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Resveratrol Diabetes 2016

The Role Of Resveratrol In Slowing Down Alzheimer's Disease

The Role Of Resveratrol In Slowing Down Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimers disease currently hits someone in the U.S. every 66 seconds and affects 5 million Americans annually In testing high doses of resveratrol, scientists found individuals with mild Alzheimers were experiencing brain shrinkage until they found a certain molecule that may be responsible for decreasing brain inflammation Resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, raspberries and chocolate, appears to slow the encroachment of cognitive problems in Alzheimers patients by repairing leaky blood-brain barriers and stabilizing mitochondrial function What do pomegranates, grape skin and raw cacao have in common? If your first thought was that they're all plant-based foods, you'd be right, but if you also knew they all contain a powerful antioxidant called resveratrol, you'd get a gold star! Resveratrol is a polyphenol released by plants to help them resist damage from things like bacteria, excess ultraviolet light or injury, say, by aphids or other microorganisms. The amazing thing is when you eat foods containing this compound, you, too, may experience similar benefits. Resveratrol has been the object of scrutiny by scientists all over the world in relation to its effect on Alzheimer's disease , which currently hits someone in the U.S. every 66 seconds and affects 5 million Americans annually. 1 Alzheimer's Disease Is on the Rise in the US Most people know Alzheimer's as a disease that causes memory loss. In its earliest stages, it manifests itself in small ways, such as forgetting important dates or where things are; later, checkbook balancing becomes an increasingly frustrating challenge. More progressed Alzheimer's patients confuse what day it is and where they are, and find words and distances difficult to discern. Following a conversation may become difficult for t Continue reading >>

Application Of Resveratrol In Diabetes: Rationale, Strategies And Challenges

Application Of Resveratrol In Diabetes: Rationale, Strategies And Challenges

Translational Health Science and Technology Institute The increasing prevalence, involvement of several signaling pathways, variable pathogenesis, progressive natural history and complications of type 2 diabetes emphasize an urgent need for a molecule with multiple actions. Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a polyphenolic antioxidant present in red wine gaining a worldwide interest because of its multi-target effect against diabetes and other life-threatening diseases. Improving insulin sensitivity, enhancing GLUT4 translocation, reducing oxidative stress, regulating carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes, activating SIRT1 and AMPK, and decreasing adipogenic genes are some promising mechanisms established until now for resveratrol. Apart from these, resveratrol attenuates the end organ damage and reduced diabetic complications. Resveratrol exerts its beneficial antidiabetic action as evidenced from the in-vitro, preclinical and clinical studies. Considering all the benefits of resveratrol in diabetes, resveratrol based different nutraceutical products have been developed commercially to use in humans. However, this compound is still under investigation because of some limitations. Resveratrol can be taken in to account in the treatment of diabetes after overcoming all hurdles and difficulties. This article examines the basic scientific evidences, animal experiments, and human /clinical data supporting the antidiabetic action of resveratrol and describes the strategies and challenges to recommend resveratrol from preclinical to clinical use. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Continue reading >>

Resveratrol: How Much Wine Do You Have To Drink To Stay Healthy?

Resveratrol: How Much Wine Do You Have To Drink To Stay Healthy?

Resveratrol is a naturally occurring stilbene endowed with multiple health-promoting effects. It is produced by certain plants including several dietary sources such as grapes, apples, raspberries, blueberries, plums, peanuts, and products derived therefrom (e.g., wine). Resveratrol can be isolated and purified from these biological sources or synthesized in a few steps with an overall high yield. This compound and its glucoside, the trans-polydatin piceid, have received worldwide attention for their beneficial effects on cardiovascular, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, metabolic, and age-related diseases. These health-promoting effects are particularly attractive given the prevalence of resveratrol-based nutraceuticals and the paradoxical epidemiologic observation that wine consumption is inversely correlated to the incidence of coronary heart disease. However, the notion of resveratrol as a magic bullet was recently challenged by clinical trials showing that this polyphenol does not have a substantial influence on health status and mortality risk. In the present review, we discuss the proposed therapeutic attributes and the mode of molecular actions of resveratrol. We also cover recent pharmacologic efforts to improve the poor bioavailability of resveratrol and influence the transition between body systems in humans. We conclude with some thoughts about future research directions that might be meaningful for resolving controversies surrounding resveratrol. French paradox , therapy , human trials , liver , SIRT1 , pharmacology , nanotechnology Resveratrol is a naturally occurring phytoalexin that is produced by several plants in response to injury. It exerts multiple biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antioxidant effects ( 1 ). Continue reading >>

Resveratrol For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Resveratrol For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Resveratrol for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus University of Manitoba, Centre for Healthcare Innovation, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Maya M Jeyaraman, Centre for Healthcare Innovation, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3A 1R9, Canada. [email protected] . [email protected] . University of Manitoba and CancerCare Manitoba, Internal Medicine, Sections of Hematology and Critical Care, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Cited by (CrossRef): 0 articles Check for updates This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the efficacy and safety of resveratrol in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic condition characterized by insulin resistance. There is an initial early compensatory increase in insulin levels, but in the later stage, beta-cell failure leads to decreased insulin secretion ( Martin-Gronert 2012 ). More than 366 million people worldwide are diabetic and this number is predicted to nearly double by 2030 ( Moser 2012 ). Prevalence continues to increase at an alarming rate, especially in low- and middle-income countries ( Moser 2012 ). T2DM is the fourth leading cause of death in developed nations, with a two-fold excess risk of mortality and a two- to four-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease ( McKinlay 2000 ). Macrovascular complications of T2DM include coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke, while microvascular complications include diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy ( Hemmingsen 2013 ). Management of T2DM has traditionally been approached in a stepwise manner, starting with 'lifestyle' modifications, exercise and, if still uncontrolled, pharmacotherapy with oral antidiabetic drugs and insulin ( Bird 2012 ; El-Kai Continue reading >>

Is Resveratrol Safe If You Have Diabetes?

Is Resveratrol Safe If You Have Diabetes?

So many medications and supplements on the market to help with glucose control of diabetes…. What do you do? What is reliable information, proven with scientific clinical studies? What is just bunk that is hyped up on the internet? Resveratrol is not a formal, regulated, prescribed medication. It is a dietary supplement, a polyphenol compound, originating from the skin of red grapes. In addition to red grape skin or extract, resveratrol supplements contain extracts from the Japanese and Chinese knotweed plant Polygonum cuspidatum. Certain red wine varieties contain more resveratrol than others. For example, pinot noir and merlot contain more per 5-ounce glass than cabernet sauvignon (0.5 mg versus 0.2 mg). Interestingly, resveratrol is also found in peanuts and some berries. The amount of resveratrol in foods and wine is dramatically less than the amount in over-the-counter supplements (1-500 mg). The Claims The claims are infinite – from weight loss to longer, healthier lifespan, and pretty much everything in between. Claims surround the prevention and treatment of cancers, cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases. The primary health claims related to diabetes of resveratrol supplementation encompass improved glycemic control and prevent insulin resistance. Keep in mind, that preventing insulin resistance is akin to preventing diabetes from developing…. Not necessarily treating diabetes. The antioxidant molecules in resveratrol (3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene) belong to a class of polyphenols called stilbenes. Resveratrol began increasing in popularity in the 1990’s when it was found that red wine was associated with lower prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and cancers, specifically in relation to the “French Paradox.” The French Paradox is a c Continue reading >>

Resveratrol Shows Neuronal And Vascular-protective Effects In Older, Obese, Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

Resveratrol Shows Neuronal And Vascular-protective Effects In Older, Obese, Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

Abstract Diabetes-induced CVD is the most significant complication of prolonged hyperglycaemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether resveratrol, a polyphenol antioxidant compound, when administered at a dose that can be reasonably obtained through supplementation could prevent the development of cardiovascular complications in older, obese, diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in 6-month old, obese, male Wistar rats via a single intravenous dose of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg). Randomly selected animals were administered resveratrol (2 mg/kg) via oral gavage daily for 8 weeks. Body weights, blood glucose levels, food intake and water consumption were monitored, and assessments of vascular reactivity, tactile allodynia and left ventricular function were performed. Resveratrol therapy significantly improved tactile allodynia and vascular contractile functionality in diabetic rats (P<0·05). There were no significant changes in standardised vasorelaxation responses, plasma glucose concentrations, water consumption, body weight, left ventricular hypertrophy, kidney hypertrophy, heart rate or left ventricular compliance with resveratrol administration. Resveratrol-mediated improvements in vascular and nerve function in old, obese, diabetic rats were associated with its reported antioxidant effects. Resveratrol did not improve cardiac function nor mitigate the classic clinical symptoms of diabetes mellitus (i.e. hyperglycaemia, polydypsia and a failure to thrive). This suggests that supplementation with resveratrol at a dose achievable with commercially available supplements would not produce significant cardioprotective effects in people with diabetes mellitus. Continue reading >>

Resveratrol Improves Glycemic Control In Insulin-treated Diabetic Rats: Participation Of The Hepatic Territory

Resveratrol Improves Glycemic Control In Insulin-treated Diabetic Rats: Participation Of The Hepatic Territory

Resveratrol improves glycemic control in insulin-treated diabetic rats: participation of the hepatic territory Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol that has been proposed to improve glycemic control in diabetes, by mechanisms that involve improvement in insulin secretion and activity. In type 1 diabetes (T1D), in which insulin therapy is obligatory, resveratrol treatment has never been investigated. The present study aimed to evaluate resveratrol as an adjunctive agent to insulin therapy in a T1D-like experimental model. Rats were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment. Twenty days later, four groups of animals were studied: non-diabetic (ND); diabetic treated with placebo (DP); diabetic treated with insulin (DI) and diabetic treated with insulin plus resveratrol (DIR). After 30days of treatment, 24-hour urine was collected; then, blood, soleus muscle, proximal small intestine, renal cortex and liver were sampled. Specific glucose transporter proteins were analyzed (Western blotting) in each territory of interest. Solute carrier family 2 member 2 (Slc2a2), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1) and glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6pc) mRNAs (qPCR), glycogen storage and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activity were analyzed in liver. Diabetes induction increased blood glucose, plasma fructosamine concentrations, and glycosuria. Insulin therapy partially recovered the glycemic control; however, resveratrol as adjunctive therapy additionally improved glycemic control and restored plasma fructosamine concentration to values of non-diabetic rats. Resveratrol did not alter the expression of the glucose transporters GLUT2 and SGLT1 in the intestine, GLUT2 and SGLT2 in kidney and GLUT4 in soleus, suggesting that fluxes of glucose in these territories were unaltered. Continue reading >>

Resveratrol News, Research

Resveratrol News, Research

The high estrogen levels that typically afford younger women protection from cardiovascular disease appear to instead multiply their risk if they have type 1 diabetes, researchers say. According to a new study from the researchers at Harvard Medical School and the University of New South Wales, the actually cellular processes that cause aging of the blood vessels have been understood. Individual damaged nerve cells cause neurodegenerative diseases If the sense of smell disappears, this can indicate a disease such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. However, unlike previously assumed, general degenerations in the nervous system do not play a leading role in the loss of the sense of smell with increasing age, but individual nerve cells or classes of nerves are decisive. Novel grape-derived compounds could be developed as therapeutic agents for treatment of depression In a study to be published online February 2 in Nature Communications, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai describe an extensive analysis of novel grape-derived compounds, dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA) and malvidin-3'-O-glucoside (Mal-gluc),which might be developed as therapeutic agents for the treatment of depression. Defects in mitochondria, the tiny structures that power our cells by functioning as biological batteries, cause an array of complex, often life-threatening disorders that can affect any and all organs and systems. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 12,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year. As the brain has limited capability for self-repair or regeneration, stem cells may represent the best therapeutic approach for counteracting damage to or degeneration of brain tissue caused by injury, aging Continue reading >>

The Therapeutic Potential Of Resveratrol: A Review Of Clinical Trials

The Therapeutic Potential Of Resveratrol: A Review Of Clinical Trials

The therapeutic potential of resveratrol: a review of clinical trials npj Precision Oncologyvolume1, Articlenumber:35 (2017) Resveratrol is a nutraceutical with several therapeutic effects. It has been shown to mimic effects of caloric restriction, exert anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects, and affect the initiation and progression of many diseases through several mechanisms. While there is a wealth of in vitro and in vivo evidence that resveratrol could be a promising therapeutic agent, clinical trials must confirm its potential. In this work, we reviewed the current clinical data available regarding the pharmacological action of resveratrol. Most of the clinical trials of resveratrol have focused on cancer, neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and obesity. We found that for neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes, the current clinical trials show that resveratrol was well tolerated and beneficially influenced disease biomarkers. However resveratrol had ambiguous and sometimes even detrimental effects in certain types of cancers and in NAFLD. In most of the clinical trials, the major obstacle presented was resveratrols poor bioavailability. Thus, this work provides useful considerations for the planning and design of future pre-clinical and clinical research on resveratrol. Resveratrol (3,4,5- trihydroxystilbene) is a nutraceutical that has recently attracted a lot of research attention due to its exciting pharmacological potential. It is a phytoalexin found in many plants including grapes, peanuts, and berries. Resveratrol was first isolated in Veratrum grandiflorum, or white hellebore plant, in the 1940s. 1 Stilbene compounds are known for their ability to provide plants Continue reading >>

High-doses Of Resveratrol Provide No Metabolic Benefit To Obese Men

High-doses Of Resveratrol Provide No Metabolic Benefit To Obese Men

High-Doses of Resveratrol Provide No Metabolic Benefit to Obese Men Taking high-dose supplements of resveratrol, a compound found in small amounts in red wine, provided no significant health benefit to obese but otherwise healthy men, according to a study published online November 28th in the journal Diabetes. Previous animal and in vitro studies have suggested that taking resvertrol supplements in high doses can protect against morbidity and premature mortality for those with obesity, diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia. This randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind study was one of the first to examine the effects of resveratrol on humans. In this trial, 24 obese but otherwise healthy men took daily doses of 1500 mg of resveratrol or placebo over a period of four-weeks. Researchers found no significant changes in insulin sensitivity, the main focus of the study. They also found no impact on blood pressure, metabolic rate, levels of triglycerides and fats or any other metabolic biomarkers. While there has been a suggestion that resveratrol could offer some protection from diabetes or heart disease, this study clearly contradicts what we have seen in previous research involving laboratory animals, said lead researcher Morten Moller Poulsen, MD. It seriously calls into question whether there is any benefit associated with taking supplements made from this compound. In healthy obese subjects, our results would suggest there is not. The researchers note, however, that future studies should test the therapeutic potential of resveratrol on subjects who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease to determine if it might be more beneficial for people who are less healthy. To contact lead researcher Morten Molle Continue reading >>

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Acute Resveratrol Consumption Improves Neurovascular Coupling Capacity In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Acute Resveratrol Consumption Improves Neurovascular Coupling Capacity In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Nutrients 2016, 8(7), 425; Acute Resveratrol Consumption Improves Neurovascular Coupling Capacity in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., P.O. Box 2676, 4002 Basel, Switzerland Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Received: 20 May 2016 / Revised: 16 June 2016 / Accepted: 2 July 2016 / Published: 12 July 2016 Background: Poor cerebral perfusion may contribute to cognitive impairment in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We conducted a randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that resveratrol can enhance cerebral vasodilator function and thereby alleviate the cognitive deficits in T2DM. We have already reported that acute resveratrol consumption improved cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) to hypercapnia. We now report the effects of resveratrol on neurovascular coupling capacity (CVR to cognitive stimuli), cognitive performance and correlations with plasma resveratrol concentrations. Methods: Thirty-six T2DM adults aged 4080 years were randomized to consume single doses of resveratrol (0, 75, 150 and 300 mg) at weekly intervals. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to monitor changes in blood flow velocity (BFV) during a cognitive test battery. The battery consisted of dual-tasking (finger tapping with both Trail Making task and Serial Subtraction 3 task) and a computerized multi-tasking test that required attending to four tasks simultaneously. CVR to cognitive tasks was calculated as the per cent increase in BFV from pre-test basal to peak mean blood flow velocity and also as the area under the curve for BFV. Results: Compared to placebo, 75 mg resveratrol significantly improve Continue reading >>

Resveratrol As Add-on Therapy In Subjects With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Resveratrol As Add-on Therapy In Subjects With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Diabetes Care. 2016 Dec;39(12):2211-2217. Epub 2016 Oct 6. Resveratrol as Add-on Therapy in Subjects With Well-Controlled Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Department of Human Biology and Human Movement Sciences, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., Kaiseraugst, Switzerland. Department of Radiology, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands. Department of Human Biology and Human Movement Sciences, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands [email protected] To determine whether resveratrol supplementation can improve insulin sensitivity and promote overall metabolic health on top of standard diabetes care. Seventeen subjects with well-controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) were treated with placebo and 150 mg/day resveratrol (resVida) in a randomized double-blind crossover study for 30 days. The main outcome measure was insulin sensitivity by the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique. Hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were not affected by resveratrol treatment. Intrahepatic lipid content also remained unaffected by resveratrol; however, the change in intrahepatic lipid content correlated negatively with plasma resveratrol levels (R = -0.68, P = 0.03). Intramyocellular lipid content increased in type 2 muscle fibers (P = 0.03), and systolic blood pressure tended to decrease (P = 0.09) upon resveratrol treatment. In addition, resveratrol significantly improved ex vivo mitochondrial function (state 3 and state U respiration upon malate with octanoyl-c Continue reading >>

Dataset Of Trans-resveratrol On Diabetes-induced Abnormal Spermatogenesis, Poly (adp-ribose) Polymerase-1 (parp1) Expression In Intra-testicular Blood Vessels, And Stage-dependent Expression Of Parp1 And Sirtuin 1 In The Rat Testis.

Dataset Of Trans-resveratrol On Diabetes-induced Abnormal Spermatogenesis, Poly (adp-ribose) Polymerase-1 (parp1) Expression In Intra-testicular Blood Vessels, And Stage-dependent Expression Of Parp1 And Sirtuin 1 In The Rat Testis.

This article contains data related to the article "Effects of Trans-Resveratrol on hyperglycemia-induced abnormal spermatogenesis, DNA damage and alterations in poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase signaling in rat testis" (A. Abdelali, M. Al-Bader, N. Kilarkaje, 2016) [1]. The data are related to Resveratrol on diabetes-induced changes in blood glucose levels, body weights of rats, sperm count and motility, expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) in Leydig cells and in intratesticular blood vessels, and stage-dependent expression of PARP1 and Sirtuin 1 (SirT1) in the rat testis. In this experiment, the data were obtained from control, Resveratrol-treated, diabetic and Resveratrol-treated diabetic rats on day 42 after the induction of diabetes. Resveratrol treatment for a group each of normal and diabetic rats started on day 22 and extended up to day 42. The sperm parameters were conducted in samples obtained from the epididymis. The expression of proteins was evaluated by immunohistochemistry by using specific primary antibodies. The data are presented in the form of figures and significance of them has been given in the research article [1]. Continue reading >>

Effects Of Combined Resveratrol Plus Metformin Therapy In Db/db Diabetic Mice

Effects Of Combined Resveratrol Plus Metformin Therapy In Db/db Diabetic Mice

1CINDETEC A.C. Avenida Jurica, Industrial Park Querétaro, Querétaro, México 2Faculty of Pharmacy, Autonomous University of the State of Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México 3Nucitec, S. A. de C. V. Avenida Jurica, Industrial Park Querétaro, Querétaro, México Citation: Ángel DVM, Antonieta GSM, Rocio GC, Jorge RE, Rosado JL, et al. (2016) Effects of Combined Resveratrol Plus Metformin Therapy in db/db Diabetic Mice. J Metabolic Synd 5: 217. doi: 10.4172/2167-0943.1000217 Copyright: ©2016 Ángel DVM, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Metabolic Syndrome Abstract Background: The worldwide prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with other conditions that trigger metabolic syndrome. Although several studies on the benefits of resveratrol have been carried out, few have assessed this drug in combination with metformin. Objectives: This study looks at the effects that combined metformin/resveratrol therapy has on body weight gain and liver and renal damage of db/db diabetic mice. It also addresses biochemical findings. Method: Diabetic mice were treated with resveratrol (20 mg/kg/day), metformin (150 mg/kg/day) and combined metformin/resveratrol therapy for 5 weeks. Histopathological tissue analyses and biochemical parameters (glucose, insulin, triglycerides and cholesterol), functional liver enzymes (AP, AST and GGT) and renal parameters (urea and uric acid) were examined. Results: Our data clearly showed that combined metformin/resveratrol treatment reduced obesity, glucose and triglyceride levels, as w Continue reading >>

Could Resveratrol Be A New Treatment For Diabetes?

Could Resveratrol Be A New Treatment For Diabetes?

A review determines whether resveratrol reduces fasting glucose and insulin levels and improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in the skins of red grapes, is a potent antioxidant that is being touted for its anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-aging, and cardioprotective effects. Some studies have shown that resveratrol intake improves insulin sensitivity in diabetic rats and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).1-3 However, studies with resveratrol have been inconsistent with a few randomized control trials showing that it was not an effective glycemic control agent.4,5 A new review attempted to resolve these contradictions by examining the data from the randomized control trials carried out in the past. The results of this analysis were published recently in Nutrition and Metabolism.6 Nine randomized clinical trials involving a total of 283 participants with T2DM were included in the analysis. While all studies monitored fasting plasma glucose, some also monitored glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin resistance. They also monitored systolic and diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and insulin concentrations. The daily dose of resveratrol in these studies ranged from 8 milligrams to 3000 milligrams taken over a period that varied from four weeks to 12 months. The data from these studies were pooled together and statistically analyzed. The results show that resveratrol significantly reduced fasting plasma glucose levels in patients with T2DM compared to the control group. Fasting plasma glucose levels were reduced significantly in patients who received high doses of resveratrol but did not decline in those who received low Continue reading >>

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