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Rice And Diabetes Risk

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Harvard Study: Eating White Rice Increases Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes | Asian Scientist Magazine | Science, Technology And Medical News Updates From Asia

Harvard Study: Eating White Rice Increases Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes | Asian Scientist Magazine | Science, Technology And Medical News Updates From Asia

Harvard Study: Eating White Rice Increases Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes A recent Harvard study has discovered a link between higher white rice intake and a significantly elevated risk of type 2 diabetes, especially among Asian populations. AsianScientist (Mar. 19, 2012) The risk of type 2 diabetes is significantly increased if white rice is eaten regularly, says a study published last Friday in the journal BMJ. Led by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health, the goal of the study was to determine whether this diabetes risk is dependent on the amount of rice consumed and if the association is stronger for the Asian population, who tend to eat more white rice than the Western world. On average, Chinese populations eat an average of four portions a day while those in the Western world eat less than five portions a week. The authors analyzed the results of four studies: two in Asian countries (China and Japan) and two in Western countries (USA and Australia). All participants were diabetes free at study baseline. A significant trend was found in both Asian and Western countries with a stronger association found amongst women than men. The more white rice eaten, the higher the risk of type 2 diabetes: with each increased serving of white rice (assuming 158 g per serving) contributing to a 10 percent increase in the risk of type 2 diabetes. In summary, this meta-analysis suggests that higher white rice intake is associated with a significantly elevated risk of type 2 diabetes, especially among Asian populations, the authors write. The recent transition in nutrition characterised by dramatically decreased physical activity levels and much improved security and variety of food has led to increased prevalence of obesity and insulin resistance in Asian countries. White r Continue reading >>

Eating Brown Rice To Cut Diabetes Risk

Eating Brown Rice To Cut Diabetes Risk

Francesco Tonelli for The New York Times Next time you order takeout wonton soup and a spicy Number 82, you might want to make sure it comes with brown rice. Brown rice is a whole grain — white rice before it has been refined and polished and stripped of the bran covering, which is high in fiber and nutrients. Brown rice also has a lower glycemic index than white rice, which means it doesn’t cause blood glucose levels to rise as rapidly. Now a new study from researchers at Harvard reports that Americans who eat two or more servings of brown rice a week reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by about 10 percent compared to people who eat it less than once a month. And those who eat white rice on a regular basis — five or more times a week — are almost 20 percent more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who eat it less than once a month. Just replacing a third of a serving of white rice with brown each day could reduce one’s risk of Type 2 diabetes by 16 percent, a statistical analysis showed. A serving is half a cup of cooked rice. The study, which was published in The Archives of Internal Medicine and used data from two Harvard nurses’ health studies and a separate study of health professionals, isn’t the first to point a finger at foods like white rice as a culprit in Type 2 diabetes. A 2007 study of Chinese women in Shanghai found that middle-aged women who ate large amounts of white rice and other refined carbohydrates were also at increased risk for diabetes compared to their peers who ate less. But the Harvard study is one of the first to distinguish between brown rice and white rice consumption in the United States, where rice is not a staple food and relatively little is eaten overall, said Dr. Qi Sun, an instructor in medicine at Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

When it comes to your risk of diabetes, a new study by Harvard researchers suggests that eating less white rice could make a difference. Each additional daily serving of white rice, a staple of Asian diets, may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 10%, according to the study, which analyzed the results of four previous studies involving 352,384 participants from four countries: China, Japan, U.S. and Australia. Those who ate the highest amounts of white rice had a 27% higher risk of diabetes than those who ate the least, and the risk was most pronounced in Asian people. The studies followed people for anywhere from 4 to 22 years, tracking their food intake. All the participants were diabetes-free at the beginning of the study. MORE: Five Ways to Avoid Diabetes — Without Medications Why white rice may impact diabetes risk isn’t clear, but it may have to do with the food’s high score on the glycemic index (GI) — a measurement of how foods affect blood sugar levels — meaning that it can cause spikes in blood sugar. High GI ranking foods have previously been associated with increased risk of diabetes. “White rice also lacks nutrients like fiber and magnesium,” says study author Qi Sun, a professor of medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. “People with high white rice consumption lack these beneficial nutrients and Asian populations consume a lot of white rice. If you consume brown rice instead, you will get these nutrients. There are alternatives.” But before you swear off white rice for good, the study authors and other nutrition experts caution that it’s not the only culprit in diabetes risk. Rather, a general decrease in physical activity and increase in food consumption may be responsible for the rise in obesity and insulin res Continue reading >>

If White Rice Is Linked To Diabetes, What About China?

If White Rice Is Linked To Diabetes, What About China?

“The fact the cohorts used to determine this study’s conclusions (BMJ published meta analysis) failed to consider incredibly relevant diabetes confounders like family history of diabetes, socioeconomic status, and dietary consumption patterns, including the dietary consumption of other categories of refined grains, makes quantifying the effect on diabetes development due to white rice consumption from this data set impossible. And yet it was published in the BMJ?” At the end of the press release it says this: “In an accompanying editorial, Dr Bruce Neal from the University of Sydney suggests that more, bigger studies are needed to substantiate the research hypothesis that white rice increases the chances of getting type 2 diabetes.” But then the title says: “White Rice Increases Risk of Type 2 Diabetes” Im understandably upset at this. Continue reading >>

Is White Rice To Blame For Skyrocketing Type 2 Diabetes In China?

Is White Rice To Blame For Skyrocketing Type 2 Diabetes In China?

Rice has been a staple food for 5,000 years, yet some new studies and news headlines suggest that each additional daily serving of it increases your risk of type 2 diabetes by 11 percent. In the Nutritionfacts.org video below, Dr. Michael Greger reviews the research linking white rice consumption with the rise in type 2 diabetes, largely in Asian populations. The rate at which people in China and Japan are getting diabetes has skyrocketed in the past decade and is now very similar to the incidence in the United States. However, China has seven times less obesity and Japan has eight times less obesity than the United States. So what’s going on? China’s Diabetes Rate Has More Than Tripled, But Their Obesity Rate Has Not Looking at the data, Dr. Greger found that the rate of new type 2 diabetes diagnoses has sharply increased, while rice consumption has actually decreased by 30 percent. Pork, oil, and other meat consumption has sharply increased in the past 16 years. If the rise in meat consumption is to blame, then why do recent studies in Japan and China associate white rice intake with diabetes? Dr. Greger theorizes that it’s the addition of animal protein. When ingested, carbohydrates cause a spike in blood glucose, triggering the pancreas to secrete insulin. Studies show that when animal protein is added to refined carbs, that blood sugar spike is much higher. View Dr. Greger's Sources Continue reading >>

White Rice Consumption And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Meta-analysis And Systematic Review

White Rice Consumption And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Meta-analysis And Systematic Review

White rice consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: meta-analysis and systematic review White rice consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: meta-analysis and systematic review BMJ 2012; 344 doi: (Published 15 March 2012) Cite this as: BMJ 2012;344:e1454 1Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA 2Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston Correspondence to: Qi Sun qisun{at}hsph.harvard.edu Objectives To summarise evidence on the association between white rice consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes and to quantify the potential dose-response relation. Design Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Data sources Searches of Medline and Embase databases for articles published up to January 2012 using keywords that included both rice intake and diabetes; further searches of references of included original studies. Study selection Included studies were prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for type 2 diabetes by rice intake levels. Data synthesis Relative risks were pooled using a random effects model; dose-response relations were evaluated using data from all rice intake categories in each study. Results Four articles were identified that included seven distinct prospective cohort analyses in Asian and Western populations for this study. A total of 13 284 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained among 352 384 participants with follow-up periods ranging from 4 to 22 years. Asian (Chinese and Japanese) populations had much higher white rice consumption levels than did Western populations (average intake levels were three to four servings/day versus one to two servings/week). The pooled relative ris Continue reading >>

White Rice Linked To Diabetes Risk

White Rice Linked To Diabetes Risk

Study: Eating White Rice Regularly Raises Diabetes Risk March 15, 2012 -- Eating white rice regularly, as is commonly done in many Asian countries, may increase risk for developing type 2 diabetes , a new study shows. Researchers looked at data from four studies: two in Asian countries (China and Japan) and two in Western countries (the U.S. and Australia). All participants were diabetes -free when the studies began. On average, people from Asian countries ate about four servings of white rice daily. Individuals in Western countries, however, ate less than five servings a week. The study found that the more servings of white rice a person eats per day, the greater their risk for developing type 2 diabetes , the form of diabetes most closely linked to obesity . According to the new study, diabetes risk rises by about 10% with each increased serving per day of white rice. The new findings appear in the journal BMJ. The study was not designed to show how white rice may increase the risk for diabetes, but researcher Qi Sun, MD, has some theories on the matter. White rice ranks high on the glycemic index , which means it can cause a sudden spike in blood sugar levels . White rice is also low in fiber that can help lower the risk for developing diabetes, Sun says. He is an instructor in medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. Its not just white rice, either. Other white, starchy carbohydrates, such as white bread, white pasta, and white potatoes, will likely have the same effect if eaten often enough, he says. Sun suggests choosing whole grains instead of white carbs. This is not to say that a person can never eat white rice. It is all about moderation: Eating white rice one to two times per week is fine. Spyros Mezitis, MD, agrees that all white starchy f Continue reading >>

Can Eating Rice Affect My Diabetes?

Can Eating Rice Affect My Diabetes?

Having diabetes requires you to be vigilant about your diet and exercise habits. You have to watch what you eat every day to ensure that your blood sugar doesn’t rise to an unhealthy level. Monitoring the carbohydrate count and glycemic index (GI) score of the foods you eat can make controlling your diabetes easier. The GI ranks food based on how they can affect your blood sugar. If you aren’t tracking your diet, diabetes can cause more serious health problems. This includes cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, or foot infections. Rice is rich in carbohydrates and can have a high GI score. If you have diabetes, you may think that you need to skip it at the dinner, but this isn’t always the case. You can still eat rice if you have diabetes. You should avoid eating it in large portions or too frequently, though. Many types of rice exist, and some types are healthier than others. There are risks to having too much rice in your diet. A study in the British Medical Journal found that people who eat high levels of white rice may have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This means that if you have prediabetes, you should be especially conscientious about your rice intake. If you’ve already been diagnosed with diabetes, it’s generally safe for you to enjoy rice in moderation. Make sure you’re aware of the carbohydrate count and GI score for the type of rice you wish to eat. You should aim to eat between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Some varieties of rice have a lower GI score than others. The Create Your Plate method used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture is a good way to ensure your meals are portioned well. Your dinner plate should have 25 percent protein, 25 percent grains and starchy foods, and 50 percent non-starchy vegetables. Continue reading >>

Substituting Brown Rice For White Rice To Lower Diabetes Risk: A Focus-group Study In Chinese Adults - Sciencedirect

Substituting Brown Rice For White Rice To Lower Diabetes Risk: A Focus-group Study In Chinese Adults - Sciencedirect

Volume 110, Issue 8 , August 2010, Pages 1216-1221 Substituting Brown Rice for White Rice to Lower Diabetes Risk: A Focus-Group Study in Chinese Adults Get rights and content Whole-grain products, such as brown rice, have been associated with lower risk of diabetes. However, information is lacking on the acceptability of substituting brown rice for white rice. This study assessed the awareness and acceptability of brown rice in Chinese adults, and examined the feasibility of introducing brown rice into the diet through a large, long-term randomized clinical trial to lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Thirty-two Chinese adults residing in Shanghai participated in this quantitative and qualitative study using questionnaires and focus-group discussions. Most participants (30 of 32) consumed white rice daily and only a few (n=8) had tried brown rice previously. Before tasting, most participants considered brown rice inferior to white rice in terms of taste and quality. However, after tasting brown rice and learning about its nutritional value, the majority indicated greater willingness to consume brown rice. Main barriers to acceptance were the perception of rough texture and unpalatable taste, as well as higher price. All participants suggested that large-scale promotion was needed to change societal attitudes toward brown rice. In addition, most participants (27 of 32) expressed willingness to participate in a future long-term brown rice intervention study. These results provide valuable information for the design of the future brown rice intervention trial and highlight the importance of increasing awareness about the nutritional value of brown rice. Continue reading >>

Does Eating Brown Rice Lower Diabetes Risk?

Does Eating Brown Rice Lower Diabetes Risk?

White or brown rice might be a matter of taste. But people who substitute brown rice for white rice for health reasons may be onto something, a new study from Harvard University implies. Yet doctors warn that there's more to this effect than the nutrition in rice alone. Researchers drew on data from over 200,000 subjects and found that those who ate five or more servings of white rice a week had a 17 percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with those who rarely ate white rice. What's more, they found that those who ate brown rice regularly were overall less likely to develop diabetes. With those results, researchers estimated that subbing in a few servings a week of white rice with brown would result in a 16 percent decrease in diabetes risk. Play But diet and diabetes experts say these results may have more to do with type of person who tends to prefer brown rice than how the food itself affects health. "Maybe people who eat brown rice are more health conscious," said Dr. Charles Clark, professor of medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine. Because the study can only gauge associations between lifestyle choices and later disease, it's impossible to tell whether it's the rice that makes a difference or some other shared quality among brown rice eaters, he said. Indeed, researchers found that brown rice eaters as a group tended to be more physically active, leaner, less likely to smoke, and perhaps most importantly, had a higher intake of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains -- all choices that help lower risk of developing diabetes. "I think whole grains may be the big player and not brown rice alone," says Carla Wolper, a researcher at the N.Y. Obesity Research Center. But making the switch from white to brown rice may be a relatively pai Continue reading >>

White Rice, Brown Rice, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Us Men And Women

White Rice, Brown Rice, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Us Men And Women

White Rice, Brown Rice, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in US Men and Women Dr. Qi Sun , MD, ScD, Dr. Donna Spiegelman , ScD, Dr. Rob M. van Dam , PhD, Dr. Michelle D. Holmes , MD, DrPH, Ms. Vasanti S. Malik , MSc, Dr. Walter C. Willett , MD, DrPH, and Dr. Frank B. Hu , MD, PhD Departments of Nutrition (Ms. Malik and Drs. Sun, van Dam, Willett, and Hu), Epidemiology (Ms. Malik and Drs. Spiegelman, van Dam, Holmes, Willett, and Hu), and Biostatistics (Dr. Spiegelman.), Harvard School of Public Health; the Channing Laboratory (Drs. van Dam, Holmes, Willett, and Hu), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School; all at Boston, MA 02115 Corresponding author: Qi Sun, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115. Tel: 617 432 7490 Fax: 617 432 2435, [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Arch Intern Med This article has been corrected. See the correction in volume 170 onpage1479. See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Because of a different degree of processing and nutrient contents, brown rice and white rice may have different effects on risk of type 2 diabetes. To prospectively examine white rice and brown rice consumptions in relation to type 2 diabetes risk in US men and women aged 2687 yr. The Health Professionals Follow-up Study (19862006) and the Nurses Health Study I (19842006) and II (19912005). We prospectively ascertained diet, lifestyle practices, and disease status among 39,765 men and 157,463 women in these cohorts. All participants were free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline. Intake of white rice, brown rice, other foods, and nutrients was assessed at baseline and updated every 24 yea Continue reading >>

Brown Rice Instead Of White May Lower Diabetes Risk

Brown Rice Instead Of White May Lower Diabetes Risk

(Health.com) -- The next time you order Chinese food or need a side dish to serve with dinner, you're better off choosing brown rice instead of white. Eating more brown rice and cutting back on white rice may reduce your risk of diabetes, a new study reports. "People at risk of diabetes should pay attention to carbohydrates in their diet and replace refined carbohydrates with whole grains," says the lead author of the study, Dr. Qi Sun, M.D., a nutrition researcher at the Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston, Massachusetts. If you eat a little more than two servings of white rice (about 12 ounces) per week, switching to brown rice will lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 16 percent, Sun and his colleagues estimate. And if you replace those servings of white rice with whole grains in general, they estimate, your diabetes risk will decline even further, by 36 percent. White rice is produced by removing the husk-like outer layers of brown rice. Those discarded layers contain nutrients (such as magnesium and insoluble fiber) that have been shown to guard against diabetes, which may in part explain the study's findings, Sun says. White rice may also contribute to diabetes risk because it causes blood-sugar levels to rise more rapidly than brown rice does. (This is known as having a higher glycemic index.) Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body loses its sensitivity to insulin, a hormone that helps convert blood sugar (glucose) into energy. The result is that blood sugar, which is toxic at high levels, can creep into the danger zone. Eating lots of foods with a high glycemic index-- such as refined carbohydrates-- has been linked to diabetes risk in the past. "White rice is digested much faster and converted into sugar in your blood much quicker, so your bod Continue reading >>

White Rice Linked To Type 2 Diabetes, Study Says

White Rice Linked To Type 2 Diabetes, Study Says

White Rice Linked to Type 2 Diabetes, Study Says Credit: Kakarlapudi Venkata Sivanaga Raju | Dreamstime Eating white rice regularly may raise your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. The results showed that people who ate three to four servings of white rice a day were more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than people who ate one to two servings a week. And the more white rice eaten, the higher the risk of Type 2 diabetes; the authors estimated that the diabetes risk rises by 11 percent with each increased daily serving of white rice . The study suggested an association, not a cause-and-effect link. Neither doctors nor patients should take "large-scale action" based on the findings; more work is needed to substantiate the idea that white rice increases the chances of getting Type 2 diabetes, according to Bruce Neal, a professor of medicine at the University of Sydney in Australia, who was not involved in the research but who wrote an editorial accompanying the study in the journal. Still, "diet-related ill health is now widely believed to be the leading cause of chronic disease around the world," and more work needs to be done to find ways to prevent and treat such diseases, Neal wrote. In the study, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston looked at four previous studies examining the link between eating white rice and the risk of Type 2 diabetes two done in Asian countries (China and Japan) and two in Western countries (the U.S. and Australia). The researchers said they were looking to see whether the link between eating white rice and developing diabetes was stronger among people in Asia, who tend to eat more white rice than Westerners. The studies, which ranged in length from four to 22 years, included a total of about 352 Continue reading >>

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