diabetestalk.net

Reversing Diabetes Type 1

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes Without Insulin Replacement

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes Without Insulin Replacement

Project Researcher: Subhadra Gunawardana, Ph.D. – Washington University, St. Louis Project Description Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a serious disease affecting 3 million Americans, with over 15,000 children being diagnosed each year (1). Traditional treatments involve insulin replacement, either directly or via islet/pancreas transplantation, and have numerous limitations. Exogenous insulin administration is obviously inconvenient, and can be dangerous due to potentially fatal dips in blood glucose. Pancreas transplantation, the only available long-term remedy, requires major invasive surgery. Islet transplantation is safer but less effective, as patients return to diabetes in the long term. Both islet and pancreas transplantation are limited by the availability of donor tissue and the need for life-long immunosuppression. Thus there is an ongoing need for better therapies. The ultimate goal in treating T1D is to restore blood glucose control. We recently demonstrated an entirely novel approach to restore normal blood glucose without insulin, thereby avoiding the aforementioned complications. Transplanting healthy embryonic brown adipose tissue (BAT) under the skin of type 1 diabetic mice results in dramatic restoration of glucose control and reversal of diabetes, with no contribution from insulin. While insulin remains low as is typical with T1D, BAT transplant recipients show progressive weight gain and reversal of all clinical signs of diabetes, accompanied by an increase in healthy fat (adipose tissue) content in the body. Adipose tissue is a versatile endocrine organ which secretes hundreds of hormones affecting all body systems, and exerts a profound influence on blood glucose regulation. Healthy adipose tissue is a powerful asset, which helps improve overall metabo Continue reading >>

Has Anyone Been Successful In Reversing Type 1 Diabetes?

Has Anyone Been Successful In Reversing Type 1 Diabetes?

The reversal of type 1 diabetes, or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM), is a topic that is perpetually controversial. Many diagnosed as having IDDM are told that a cure should be available “in the next ten years”. Diabetics have been hearing these words since the 1950’s. True, the first pancreatic transplant occurred in 1966[1], but a cure that is available to the entire diabetes community has yet to be discovered. The work to achieve a cure for type 1 diabetes is extensive and involves a number of different approaches. Pancreatic transplants, islet cell transplants, artificial closed-loop insulin delivery systems, and targeted supplementation with extreme dietary management have all been explored. Pancreatic Transplants Transplanting the whole pancreas into a patient with type 1 diabetes has proven somewhat successful for patients who are experiencing advanced diabetic complications. Despite appearing to be a viable treatment for restoring insulin independence, the procedure itself is highly invasive (often involving the replacement of both the pancreas and the kidneys), and requires the ongoing use of immunosuppressants to protect against the rejection of the transplanted tissue(s)[2]. Islet Cell Transplants Transplanting only the insulin-producing islet cells makes this procedure significantly less invasive than a pancreatic transplant. Unfortunately, this method is limited by several factors: The technology available to obtain a sufficient quantity of islet cells (more than twice the number of donor organs are needed compared to pancreatic transplantation) Patients are also required to adhere to immunosuppressive therapy to prevent against islet cell rejection Islet cells can be transplanted into the recipient’s body either through the portal vein or Continue reading >>

Immunotherapy May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes Laurie Toich, Assistant Editor Publish Date: Friday, December 08, 2017

Immunotherapy May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes Laurie Toich, Assistant Editor Publish Date: Friday, December 08, 2017

Immunotherapy May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes Researchers recently cured type 1 diabetes (T1D) by infusing mice models with blood stem cells that are engineered to overproduce the PD-L1 protein, which is deficient in T1D, according to a study published by Science Translational Research. The experimental approach was observed to dampen the autoimmune reaction against pancreatic islet cells in both humans and mice. Additionally, the infusion reversed the condition in mice models, according to the study authors. Notably, nearly all of the mice achieved short-term reversal of diabetes, with one-third maintaining normal blood glucose levels throughout their lives, according to the study. If similar results are achieved in humans, infusions of modified blood stem cells may provide a cure for T1D. Theres really a reshaping of the immune system when you inject these cells, said senior investigator Paolo Fiorina, MD. When administered in mice, the stem cells traveled to the pancreas where insulin-producing cells are formed. The authors noted that the immunotherapy was effective regardless of whether PD-L1 production was increased via gene therapy or small molecule therapy. Previous research has explored immunotherapy for T1D in an attempt to inhibit the bodys attack on islet cells; however, these approaches have been unsuccessful. The authors of the current study found that autologous bone marrow transplants have been able to reboot certain patients immune systems but not others, according to the study. Blood stem cells have immune-regulatory abilities, but it appears that in mice and humans with diabetes, these abilities are impaired, Dr Fiorina said. We found that in diabetes, blood stem cells are defective, promoting inflammation and possibly leading to the onset of disease. The Continue reading >>

Will Diabetes Go Away?

Will Diabetes Go Away?

There is no cure for diabetes. Neither type 1 (juvenile onset or insulin-requiring) diabetes or type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes ever goes away. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period" shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period" diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months to a year. The patient's insulin needs are minimal and some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin. It would be a mistake to assume that the diabetes has gone away, however. Basically, type 1 diabetes occurs when about 90 percent of the body's insulin-producing cells have been destroyed. At the time that type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most patients still are producing some insulin. If obvious symptoms of type 1 diabetes emerge when the patient has an illness, virus or cold, for example, once the illness subsides the body's insulin needs may decrease. At this point, the number of insulin-producing cells remaining may be enough — for the moment — to meet the person's insulin needs again. But the process that has destroyed 90 percent of the insulin-producing cells will ultimately destroy the remaining insulin-producing cells. And as that destruction continues, the amount of injected insulin the patient needs will increase — and ultimately the patient will be totally dependent on insulin injections. Scientists now think that it is important for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to continue taking some insulin by injection even during the honeymoon period. Why? Because they have some scientific evidence to suggest that doing so will help preserve the few remaining insulin-producing cells for a while longer. Patients diagnosed wi Continue reading >>

Faux Fasting Diet Regenerates Pancreas To Reverse Diabetes

Faux Fasting Diet Regenerates Pancreas To Reverse Diabetes

Using stem cells to create insulin-producing beta cells that could be transplanted into diabetics is being investigated as a possible cure for type 1 diabetes and treatment for type 2, but new research suggests that a special diet could reprogram cells in the pancreas to do the same thing. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) claim that a diet that mimics the effects of fasting spurs the growth of new insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreases of mice, essentially reversing the disease. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes center around insulin, or rather, the lack thereof. Put very simply, in type 1 diabetes, the body – specifically, the pancreas – stops producing insulin, while in type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't use insulin properly and eventually is unable to produce enough insulin to compensate. In both type 1 and late-stage type 2 diabetes, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are lost, meaning many diabetics need to take insulin to replace what's not being made by the pancreas. Looking to discover the effects of a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) on diabetes sufferers, USC researchers used mice with type 2 diabetes and another group in which type 1 diabetes had been simulated by giving them high doses of a drug to kill their insulin-producing beta cells. They found that mice in both groups – even those in the later stages of the disease – regained healthy insulin production, had a reduction in insulin resistance, and had more stable blood glucose levels. The researchers say the brief, periodic diet, which was designed to mimic the effects of a water-only fast, activated genes that are normally only switched on in the developing pancreases of fetal mice. These genes prompted the production of neurogenin-3 (Ngn3), a protein that le Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Mid-stage Trial Of Vaccine To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Fda Approves Mid-stage Trial Of Vaccine To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes researchers are hoping that an almost century-old vaccine for preventing tuberculosis may also reverse type 1 diabetes. The FDA has approved a mid-stage trial to test the vaccine, called bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in 150 adults with advanced cases of the disease. The approval was announced Sunday at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association by Dr. Denise Faustman, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Immunobiology Laboratory in Boston and principal investigator of the study. According to the American Diabetes Association, 5 percent of people with diabetes - or roughly three million individuals - have type 1, in which the immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Faustman told Reuters Health that the BCG vaccine temporarily raises levels of a substance called tumor necrosis factor, or TNF – and the higher TNF levels can eliminate the damaging T cells in the blood of individuals with type 1 diabetes. In a small preliminary trial, Faustman’s team found that two BCG injections given four weeks apart temporarily eliminated diabetes-causing T cells. Patients also showed evidence of small, temporary return of insulin secretion. This summer, she and her colleagues will begin enrolling patients ages 18 to 60 in a larger five-year trial. Participants will have low but detectable levels of insulin secretion from the pancreas. They'll receive two injections, four weeks apart, of either BCG or placebo, and then annual injections for the next four years. If this trial is successful, the next step would be an even larger study in a greater number of patients. "In the phase I (preliminary) trial we demonstrated a statistically significant response to BCG, but our goal in (this trial) is to create Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious, long-term medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children as obesity rates rise across all age groups. Several factors contribute to type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor. Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. But if treated carefully, it can be managed or even reversed. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin. This causes sugar to move from your blood to your cells, where it can be used as an energy source. As glucose levels in your blood go back down, your pancreas stops releasing insulin. Type 2 diabetes impacts how you metabolize sugar. Either your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body has become resistant to its effects. This causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. There are several symptoms of untreated type 2 diabetes, including: excessive thirst and urination fatigue increased hunger weight loss, in spite of eating more infections that heal slowly blurry vision dark patches on the skin Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes monitoring your blood sugar levels and using medications or insulin when needed. Doctors also recommend losing weight through diet and exercise. Some diabetes medications have weight loss as a side effect, which can also help reverse diabetes. If you start eating healthier, get more exercise, and lose weight, you can reduce your symptoms. Research shows that these lifestyle changes, especially physical activity, can even reverse the course of the condition. Studies that show the reversal of type 2 diabetes include participants who have lived with the condition for only a few years. Weight loss is the primary fact Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes: New Research From Boston Children’s Hospital

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes: New Research From Boston Children’s Hospital

Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital recently published the results of research that could ultimately lead to a cure for Type 1 diabetes. The strategy behind the study is based on the knowledge that Type 1 diabetes occurs when T-cells from the immune system attack beta cells in the pancreas — the cells that produce insulin. Previously, one method researchers have used in an attempt to neutralize this attack is to reboot a patient’s own immune system by infusing that patient with his or her own blood stem cells through what’s known as an autologous bone marrow transplant. The problem has been that the blood stem cells of people with diabetes tend to be defective, which can promote inflammation. Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital, however, said they found a way to fix the defect in the patient’s blood stem cells. They do this by treating the blood stem cells with small molecules or with gene therapy. The treatment stimulates the cells to produce more of a protein called PD-L1, which has a strong anti-inflammatory effect. Then, when they’re introduced into the pancreas, the treated cells bind to receptors on the T-cells. The T-cells either die or become inactive. According to Paolo Fiorina, MD, senior investigator on the study, “There’s really a reshaping of the immune system when you inject these cells.” Researchers tested the procedure on mice and reported they reversed Type 1 diabetes in the animals. All mice were cured of diabetes temporarily, and one-third of them were cured for the rest of their lives. The next step, of course, is to try the treatment on people with diabetes. Accordingly, Boston Children’s researchers are partnering with a California therapeutics firm to refine the procedure for modifying the blood stem cells and the Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Reversing diabetes is a term that usually refers to a significant long-term improvement in insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes that are able to get their HbA1c below 42 mmol/mol (6%) without taking diabetes medication are said to have reversed or resolved their diabetes. This also known as putting diabetes into remission. Loss of body weight can be particularly beneficial in helping to reverse the progression of diabetes. With time and dedication, type 2 diabetes can be reversed and the results can be very rewarding, with less tiredness and better all-round health. If you think you need to come off your diabetes medication, ensure you speak to your healthcare team before doing so. Understanding how diabetes progresses The most common cause of type 2 diabetes is obesity-related, which generally follows a vicious cycle pattern: Diet high in calories -particularly if high in refined carbohydrates. Insulin levels in the bloodstream rise to cope with the high- and quick-acting carb intake. Weight is gained around the belly (central or truncal obesity). Consistently high insulin levels lead to the body’s cells becoming resistant to insulin and commonly lead to weight gain. High insulin levels also increase weight gain. Insulin resistance leads to an increase in blood sugar levels, particularly after meals. The pancreas produces more insulin to cope with rising blood sugar levels. High sugar levels lead to feelings of lethargy and high insulin levels lead to increased hunger. Hunger often leads to overeating and lethargy, with less physical activity being taken. Overeating, less activity and high insulin levels all lead to further weight gain and more insulin resistance. Consistently high demand on the pancreas to produce ext Continue reading >>

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years now. The relentlessness of type 1, and the fact that I will probably live with this non-preventable condition for the rest of my life never goes away, but I have almost made peace with it. A few days ago, I saw something that gave me pause. “British man with type 1 diabetes to receive tests after coming off insulin,” read Diabetes.co.uk’s headline. The article goes onto say that, “Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again.” My first thoughts upon reading this were, “this can’t be true,” and “what’s the real explanation here?” There are many types of diabetes including type 2, LADA, and monogenic. Maybe he actually had one of those types instead of type 1. Usually, tests can determine this quickly though, so why was it not the case with Dan? I live in the UK and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. I managed to get in touch with ‘Miracle Dan’, as he’s been called by his friends. Although he is saving the specific details of his recent test results from the U.S. for an upcoming exclusive interview with another media outlet, he spoke to me and answered some of my questions about everything that has been happening. Please tell us a bit about yourself and your diabetes. When were you diagnosed? I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in February 2011 at the age of 23, after just leaving the army. I started a new engineering job and within two weeks of starting, I noticed the traditional symptoms of type 1 diabetes: thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, and a lot of vomiting. I collapsed and was taken by ambulance to hospital where I wa Continue reading >>

Turmeric Extract May Prevent, Even Reverse Diabetes (type 1 And 2)

Turmeric Extract May Prevent, Even Reverse Diabetes (type 1 And 2)

Leave your drugs in the chemist's pot if you can cure the patient with food." -Hippocrates, 420 BC Slowly but surely the world is waking up to the reality that diabetes is not only a preventable but a reversible condition, and that the drug-based model of symptom suppression and disease management has fatal flaws. For instance, some of the drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes actually increase the risk of death, with a recent study showing GMO insulin given to type 2 diabetics may lead to the development of so-called "double diabetes": type 2 and type 1 diabetes, together. Clearly, if medicine can't at least abide by its founding principle to "do no harm," it must seek the answer somewhere other than from the "chemist's pot." As the pharmaceutically-driven medical paradigm continues to lose adherents by the droves, and the public seeks a system that identifies and resolves the root causes of disease, interest is growing in the use of natural substances and lifestyle modifications to prevent and treat blood sugar disorders. And unlike a few decades ago, where most of the evidence for "natural healing" was anecdotal, there are now thousands of studies on hundreds of natural substances and therapeutic activities that may ameliorate blood sugar disorders and their complications. You can check out a good portion of the relevant research on the topic on GreenMedInfo.com's blood sugar disorder database. While plants like cinnamon and gymnema sylvestre have received plenty of attention for diabetes over the years, one special plant extract that is beginning to stand out from the crowd as being exceptionally valuable as an anti-diabetic agent is turmeric. There are, in fact, 21 articles on turmeric's value in type 2 diabetes on our database alone. Turmeric's primary polyphenol cu Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Periodic fasting has long been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on autoimmune disorders, cancer prevention and treatments, cardiovascular disease, and a myriad of other ailments. This most recent paper by Cheng et al. might add the treatment of Type 1 diabetes to that list[1]. If successful in humans, it has the potential to reverse some or most of the loss of insulin-producing cells within the pancreas. Just as remarkable, the treatment itself is relatively straightforward, consisting of a regimented protocol of periodic fasting-like conditions. Generally speaking, Type 1 diabetes results from an autoimmune mediated depletion of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta islet cells. In contrast, Type 2 results from lower cellular sensitivity to insulin. Type 2 is primarily caused by environmental factors such as poor diet. The current medical approach to treating Type 1 diabetes is the periodic administration of insulin, usually through self-administered injections. Most new therapies focused on curing Type 1 diabetes are looking to repopulating beta islet cells through the use of reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, these approaches are not as simple as the method demonstrated by Cheng et al in this recent study. The treatment consists of a “fasting mimicking diet” (FMD), which for mice corresponds to 3-4 day cycles of a high-fat and low-calorie diet, maintained for at least a month, followed by refeeding. This was performed on transgenic diabetic mice and also normal mice that had their beta cells depleted through the administration of high doses of a toxic drug. Results were also repeated using human diabetic primary beta cells in culture. In this case, the treatment consisted of the addition of human serum from individuals undergoing FMD. Continue reading >>

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Image Point Fr/Shutterstock A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes means a lifetime of constant diligence. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 usually develops early in life. Those diagnosed have to check blood sugar several times a day and take insulin as needed; the process is difficult, expensive, and potentially dangerous. That helps explain the excitement about a potential cure for type 1 diabetes using an already approved treatment. Doctors diagnose more than 18,000 children and teens with type 1 diabetes every year, according to the CDC. These kids lack the ability to make enough insulin, the hormone that processes blood sugar. Using insulin injections to control blood sugar with insulin is tricky because diet, exercise, and stress can quickly alter levels. Without enough insulin, kidney, heart, and nerve damage can be the result. Get too much, and blood sugar levels will plummet dangerously low. (This is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes.) Researchers in Israel have tried treating type 1 diabetics with an immune system protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha-1)—it helps target germs. Normally, insulin gets lower and lower over time in diabetics, but extra alpha-1 seems to help the body produce more. Researchers gave 12 recently diagnosed type 1 diabetics an alpha-1 drip once a week for eight weeks in a study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. For a year and counting following treatment, two of the participants have been making more of their own insulin. Another three saw only minor decreases—which is a good sign. “Compared to the natural course of the disease, which is downhill, even a flat line is considered success,” says study co-author Eli C. Lewis, PhD, biochemical and pharmacology professor at Ben-Gurion University of the N Continue reading >>

Scientists May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Scientists May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Unlike type-2 diabetes, which is a primarily a lifestyle disorder, type-1 diabetes is a disease you inherit at birth and have to deal with diligently throughout your life. People diagnosed with this disorder are burdened with the task of checking their blood sugar levels every day and take in insulin through the day; making this an arduous and expensive task. The Indian Journal of Endocrinol Metabolism claims that India houses around 97,000 children with type-1 diabetes. It comes as no surprise then that any news about a potential cure to tackle this crippling disease creates a lot of excitement. Researchers in Israel recently attempted treating people with type-1 diabetes with an immune system protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha-1), which helps the body produce more insulin. The report was published in Reader’s Digest. A study published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism stated that the researchers gave 12 recently diagnosed type-1 diabetics a drip of the protein alpha-1 once a week for a total of eight weeks. After a year of treatment two of the participants have started to make their own insulin, while three other have seen minor improvements. These results are a great sign since the disease is typically degenerative and even being able to sustain a flat line is considered as successful, states the co-author of the study Eli C. Lewis, PhD, biochemical and pharmacology professor at the Ben-Gurion University of Negev. Another small published previously in the journal Pediatric Diabetes revealed that 18 alpha-1 treatments could decrease the haemoglobin A1c in participants, which is a measure of their blood sugar over time and is used for treating insulin levels. Their levels dropped from 8.43 to 7.09 percent. With the target set at 7 percent o Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

More in diabetes