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Resveratrol Diabetes Type 2

Could Resveratrol Be A New Treatment For Diabetes?

Could Resveratrol Be A New Treatment For Diabetes?

A review determines whether resveratrol reduces fasting glucose and insulin levels and improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in the skins of red grapes, is a potent antioxidant that is being touted for its anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-aging, and cardioprotective effects. Some studies have shown that resveratrol intake improves insulin sensitivity in diabetic rats and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).1-3 However, studies with resveratrol have been inconsistent with a few randomized control trials showing that it was not an effective glycemic control agent.4,5 A new review attempted to resolve these contradictions by examining the data from the randomized control trials carried out in the past. The results of this analysis were published recently in Nutrition and Metabolism.6 Nine randomized clinical trials involving a total of 283 participants with T2DM were included in the analysis. While all studies monitored fasting plasma glucose, some also monitored glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin resistance. They also monitored systolic and diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and insulin concentrations. The daily dose of resveratrol in these studies ranged from 8 milligrams to 3000 milligrams taken over a period that varied from four weeks to 12 months. The data from these studies were pooled together and statistically analyzed. The results show that resveratrol significantly reduced fasting plasma glucose levels in patients with T2DM compared to the control group. Fasting plasma glucose levels were reduced significantly in patients who received high doses of resveratrol but did not decline in those who received low Continue reading >>

Resveratrol Shown To Reduce Risk Of Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes

Resveratrol Shown To Reduce Risk Of Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes

Home Type 2 Diabetes News and Research Resveratrol shown to reduce risk of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes The antioxidant resveratrol, which is commonly found in red wine and grapes, may significantly reduce an individual's chances of developing metabolic syndrome, a collection of cardio-metabolic risk factors that often leads to type 2 diabetes , according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Alberta tested the effectiveness of the antioxidant in a group of low-birth weight lab mice. These rodents frequently put on weight rapidly after birth in order to catch up to a normal developmental stage. However, this can cause metabolic changes that may predispose them to type 2 diabetes. The same effect happens in human babies. The researchers reported in the journal Diabetes that low-birth weight baby mice fed diets rich in resveratrol were significantly less likely to develop metabolic syndrome, a condition marked by insulin resistance, high blood pressure and cholesterol and excess belly fat. The condition is a well known risk factor for type 2 diabetes. You may be interested in these related articles: Continue reading >>

Effect Of Resveratrol On Glucose Control And Insulin Sensitivity: A Meta-analysis Of 11 Randomized Controlled Trials

Effect Of Resveratrol On Glucose Control And Insulin Sensitivity: A Meta-analysis Of 11 Randomized Controlled Trials

Effect of resveratrol on glucose control and insulin sensitivity: a meta-analysis of 11 randomized controlled trials From the Research Center for Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chongqing Medical Nutrition Research Center, Chongqing, PR China, Search for other works by this author on: From the Research Center for Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chongqing Medical Nutrition Research Center, Chongqing, PR China, Search for other works by this author on: From the Research Center for Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chongqing Medical Nutrition Research Center, Chongqing, PR China, Address correspondence to M-T Mi or B Wang, Research Center for Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chongqing Medical Nutrition Research Center, Chongqing 400038, PR China. E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Research Center for Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chongqing Medical Nutrition Research Center, Chongqing, PR China, Search for other works by this author on: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 99, Issue 6, 1 June 2014, Pages 15101519, Kai Liu, Rui Zhou, Bin Wang, Man-Tian Mi; Ef Continue reading >>

Can Wine Treat Diabetes?

Can Wine Treat Diabetes?

Red wine, you do more than make us feel fine: In addition to helping protect our tickers, the skin of red grapes—specifically the natural chemical compound resveratrol—may actually help diabetics regulate their blood sugar, according to new research in the journal Nutrition Research. Researchers in India recruited 62 people being treated for Type 2 diabetes, and gave half of them a 250-milligram resveratrol supplement once a day for three months. The results? Those who took the supplement had lower blood glucose levels than those who didn’t. Plus, the resveratrol-takers also had significant decreases in total cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. More from Prevention.com: 12 Ways To Never Get Diabetes Why? The reason isn’t clear, but the researchers say resveratrol may help stimulate insulin secretion or activate a protein that helps regulate glucose and insulin sensitivity. (Learn more about the wonders of red wine with It’s The Red, Not The Wine.) While the results certainly sound promising, don’t run out and buy a supplement just yet, says Rita Kalyani, MD, an endocrinologist and diabetes researcher at John Hopkins. More research needs to be done before doctors would consider recommending it, she says. And hitting up the liquor store in the hopes that red wine can control your blood sugar isn’t a good bet either: Red wine only contains up to 14 milligrams of resveratrol per liter, while study participants consumed 250 milligrams a day via a supplement. “You would need to drink a case of red wine or eat bushels of grapes, and at that point, the negative effects of consuming such large amounts of alcohol or sugar would outweigh any potential benefit,” says Ava Port, MD, an endocrinologist and diabetes researcher at the University of Maryland. Botto Continue reading >>

Resveratrol Reconsidered

Resveratrol Reconsidered

As we pointed out last week here at Diabetes Flashpoints, red wine has long been associated with a number of health benefits — including reduced insulin resistance and a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes — along with the risks inherent in drinking alcohol (which can include addiction and abuse, as well as higher blood triglyceride levels in some people). But the main study we discussed in last week’s post, published earlier this month by the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, found no reduction in overall mortality, or any other health benefits, from consuming higher levels of resveratrol — a compound in red wine that, in the context of the study, was a good marker for how much red wine the participants were drinking over the nine-year study period. This study cast doubt on the benefits of drinking red wine and, in particular, of consuming resveratrol, which is touted by some proponents as a wondrous health-enhancing, life-extending chemical. But another new study, also published earlier this month, takes a very different perspective on resveratrol. This research review, published in the journal European Endocrinology, notes that resveratrol may have several beneficial effects in people with Type 2 diabetes, including enhancing the effect of the oral drug metformin. According to an article on the review at NutraIngredients.com, a series of clinical trials at New York City’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine between 2005 and 2014 examined some of the diabetes-related effects of the chemical. In one study, a daily 500-milligram dose of resveratrol (in pill form) was found to slow the progression of prediabetes into full-blown Type 2 diabetes. Another study found that taking 1–2 grams of resveratrol daily improved glucose metabolism. In people with Type 2 Continue reading >>

Two Compounds Target The Gut To Lower Blood Sugar In Obese Or Diabetic Rats

Two Compounds Target The Gut To Lower Blood Sugar In Obese Or Diabetic Rats

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Two compounds target the gut to lower blood sugar in obese or diabetic rats Metformin (the most widely prescribed type 2 diabetic medication) and resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, trigger novel signaling pathways in the small intestine to lower blood sugar, research demonstrates. Researchers at the Toronto General Hospital Research Institute have discovered metformin (the most widely prescribed type 2 diabetic medication) and resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, trigger novel signaling pathways in the small intestine to lower blood sugar. The team, led by Dr. Tony Lam and his Banting fellow Dr. Frank Duca, graduate student Clemence Cote, and Vanier Scholar Brittany Rasmussen used obese and diabetic rat models to discover that metformin and resveratrol respectively activate molecules known as AMPK and sirtuin 1 in the small intestine and trigger a neuronal network involving the gut, brain and liver to lower blood sugar. The findings were published as two back-to-back papers as advance on-line April 6, 2015 publications in the international medical journal Nature Medicine entitled, "Metformin activates duodenal AMPK and a neuronal network to lower glucose production" and "Resveratrol activates duodenal Sirt1 to reverse insulin resistance in rats through a neuronal network." One compound studied is the commonly-used drug metformin for patients with Type 2 diabetes, and the other is resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, grapes, peanuts and blueberries. Although research on resveratrol in cell culture and animal studies has shown promising effects on inhibiting cancer cells, anti-inflammation capabilities and decreases in glucose or blood sugar levels, the compound's effects on Continue reading >>

Resveratrol: A Miracle Molecule?

Resveratrol: A Miracle Molecule?

A glass of fine red wine can elevate a good meal to a fantastic one or help unclench the mind after a difficult day. Yet some scientists believe those salubrious effects of le vin rouge pale next to what one of its ingredients may someday do. Perched upon that wineglass stem, masked in crimson, is a molecule that may hold enormous potential for human health: resveratrol. The substance that has become synonymous with red wine's health benefits was actually first isolated from the roots of white hellebore, a flowering plant, in 1940. But resveratrol got scant attention until 1992, when researchers found an abundance of it in red wine and postulated that resveratrol might explain what's known as the "French paradox." The paradox is this: France is saturated, so to speak, with foods rich in unhealthy fatscheeses, cream sauces, foie gras, and the ubiquitous croque-monsieur, a gooey grilled ham-and-cheese sandwich. Yet the French have a surprisingly low rate of heart attack and stroke (although some researchers argue the numbers have been underestimated). And what do the French wash all that fatty deliciousness down with? That's right: red wine. The thinking goes that perhaps it's the resveratrol in the wine that keeps the French healthy in spite of a well-larded diet. Even if the French paradox is eventually disproven, resveratrol research is showing promise. Some data suggest that resveratrol may keep blood from clotting, much like aspirin. There is also evidence that it relaxes blood vessels, exerts an antioxidant effect, and keeps cholesterol and triglycerides from forming the arterial lesions that can cause heart attacks and strokes. What's more, resveratrol has the potential to help more than just the heart, it seems. One of the most exciting areas of research is cance Continue reading >>

Resveratrol Shows Potential For Blood Sugar Control: Human Data

Resveratrol Shows Potential For Blood Sugar Control: Human Data

Resveratrol shows potential for blood sugar control: Human data Three months of consuming a daily supplement of resveratrol may help with blood sugar control and improve blood pressure in type-2 diabetics, suggests data from India. Improvements in Hemoglobin A1C, a marker of the long-term presence of excess glucose in the blood, were observed following three months of supplementation with 250 milligrams per day of resveratrol (Biofort, Biotivia Bioceuticals International) in combination with oral hypoglycemic agents. The results of the present study support our hypothesis that resveratrol supplementation improves glycemic control and the associated risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, wrote researchers in Nutrition Research . The study also suggests that resveratrol could be used as an effective adjuvant therapy with a conventional hypoglycemic regimen to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Resveratrol, a powerful polyphenol and anti-fungal chemical, is often touted as the bioactive compound in grapes and red wine, and has particularly been associated with the so-called 'French Paradox'. The phrase, coined in 1992 by Dr Serge Renaud from Bordeaux University, describes the low incidence of heart disease and obesity among the French, despite their relatively high-fat diet and levels of wine consumption. Other studies with only resveratrol have reported anti-cancer effects, anti-inflammatory effects, cardiovascular benefits, anti-diabetes potential, energy endurance enhancement, and protection against Alzheimers. The researchers, led by Moola Joghee Nanjan from the JSS College of Pharmacy in Tamilnadu, India, sought to test their hypothesis that oral supplementation of resveratrol could improve the glycemic control in type-2 diabetics. Sixty-two people were Continue reading >>

Resveratrol Type 2 Diabetes Potential

Resveratrol Type 2 Diabetes Potential

Supplemental resveratrol should be considered as an adjunct to standard anti-diabetic agents inthe treatment of type 2 diabetes, according to two studies conducted at the University of Medical Sciences in Iran and JSS University in India. Resveratrol is a polyphenol and anti-fungal antioxidant most typically sourced from grapes and red wine. 57 participants with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were given either oral hypoglycemic agents in the control group or resveratrol (250mg/day) and oral hypoglycemic agents in the intervention group over a period of six months. Our central findings are that oral supplementation of resveratrol along with antidiabetic agents is effective in improving vascular risk factors, namely body weight, oxidative stress and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic patients,professor Moola Joghee Nanjan told NutraIngredients. The practical implications of these findings arethat type 2 diabetic patients are known to be more sensitive to the deterioration in their quality of life because of the chronic disease, relatedcomplications, alternative treatment, diet restriction and lifelong treatment with tablets or insulin. Supplementation of resveratrol is expected to improve their quality of life." Existing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) treatments limit their use because of side effects like weight gain, hypoglycaemia and contraindications. Furthermore, current anti-diabetic treatments do not have any significant impact on associated risk factors, claim the JSS University researchers. There is a need, therefore, for new therapies that may improve not only hyperglycaemic effect but also the associated problems, the researchers wrote.Resveratrol could, therefore, be used as an effective adjuvant therapy with conventional hyperglycemic regimen for the management of diabetes. T Continue reading >>

High-doses Of Resveratrol Provide No Metabolic Benefit To Obese Men

High-doses Of Resveratrol Provide No Metabolic Benefit To Obese Men

High-Doses of Resveratrol Provide No Metabolic Benefit to Obese Men Taking high-dose supplements of resveratrol, a compound found in small amounts in red wine, provided no significant health benefit to obese but otherwise healthy men, according to a study published online November 28th in the journal Diabetes. Previous animal and in vitro studies have suggested that taking resvertrol supplements in high doses can protect against morbidity and premature mortality for those with obesity, diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia. This randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind study was one of the first to examine the effects of resveratrol on humans. In this trial, 24 obese but otherwise healthy men took daily doses of 1500 mg of resveratrol or placebo over a period of four-weeks. Researchers found no significant changes in insulin sensitivity, the main focus of the study. They also found no impact on blood pressure, metabolic rate, levels of triglycerides and fats or any other metabolic biomarkers. While there has been a suggestion that resveratrol could offer some protection from diabetes or heart disease, this study clearly contradicts what we have seen in previous research involving laboratory animals, said lead researcher Morten Moller Poulsen, MD. It seriously calls into question whether there is any benefit associated with taking supplements made from this compound. In healthy obese subjects, our results would suggest there is not. The researchers note, however, that future studies should test the therapeutic potential of resveratrol on subjects who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease to determine if it might be more beneficial for people who are less healthy. To contact lead researcher Morten Molle Continue reading >>

Effects Of Resveratrol On Glucose Control And Insulin Sensitivity In Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Effects Of Resveratrol On Glucose Control And Insulin Sensitivity In Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Effects of resveratrol on glucose control and insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis Although the regular consumption of resveratrol has been known to improve glucose homeostasis and reverse insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the reported results are inconsistent. Thus, we aimed to assess the effects of resveratrol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity among patients with T2DM. We searched for relevant articles published until June 2017 on PubMed-Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Randomized controlled trials in T2DM patients administered with resveratrol as intervention were included. After study selection, quality assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two authors, and STATA and RevMan software were used for statistical analysis. Nine randomized controlled trials involving 283 participants were included. Meta-analysis showed that resveratrol significantly improved the fasting plasma glucose ( 0.29 mmol/l, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.06, p < 0.01) and insulin levels (0.64 U/mL, 95% CI: 0.95, 0.32, p < 0.0001). The drug also reduced homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure among participants with T2DM. The changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were negligible. Subgroup analysis comparing the resveratrol supplementation doses of < 100 mg/d versus 100 mg/d revealed a significant difference in fasting plasma glucose. In particular, the latter dose presented more favorable results. This meta-analysis provides evidence that supplementation of resveratrol may benefit management of T2DM. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2 Continue reading >>

Resveratrol And Type 2 Diabetes

Resveratrol And Type 2 Diabetes

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01638780 Verified September 2014 by Maastricht University Medical Center. Recruitment status was: Active, not recruiting Information provided by (Responsible Party): Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information The main objective of the study is to investigate if resveratrol supplementation can improve overall and muscle-specific insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic patients. As a secondary objective the investigators want to investigate whether the improved insulin sensitivity can be attributed to improved muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity and a reduced intrahepatic and cardiac lipid content. Dietary Supplement: placebo Dietary Supplement: resveratrol Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor) Effect of Resveratrol on Insulin Sensitivity and Metabolic Profile in Type 2 Diabetics A placebo will be given for 30 days, twice daily. One pill will be provided with lunch and the other pill will be provided with dinner. A placebo will given for 30 days, twice daily. One pill will be provided with lunch, and the other pill will be provided with dinner. resveratrol will be given for 30 days, twice daily. One pill, which contains 75 mg of resveratrol, will be provided with lunch, and the other pill of 75 mg will be provided with dinner. So in total 150 mg/day of resveratrol will be given. Continue reading >>

Resveratrol In Diabetes Care

Resveratrol In Diabetes Care

Movahed A, Nabipour I, Lieben Louis X, et al. Antihyperglycemic effects of short term resveratrol supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013;2013:851267. Using a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, this study examined the effects of resveratrol in lowering blood glucose and other related outcomes (eg, insulin, metabolic markers, cardiovascular risk factors) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants The participants were 66 subjects (33 females, 33 males) with type 2 diabetes (mean age=52.13 years). Two participants dropped out of the study. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 500 mg twice a day (a total of 1g/d) of resveratrol (n=33) or placebo tablets (n=31) for 45 days. Since the study was also intended to test the effectiveness of resveratrol when administered in conjunction with existing treatments against type 2 diabetes, all patients were allowed to continue with their antidiabetic medication. Study Parameter Assessed The assessments were taken at baseline and after 45 days of either resveratrol or placebo supplementation. Primary Outcome Measures The outcomes assessed were body weight, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, haemoglobin A1c, insulin, homeostatic assessments for insulin resistance, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and markers of liver and kidney damage. Compared to baseline values, resveratrol treatment significantly decreased systolic blood pressure (129.03 ± 14.91 vs 121.45± 10.26; P<0.0001), fasting blood glucose (175.74 ± 49.63 vs 140.80 ± 39.74; P<-0.0001), hemoglobin A1c (8.6 ± 1.390 vs 7.60 ± 1.32; P<0.0001), insulin (10.20 ± 4.33 vs 5.37 ± 2.62; P<0.0001), and insulin resistance as measured by Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Resveratrol On Markers Of Oxidative Stress In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial

The Effects Of Resveratrol On Markers Of Oxidative Stress In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial

, Volume 55, Issue4 , pp 341353 | Cite as The effects of resveratrol on markers of oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In vitro and animal studies have shown that resveratrol exerts an antioxidant effect, but clinical trials addressing this effect in patients with T2D are limited. The aim of this study was to determine whether resveratrol supplementation affects oxidative stress markers in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial. A total of 48 patients with T2D randomly were assigned to receive 800mg/day resveratrol or placebo for 2months. Plasma total antioxidant capacity, malondialdehyde concentration, protein carbonyl and total thiol contents, intracellular superoxide anion (O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in PBMCs, the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress responses (Nrf2, SOD, Cat, HO-1, RAGE, NOS) in PBMCs, and metabolic and anthropometric parameters were measured at the baseline and at the trial end. Compared with the placebo group, resveratrol reduced plasma protein carbonyl content and PBMCs O2 level and significantly increased plasma total antioxidant capacity and total thiol content. Furthermore, the expression of Nrf2 and SOD was significantly increased after resveratrol consumption. Resveratrol had no significant effects on the metabolic and anthropometric parameters except for a significant reduction in weight, BMI, and blood pressure levels. Resveratrol was well tolerated, and no serious adverse event was occurred. Our study demonstrated that 8weeks of supplementation with 800mg/day resveratrol has an antioxidant effect in the blood and PBMCs of patients with T2D Continue reading >>

Is Resveratrol Safe If You Have Diabetes?

Is Resveratrol Safe If You Have Diabetes?

So many medications and supplements on the market to help with glucose control of diabetes…. What do you do? What is reliable information, proven with scientific clinical studies? What is just bunk that is hyped up on the internet? Resveratrol is not a formal, regulated, prescribed medication. It is a dietary supplement, a polyphenol compound, originating from the skin of red grapes. In addition to red grape skin or extract, resveratrol supplements contain extracts from the Japanese and Chinese knotweed plant Polygonum cuspidatum. Certain red wine varieties contain more resveratrol than others. For example, pinot noir and merlot contain more per 5-ounce glass than cabernet sauvignon (0.5 mg versus 0.2 mg). Interestingly, resveratrol is also found in peanuts and some berries. The amount of resveratrol in foods and wine is dramatically less than the amount in over-the-counter supplements (1-500 mg). The Claims The claims are infinite – from weight loss to longer, healthier lifespan, and pretty much everything in between. Claims surround the prevention and treatment of cancers, cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases. The primary health claims related to diabetes of resveratrol supplementation encompass improved glycemic control and prevent insulin resistance. Keep in mind, that preventing insulin resistance is akin to preventing diabetes from developing…. Not necessarily treating diabetes. The antioxidant molecules in resveratrol (3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene) belong to a class of polyphenols called stilbenes. Resveratrol began increasing in popularity in the 1990’s when it was found that red wine was associated with lower prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and cancers, specifically in relation to the “French Paradox.” The French Paradox is a c Continue reading >>

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