the aviation industry, such as airline pilots and, in some cases, cabin crew and air traffic control personnel working offshore, for example on oil rigs and ships. There can also be restrictions in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Assessment

Diabetes Risk Assessment

Take our diabetes risk assessment to learn more about your risk of having or developing diabetes. Talk to your doctor to see if additional testing is required. Services Diabetes Center Diabetes Risk Assessment You could have Type 2 diabetes and not know it! Take the test below to help you determine if you are at risk. If you score 5 or higher, you are at increased risk for having Type 2 diabetes. However, only your doctor can tell for sure if you do have Type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes. Talk to your doctor to see if additional testing is needed. 3. If you are a woman, have you ever been diagnosed with gestational diabetes? 4. Do you have a mother, father, sister or brother with diabetes? 5. Have you ever been diagnosed with high blood pressure? 7. What is your weight status? If you weigh less than the amount in the left column (0 points). Adapted from the American Diabetes Association's Diabetes Risk Test. Welcome to MedCare Equipment Company, a premier provider of home medical equipment (HME), supplies and respiratory care products. As an innovative leader in HME, we can help those with a temporary need or chronic issues meet the demands of daily living in a variety of settings. A hospitalist is a doctor who specializes in caring for hospitalized patients only. Excela Health hospitalists are board certified physicians with expertise in hospital-based medicine. Our hospitalists direct your care during your hospital stay and provide information related to your hospitalization to your primary care physician. Excela Healths Family Additions Maternity Center at our Westmoreland Hospital campus delivers award-winning quality care in family-friendly surroundings. To do that takes more than just a high level of attentive care. It also requires well-trained people, from physic Continue reading >>

Working With Diabetes

Working With Diabetes

Health , Risk assessment , Risk assessment More than two million people in the UK suffer from diabetes and around 300 more are diagnosed each day. However, many of us don't know what causes the condition and how serious it can be. Becky Allen considers the workplace implications of a common but much-misunderstood condition. For such a common condition - more than two million people in the UK suffer from it and around 300 more are diagnosed each day - diabetes is surrounded by myths and misconceptions. We may know that diabetics can suffer from so-called "hypos" - and that when they do, they need sugar - but many of us don't know what causes the condition, how serious it can be, and what impact diabetes has in the workplace. According to Caroline Butler, a care advisor at the charity Diabetes UK, "A common myth is that, compared with type 1 diabetes, type 2 is mild. In fact, both types are serious because they can lead to long-term complications like heart disease, kidney disease, increased risk of stroke, and blindness. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population." Perhaps because of misconceptions about the condition, until recently people with diabetes were often actively discriminated against at work: having diabetes meant an automatic bar to careers in some professions, including the emergency services. But changes to the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) in 2004 mean only the armed forces remain exempt from the Act's provisions. Diabetes UK believes that while discrimination still occurs, many employers are getting the message that if the condition is well controlled, people with diabetes are able to do almost all jobs safely. "There was a huge blanket ban on some professions, but since 2004 there's been a massive improvement," says Continue reading >>

Encouraging People To Have A Risk Assessment For Type 2 Diabetes And Identifying Those At Risk

Encouraging People To Have A Risk Assessment For Type 2 Diabetes And Identifying Those At Risk

Encouraging people to have a risk assessment for type 2 diabetes and identifying those at risk Your responsibility when using NICE advice This interactive flowchart covers preventing type 2 diabetes using interventions aimed at individuals, populations and communities. Preventing type 2 diabetes involves adopting a healthy, balanced diet, achieving and maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active and reducing the time spent being sedentary. Successful prevention involves a comprehensive approach that combines population and community-based interventions with interventions targeted at people who are at high risk. At the population or community level, action is recommended as part of an integrated package of local measures to promote health and prevent a range of non-communicable diseases, including cardiovascular disease and some cancers. National action is also recommended to address the adverse environmental factors driving the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes. The focus is on early intervention among high-risk groups and the general population (adults under 74, in particular, those from black and minority ethnic groups and those from lower socioeconomic groups ). At an individual level, the recommendations focus on how to identify adults who are at high risk and provide them with a quality-assured, evidence-based, intensive lifestyle-change programme . The recommendations for high risk individuals can be used alongside the NHS Health Check programme. 14 September 2017 New recommendations on intensive lifestyle-change programmes and metformin for people at risk of type 2 diabetes have been added to high risk , risk identification and intensive lifestyle-change programmes and offer metformin or orlistat to support lifestyle change as the NICE guideline Continue reading >>

Diabetes Online Risk Assessment

Diabetes Online Risk Assessment

Sorry, we're unable to find stores near that location. Please try again or use a different postcode or place name. Find out your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in the next 10 years by answering a few simple questions Type 2 diabetes is a common condition which affects over three million people in the UK, but many more are at risk of getting it. The good news is that with our online risk assessment, developed by Diabetes UK, you can learn if you're at risk and take active, positive steps towards keeping it as low as possible. It only takes a few minutes to complete, so why not give it a go? If you'd prefer, you can pop into your local store and speak with one of our pharmacy teams. What can I do to help manage my Type 2 diabetes risk? You're already doing a great job, but still take a look at the links below - they might give you some ideas to help you keep up the good work. Maybe there are still some small changes you can make that will help to keep your risk low, whilst giving you other health benefits. There are some simple steps you can take to manage your risk. Have a look at some of the links below to see what you can do. Remember, there are loads of other health benefits from taking gentle exercise, having a healthy diet and from stopping smoking. See your GP to discuss your risk and for ways you can manage your risk. If you submitted your email address when taking your online assessment, we'll email you a letter which you can print out to take with you. Take a look at some of our suggestions below and speak to your GP about how these may help you to feel more in control of your health. If you're worried or have any questions about your risk assessment, your local pharmacist will also be happy to talk these through with you. If you are severely overweight spe Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Risk Assessment In Patients With Diabetes

Cardiovascular Risk Assessment In Patients With Diabetes

MarcelloCasacciaBertoluci 1 , 2 , 3 Email author and Although patients with diabetes have 2 to 4 times increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than individuals without diabetes, recent studies indicate that a significant part of patients are in a lower cardiovascular risk category. Men younger than 35years, women younger than 45years, patients with diabetes duration of less than 10years without other risk factors have a much lower risk than patients who have traditional cardiovascularrisk factors, andsubclinical or established coronary artery disease (CAD). These patients are not risk equivalent as stated in previous studies. On the contrary, when in the presence of traditional risk factors or evidence of subclinical coronary disease (e.g. high coronary calcium score), the coronary risk is much increased and patients may be classified at a higher-risk category. Recent guidelines do not anymore consider diabetes as a CAD risk equivalent and recommend cardiovascular risk stratification for primary prevention. Stratification ofdiabetic patients improves accuracy in prediction of subclinical CAD, silent ischemia and future cardiovascular events. Stratification also discriminates higher from lower risk patients who may need intensive statin or aspirin prevention, while avoiding overtreatment in lower risk cases. It may also allow the clinician to decide whether to intensify risk reduction actions through specific newer drugs for glucose control such as SGLT-2 inhibitors or GLP-1 agonists, which recently have shown additional cardiovascular protector effect. This review addresses the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk using traditional and non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors. It also reviews the use of risk calculators and new reclassification Continue reading >>

Developing Risk Assessment Tools For Type 2 Diabetes

Developing Risk Assessment Tools For Type 2 Diabetes

Developing risk assessment tools for Type 2 diabetes Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a common metabolic disorder, preceded by a pre-diabetic state of impaired glucose regulation (IGR), from which the progression to diabetes is more likely, but not inevitable. T2DM and IGR are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, largely due to cardiovascular complications. Because these conditions are often asymptomatic, many cases remain undiagnosed and untreated. Population-based screening studies have revealed that 1/5 participants have undiagnosed IGR/T2DM, with much higher rates in Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) populations. Screening for diabetes in certain groups has been recommended in order to detect cases before complications develop. Leicester has a multi-ethnic population. Figures from the 2001 census showed that ethnic minorities make up around 30 per cent of the population predominantly of Indian origin (25.7 per cent). South Asians have a much higher risk of T2DM than White Europeans. Accurately identifying people who are at an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, or impaired glucose regulation (IGR), helps healthcare professionals effectively target screening tests. University Hospitals Leicester, working with Leicester University, decided to find a way to better identify patients at risk of already having or developing IGR or Type 2 diabetes. The aim of the project was to develop two tools for identifying those at risk of Type 2 diabetes or IGR. A self-assessment score for people from a multi-ethnic population to assess their own risk, developed in partnership with Diabetes UK An automated tool for identifying people at risk using GP practice databases. Risk scores can be used to identify those at high risk of diabetes. Various risk scores ha Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment - Health Encyclopedia - University Of Rochester Medical Center

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment - Health Encyclopedia - University Of Rochester Medical Center

From the answers you gave us, it appears that you have only 1 risk factor for type 2 diabetes: your age. Being older than 44 raises your risk somewhat. The ADA recommends that you talk with your health care provider about having a screening test for diabetes every 3 years. From the answers you gave us, it appears that, in addition to your age, you have other risk factors for diabetes. Because you have these risk factors, you should talk with your health care provider about getting a screening test for diabetes. The ADA recommends that people with risk factors be checked for diabetes every 3 years, or more often if their health care provider recommends it. From the answers you gave us, it appears that you have 1 risk factor for diabetes: your weight. Your body mass index (BMI) is . A BMI of 25 to 29.9 puts you in the overweight category. A BMI of 30 or higher puts you in the obese category. The ADA reports that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by keeping weight in control and by getting more exercise. Talk with your health care provider about your risks for diabetes. From the answers you gave us, it appears that you have 2 or more risk factors for diabetes. One risk factor is your weight. Your body mass index (BMI) is . A BMI of 25 to 29.9 puts you in the overweight category. A BMI of 30 or higher puts you in the obese category. The ADA reports that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by keeping weight in control and by getting more exercise. Your other risk factor(s) for diabetes are:. Talk with your health care provider about your weight and your other risks for diabetes. The responses you have given us show that you do not have any risk factors for diabetes at this time. The ADA recommends that people begin to have tests to check for diabetes at ag Continue reading >>

Risk Assessment In Diabetes Management: How Do General Practitioners Estimate Risks Due To Diabetes?

Risk Assessment In Diabetes Management: How Do General Practitioners Estimate Risks Due To Diabetes?

Risk assessment in diabetes management: how do general practitioners estimate risks due to diabetes? Bertram Hussler, Institut fr Gesundheits und Sozialforschung, Berlin, Germany Gisela C Fischer, Medizinische Fakultt der Universitt Hannover, Hannover, Germany Sibylle Meyer, Berliner Institut fr Sozialforschung, Berlin, Germany Diethard Sturm, Deutscher Hausrzteverband eV, Kln, Germany Correspondence to: Professor Dr B Hussler Institut fr Gesundheits und Sozialforschung, Wichmannstrasse 5, 10787 Berlin, Germany; [email protected] Copyright 2007 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To evaluate the ability of general practitioners (GPs) in Germany to estimate the risk of patients with diabetes developing complications. An interview study using a structured questionnaire to estimate risks of four case vignettes having diabetesspecific complications within the next 10 years, risk reduction and life expectancy potential. A representative random sample of 584 GPs has been drawn, of which 150 could be interviewed. We compared GPs' estimates among each other (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cohen's (multirater) ) and with risks for longterm complications generated by the multifactor disease model Mellibase, which is a knowledgebased support system for medical decision management. The risk estimates by GPs varied widely (ICC 0.21 95% CI (0.13 to 0.36)). The average level of potential risk reduction was between 47% and 70%. Compared with Mellibase values, on average, the GPs overestimated the risk threefold. Mean estimates of potential prolongation of life expectancy were close to 10 years for each patient, whereas the Mellibase calculations ranged from 3 to 10 years. Overestimation could lead to unnecessary care and waste of re Continue reading >>

Diabetes And How It Can Affect A Person At Work

Diabetes And How It Can Affect A Person At Work

Many conditions can cause health issues in the workplace and long-term absence from work. One condition that is becoming increasingly prevalent is diabetes. Diabetes is the result of the body being unable to break down glucose into energy, either because the body doesn’t produce enough insulin to metabolise glucose or because the insulin produced by the body doesn’t work properly. Figures from Diabetes UK show that since 1996 the number of people with diabetes in the UK has more than doubled from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. By 2025, it is estimated that five million people will have diabetes in the UK. Types of diabetes Type 1 diabetes: Develops when the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed so the body can’t maintain normal glucose levels. This accounts for only around 10% of all cases of diabetes and is controlled through regular, life-long insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes: This occurs when the body is not making enough insulin and is most common in middle aged or older people. However, it is becoming increasingly common in younger, overweight people and is often linked to lifestyle choices. To some extent, type 2 diabetes can be controlled through diet and exercise, although many people with type 2 diabetes will require medication to control glucose levels. Diabetes – warning signs Certain symptoms can suggest the onset of diabetes, and these include: feeling very thirsty; urinating more frequently, particularly at night; increased hunger; feeling tired; weight loss or loss of muscle bulk; slow-healing cuts or wounds; blurred vision; frequent b0uts of thrush. Risk factors for diabetes Type 1 diabetes: Family history: Having a parent or sibling with the condition. Genetics: The presence of certain genes indicates an increased risk of d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Assessment

Diabetes Risk Assessment

Take the first step by learning about your risk. Every 30 seconds, a new case of diabetes is diagnosed in the U.S. Ninety-five percent are a type 2 diagnosis, the most frequent diagnosis among adults. Recognizing early warning signs and risk factors that lead to type 2 diabetes is critical to preventing diabetes before it starts. We can help you learn more about your individual risk factors so you can take charge of your health and reduce your risk. Knowing your individual risk factors can help you delay or avoid developing type 2 diabetes. The Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test below appears in some browsers and not others. If the area below is blank, CLICK HERE to take the risk test on Diabetes.org Call (405) 271-2824 to request a paper health assessment be mailed to you. If you are at risk, the first step is to see your doctor to find out if additional testing is needed. People with undiagnosed diabetes may experience some combination of the following: More frequent infections, wounds and/or sores that may be slow to heal In the abrupt onset of type 1 diabetes, these symptoms may be accompanied by stomach pains, nausea or vomiting. If you think you or a loved one might have diabetes, every day counts -- and sometimes every minute. Don't delay in visiting a clinic for testing. In the event of abrupt onset of symptoms for a child or young adult, call 9-1-1 or go straight to your nearest emergency room. Continue reading >>

Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics

Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics

Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics When an individual with diabetes is assessed for safety risk there are several aspects that must be considered. Codefree Blood Glucose Monitor/Monitoring Test/Testing Kit+Strips+Lancets+Case in mmol/L A single blood glucose test result only gives information about an individuals blood glucose level at one particular point in time. Because blood glucose levels fluctuate throughout the day (this is also true for people without diabetes), one test result is of no use in assessing the overall health of a person with diabetes. The results of a series of self-monitored blood glucose measurements over a period of time, however, can give valuable information about an individuals diabetes health. Blood glucose records should be assessed by a health care professional with expertise in diabetes . Blood Sugar Journal: Keep Record of Your Blood Sugar Often, a key factor in assessing employment safety and risk is documentation of incidents of severe hypoglycemia. An individual who has managed his or her diabetes over an extended period of time without experiencing severe hypoglycemia is unlikely to experience this condition in the future. Multiple incidents of severe hypoglycemia may in some situations be disqualifying for high-risk occupations. However, the circumstances of each incident should be examined, as some incidents can be explained due to changes in insulin dosage, illness, or other factors and thus will be unlikely to recur or have already been addressed by the individual through changes to his or her diabetes treatment regimen or education. Some individuals over time lose the ability to recognize the early warning signs of hypoglycemia. These diabetics are at increased risk f Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Workplace

Diabetes In The Workplace

Published 14/01/2015 12.26 PM | Updated 14/03/2018 10.03 AM How might diabetes affect a person at work? In the UK there are approximately 3.2 million people diagnosed with diabetes, and an estimated 630,000 people who have the condition and do not know it Whilst there is no reason why patients with diabetes should not continue to work, they should comply with recommended medical treatment, monitoring and supervision and report any deterioration in the control of their condition to you or their Diabetes Support Team. What are the employers responsibilities? For most people with diabetes the illness does not affect their ability to do their job and, under the Equality Act 2010 , it is unlawful for employers to operate a blanket ban on the recruitment of people with diabetes. Some jobs, however, especially those involving safety-critical activities (e.g. police, fire and ambulance services) should now be subject to individual medical assessments. There are also restrictions in place for jobs involving some driving duties including large goods vehicles (LGVs) or passenger-carrying vehicles, so occupational health advice should be sought on the suitability of employees to undertake such duties. Patients with diabetes may struggle with undertaking shift work due to the changes to the timing of medication and diet. Further advice on fitness to work should be sought if an employee with diabetes feels unable to cope with the demands of shift and night work. It is essential that employers undertake a risk assessment in collaboration with the employee. The assessment must include consideration of the following: Whether the person will have access to regular meal breaks. The level and regularity of activity undertaken in the course of the persons duties as this affects circulating Continue reading >>

Risk Assessment Tools For Identifying Individuals At Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

Risk Assessment Tools For Identifying Individuals At Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

Risk Assessment Tools for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Correspondence to Professor Matthias B. Schulze, Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany (e-mail: [email protected] ). Search for other works by this author on: Epidemiologic Reviews, Volume 33, Issue 1, 1 July 2011, Pages 4662, Brian Buijsse, Rebecca K. Simmons, Simon J. Griffin, Matthias B. Schulze; Risk Assessment Tools for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes, Epidemiologic Reviews, Volume 33, Issue 1, 1 July 2011, Pages 4662, Trials have demonstrated the preventability of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modifications or drugs in people with impaired glucose tolerance. However, alternative ways of identifying people at risk of developing diabetes are required. Multivariate risk scores have been developed for this purpose. This article examines the evidence for performance of diabetes risk scores in adults by 1) systematically reviewing the literature on available scores and 2) their validation in external populations; and 3) exploring methodological issues surrounding the development, validation, and comparison of risk scores. Risk scores show overall good discriminatory ability in populations for whom they were developed. However, discriminatory performance is more heterogeneous and generally weaker in external populations, which suggests that risk scores may need to be validated within the population in which they are intended to be used. Whether risk scores enable accurate estimation of absolute risk remains unknown; thus, care is needed when using scores to communicate absolute diabetes risk to individuals. Several risk scores predict diabet Continue reading >>

Conduct A Health Risk Assessment

Conduct A Health Risk Assessment

To receive email updates about Diabetes at Work (DAW) enter your email address: Conduct a Health Risk Assessment or Employee Health Survey Conduct a health risk assessment (HRA) or employee health survey to gain information about the current health status of employees, their health concerns and goals. Worksite interventions may use an assessment of health risks with feedback (AHRF) alone or as part of a broader worksite health promotion program that includes health education and other health promotion components offered as follow-up to the HRA. The Community Guide to Prevention Services defines the use of HRA and feedback as follows: An assessment of personal health habits and risk factors (that may be used in combination with biomedical measurements of physiologic health). A quantitative estimation or qualitative assessment of future risk of death and other adverse health outcomes. Provision of feedback in the form of educational messages and counseling that describes how changing one or more behavioral risk factors might change the risk of disease or death. Employee health risk assessments or health surveys help individuals to: Identify steps they can take to improve their health. For employers, an employee health risk assessment or health survey can help to: Provide an overall indication of wellness across the company. Identify opportunities to reduce future health care cost through early intervention and risk reduction. Contribute to goal setting, designing, and evaluating your worksite wellness program and diabetes prevention and management efforts. Serve as a critical element of the business case for management. Assessment or survey results can be sorted by employee characteristics such as age, race and ethnicity, type of job function, height, weight and health c Continue reading >>

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