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Resistant Starch Type 2 Diabetes

Resistant Starch And Diabetes Experiment 8

Resistant Starch And Diabetes Experiment 8

After hearing positive results of resistant starch and diabetes experimentation, I decided to throw my hat in the ring. Why experiment with Resistant Starch? This is not a ‘high carb’ food experiment. Resistant starch is a fiber found in many foods, including potatoes. Resistant starch has improved people’s fasting blood sugars and more. Raw Potato Starch is at the very least, an inexpensive prebiotic. Instead of eating high carb foods containing varying amounts of resistant starch, I used Bob’s Red Mill Potato Starch, because it does not raise blood sugars appreciably. Potatoes contain resistant starch, but I do not eat them! They spike my blood sugars. This is NOT a post about ‘safe starches’, some believe that there are safe starches, foods like white potatoes, rice, beans and sweet potatoes. Do not be misled. Starches spike blood sugars just like sugars for me and should be avoided. Ok… buckle up, this could be a bumpy ride. Introduction to Resistant Starch Resistant Starch is that part of starches that is resistant to the body’s attempt to process it in the stomach and small intestine. It is resistant to digestion, hence the name resistant starch. Resistant Starch (RS) acts like and quacks like a fiber. I wish it had been named ‘resistant fiber’… so much confusion could be avoided. It’s also called a third fiber. You have soluble fiber, insoluble fiber and resistant starch. There are differing types of resistant starch, I’m testing ‘raw potato starch’. Potato Starch can be consumed with any thing you choose, I will often mix in water, heavy whipping cream and plain, full fat yogurt. Avoid mixing potato starch in hot foods or liquids and avoid using it in cooking. I’ve tested ‘starches’ repeatedly, potatoes, beans and rice raise m Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

Is there a way to reverse diabetes? Specifically, type 2 diabetes? You might be surprised to discover there are three unbelievable natural remedies that I don’t believe the medical establishment—or, more specifically, the pharmaceutical companies—want you to know about. Why would they not want you to know about this stuff? It’s because the pharmaceutical industry is a gigantic machine which has to sustain itself. The diabetic industry alone is massive, owing to the fact that over 300 million people in the world have type 2 diabetes. The treatments and medication used to treat diabetes are big business, so why would these companies be at all interested in truly reversing diabetes? How would that benefit them financially? Unfortunately, a lot of diabetes drugs don’t actually work, or work with limited success and a lot of potential side effects. Science has shown that—in terms of diabetic management—these drugs are more dangerous than anything. Drugs used in the 1950s, for the most part, have all been taken off the market because they were shown to increase the risk of heart disease. This has even happened recently with drugs like Avandia. It was the world’s most popular Type 2 diabetes drug until it was revealed to have side effects that caused serious heart problems. New drugs haven’t proven to be much better. With that in mind, I’m going to share with you 3 amazing, all-natural solutions to reverse diabetes. Even if you don’t have type 2 diabetes, these solutions can help you prevent it. Here’s something I want you to realize; please never forget this: If you have type two diabetes, it’s not a life sentence. It’s actually one of the easiest—and I don’t say that in a condescending way; I say it in an optimistic way—diseases to completel Continue reading >>

Resistant Starch 101 Everything You Need To Know

Resistant Starch 101 Everything You Need To Know

Resistant Starch 101 Everything You Need to Know Written by Kris Gunnars, BSc on June 4, 2017 Most of the carbohydrates in the diet are starches. Starches are long chains of glucose that are found in grains, potatoes and various foods. But not all of the starch we eat gets digested. Sometimes a small part of it passes through the digestive tract unchanged. In other words, it is resistant to digestion. This type of starch is called resistant starch, which functions kind of like soluble fiber . Many studies in humans show that resistant starch can have powerful health benefits. This includes improved insulin sensitivity, lower blood sugar levels, reduced appetite and various benefits for digestion ( 1 ). Resistant starch is actually a very popular topic these days. In the past few months, hundreds of people have experimented with it and seen major improvements by adding it to their diet. There Are 4 Different Types of Resistant Starch Not all resistant starches are the same. There are 4 different types ( 2 ). Type 1: Is found in grains, seeds and legumes and resists digestion because it is bound within the fibrous cell walls. Type 2: Is found in some starchy foods, including raw potatoes and green (unripe) bananas. Type 3: Is formed when certain starchy foods, including potatoes and rice, are cooked and then cooled. The cooling turns some of the digestible starches into resistant starches via a process called retrogradation ( 3 ). Type 4: Is man-made and formed via a chemical process. The classification is not that simple, though, as several different types of resistant starch can co-exist in the same food. Depending on how foods are prepared, the amount of resistant starch changes. For example, allowing a banana to ripen (turn yellow) will degrade the resistant starches Continue reading >>

Resistant Starch

Resistant Starch

Sorry i mean my bg fasting is 90. In the morning and after meals 119 or 125 my dr wants me to take metformin its been 3 weeks and i cant get myself to take it .I was diagnosed 3 months ago so why now?? D.D. Family type 2 since January 27th, 2016 I did a bit of reading on it. Sounds like a bunch of wishful thinking to me. I did a bit of reading on it. Sounds like a bunch of wishful thinking to me. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Seen it mentioned a few times but never saw anyone with good results with it the things fade after a few days. Resistant starch improves insulin sensitivity I have had good results with resistant starch. It improves insulin sensitivity, especially for people who are insulin resistant. It does not seem to work for people who are insulin sensitive, though. In fact, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a qualified health claim in December of last year that resistant corn starch helps reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, based on 8 published clinical trials. You have to have really impressive data to get the US FDA to approve anything, so you know there's something there. The clinical studies show that you need to take 15-30 grams of resistant starch a day to see the improvement in insulin sensitivity. Many friends have reversed prediabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes back to normal blood sugar levels using Hi-maize resistant starch, the brand used in the clinical trials. It is very hard to get these kind of quantities in foods alone, but you could try. Looking more closely - It may be different for people with T2D compared to prediabetics. Most of the clinicals have been done with prediabetics, overweight and/or non-diabetic participants. I have seen only one clinical measuring insulin sensitivity in well controlled type 2 Continue reading >>

Fda Announces Resistant Starch Health Claim For Type 2 Diabetes | Resistant Starch

Fda Announces Resistant Starch Health Claim For Type 2 Diabetes | Resistant Starch

The FDA announces new level C qualified health claim for resistant starch The US Food and Drug Administration just approved a Level C Qualified Health Claim that resistant cornstarch reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes. Click here for the link to the FDA site with this announcement. This is a huge development that happened in a quick 13 years, as the first clinical trial was published in 2003. Maybe 21 years if you consider that the first rat study demonstrating improved insulin sensitivity was published in 1995. Health claims are extraordinarily difficult to achieve. Only a few foods or ingredients have achieved this milestone. This is the highest claim achieved for a food or dietary ingredient in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. This is a breakthrough and enhances the credibility of resistant starch! High-amylose maize resistant starch may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. FDA has concluded that there is limited scientific evidence for this claim. One of the graphics that the FDA used in its 2005 consumer research as an option to communicate this type of evidence is shown to the right. Another way to say a C level claim is Some evidence suggests that resistant starch from high amylose corn may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. So, while the limited scientific evidence disclaimer might sound a bit questionable, it in fact communicating that the FDA considers that some credible evidence exists suggesting that resistant starch helps to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Insulin, made in the pancreas, plays a major role in metabolism it significantly impacts the way the body uses digested food for energy. Insulin helps cells throughout the body absorb glucose. Insulin sensitivity is a measurement of how effective insulin works in helping cells absorb glucose fr Continue reading >>

[effects Of Resistant Starch On Insulin Resistance Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients].

[effects Of Resistant Starch On Insulin Resistance Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients].

[Effects of resistant starch on insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients]. Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100050, China. Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2007 Mar;41(2):101-4. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of resistant starch (RS) on insulin resistance (IR) in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. METHODS: All 40 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly divided into two groups: Group A and Group B. Cross-design of two stages (I, II) was used during observation. Group A received RS 30 g/d as an intervention group for ahead of 4 weeks ( I stage) , while group B as a control group. Group B was given RS in late 4 weeks (II stage), while Group A as served control group. Blood was taken the first day and on the latest day in each stage. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), post blood glucose (PBG), fructosamine (FMN), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceridemic (TG), insulin sensitive index (ISI), and body mass index (BMI) were measured, respectively. RESULTS: As Compared with the control group, ISI was higher and FBG, PBG, TC, TG, FMN and BMI were significantly lower in intervention group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: RS should be effective in improving IR of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Continue reading >>

Why Resistant Starch Matters

Why Resistant Starch Matters

Would you believe me if I told you that potato starch can help drop your sugars and reduce your weight? Let me explain about an important nutrient that you can easily add to your diet. We know that ‘starch’ is bad for us, it converts into glucose and sends blood sugars sky high - so what makes this so different? Resistant starch is also known as the 3rd type of fibre. It is a substance that your body can’t digest but for the friendly bacteria in your digestive system it’s their food. It is resistant to your digestion. Many studies have demonstrated that there are lots of beneficial effects for our health. Research is constantly highlighting the important role that our gut bacteria play in our health. The bacteria in our digestive system outnumber our cells 10-1 and they weight 3 lbs - it makes sense that our health is intimately connected. The collective name for all the bacteria that live in our digestive system is microbiome and they are critical when it comes to our overall health and have a big role to play in diabetes and obesity too. Feed the bugs Feeding your microbiome (the good gut bacteria) – and the cells that line your intestines – seems to affect hormone levels in the body (GLP-1 etc.), which in turn has a positive effect on blood sugars and the body's sensitivity to insulin. Our ancestors had a diet rich in resistant starch, it is only as our diet has become more processed that resistant starch starting reducing in our diet. Resistant starch is the perfect food for your microbiome and the benefit for you is that they convert the starch into short chain fatty acids that help with bowel health and impact When the bacteria digest the resistant starch they produce a number of really important chemicals, one of which is called butyrate Butyrate is t Continue reading >>

Resistant Starch: What Is It? - Mindbodygreen

Resistant Starch: What Is It? - Mindbodygreen

If you think all carbohydrates are bad, resistant starch might change your mind. This healthy carbohydrate boasts a ton of gut-healthy benefits. It's also incredibly easy to incorporate into your everyday diet. Resistant starch is a type of prebiotic, insoluble dietary fiber that resists normal digestion in the small intestine. It makes its way to the large intestine undigested, where it preferentially feeds the good bacteria. The bacterial fermentation of resistant starch produces butyrate and other beneficial short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) that are an important fuel source for colonic cells. These SCFAs help maintain a normal colonocyte population , which contributes to healthy function and disease prevention in the large intestine. There are four main types of resistant starch , which are classified based on their source. Type I refers to starch that is physically inaccessible to digestive enzymes because its trapped in plant cell walls. This is found in grains, seeds, and some legumes. Type II is untreated starch from high-amylose plants known to resist digestion in their raw state. Cooking these foods removes the resistant starch. This includes raw potatoes, green bananas, and raw plantains. Type III is "retrograde starch," which refers to starchy foods that have been cooked then cooled, which changes the structure and renders them more resistant to digestion. This includes cooked then cooled potatoes, rice, and other grains. Type IV refers to starch that has been chemically modified to resist digestion and does not occur in nature. This is typically found in processed foods and is included here for completeness but not recommended. What are the health benefits of resistant starch? Preparing carbohydrates in a way that increases the resistant starch content can ac Continue reading >>

Endocrine Connections | Mobile

Endocrine Connections | Mobile

It is estimated that 25.8 million children and adults in the USA have diabetes (8.3% of the population), equating to a health cost of $218 billion (10% of total healthcare expenditure). Lifestyle interventions, predominantly modulations to dietary intake, are the first-line strategy in diabetes treatment and remain a constant theme throughout management. Traditionally, dietary fibers have been used to manage blood glucose concentration and have been linked to improved glycemic control in both healthy groups and those with diabetes through various meta-analyses (1) . The USDA-recommended fiber intake is 14 g/1000 kcal in healthy individuals, with evidence currently lacking to recommend a higher intake in people with diabetes. This was highlighted in a scientific advisory committee (SACN) statement on nutrition that stated, although cereal fiber intake has been associated with a reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and metabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance, the majority of evidence relates to T2DM prevention. While this is important given the current obesity epidemic, it cannot necessarily be translated into health benefits for those patients with T2DM (2) . Resistant starch (RS) is a type of cereal fiber and has been shown to have beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and fatty acid (FA) metabolism in both healthy individuals and those with metabolic syndrome (3, 4, 5, 6, 7) . However, the efficacy of RS in individuals with T2DM has not been investigated. Animal studies have consistently shown that RS improves glucose and insulin metabolism through increased postprandial GLP1 secretion due to stimulation of the colonic enteroendocrine cells (8, 9) . This can result in improved insulin secretion. Most recently our own data has shown restored first- Continue reading >>

Nearly Half Of American Adults Are Pre-diabetic Or Diabetic

Nearly Half Of American Adults Are Pre-diabetic Or Diabetic

These foods supply important nutrients that are often low in diabetics and pre-diabetics, and linked to conditions like stroke, heart disease, hypertension, gastrointestinal ailments and obesity About half of all American adults are either pre-diabetic or diabetic. Even one-third of normal-weight adults may also be pre-diabetic without knowing it Diabetes is rooted in insulin resistance and malfunctioning leptin signaling, caused by chronically elevated insulin and leptin levels. This is why treating type 2 diabetes with insulin does not resolve the problem Dietary recommendations for diabetics include a diet high in healthy fats, moderate protein and low in net carbs. Nine specific superfoods for diabetics are also reviewed By Dr. Mercola As of 2012, up to 14 percent of the American population had type 2 diabetes, and as much as 38 percent were pre-diabetic. This suggests about HALF of all American adults are either pre-diabetic or diabetic.1,2 At least 20 percent of the population in every U.S. state is also obese3 — a condition that severely predisposes you to diabetes. That said, being skinny is not a blanket assurance of health. Recent research suggests one-third of normal-weight adults may also be pre-diabetic without knowing it.4 Children are also getting fatter and unhealthier. According to recent research, 7 million children in the U.S. have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and close to one-third of these kids also have either pre-diabetes or diabetes.5 Great Britain has also seen a rapid rise in these conditions. In 2003, 11.6 percent of people in Great Britain were diagnosed with pre-diabetes. That number had tripled by 2011, reaching over 35 percent. As noted by BBC News,6 "The world is facing an 'unrelenting march' of diabetes that now affects ne Continue reading >>

Carbs And Cooking

Carbs And Cooking

Pasta, potatoes and rice... are all carbohydrates that cause a surge in blood glucose levels as they are broken down. For people with diabetes, these surges in glucose can be tricky to manage and cause problems over time. But what if simply changing the way these foods were prepared and cooked meant this was less likely to happen? An experiment on the BBC TV show Trust me, I’m a Doctor, led by Dr Denise Robertson (senior nutrition scientist at the University of Surrey), showed that eating cooled or reheated pasta – turning it into ‘resistant starch’ – could help to reduce the rise of blood glucose levels. Though further studies are needed, findings could have long-term benefits for people with diabetes... The experiment At Positano Italian restaurant in Guildford, Surrey, 10 of the staff agreed to take part in an experiment, devised by Dr Robertson. Each of them ate one bowl of white pasta a day for three days. On each day the pasta was prepared in a different way (as follows) and topped with the same simple tomato sauce. Day 1: Hot freshly cooked pasta Day 2: Cold pasta that had been chilled overnight Day 3: Pasta that had been chilled overnight and reheated After eating each bowl of pasta the participants measured their blood glucose levels every 15 minutes for two hours. The results Eating freshly cooked pasta caused the biggest rise in blood glucose.Eating freshly cooked pasta caused the biggest rise in blood glucose. Eating chilled pasta caused a slightly lower rise.Eating chilled pasta caused a slightly lower rise. Unexpectedly, pasta that had been cooked, chilled and then reheated caused the lowest rise of all.Unexpectedly, pasta that had been cooked, chilled and then reheated caused the lowest rise of all. How it works Starch is the most common carbohy Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Benefits Of Eating Digestive Resistant Starches

Diabetes Diet: Benefits Of Eating Digestive Resistant Starches

Diabetes Diet: Benefits of Eating Digestive Resistant Starches Eating foods with digestive-resistant starch (DRS) helps maintain steady blood sugar levels, and may improve insulin sensitivity. DRS passes through the stomach and small intestine unchanged, and once in our large intestine functions much like soluble fiber. These slowly fermenting starches feed our friendly gut bacteria, increase production of beneficial short-chain fatty acids, and reduce inflammation by lowering the pH level. You may already enjoy the benefits of DRS if you regularly eat: Legumes: lentils, white beans, peas, kidney beans, chickpeas. Potato starch, tapioca starch, brown rice flour. Potatoes, yams and pastas that are cooked, and cooled (heating and cooling alters the chemical structure). We can also add DRS to our diet by purchasing raw potato starch (e.g., Bobs Red Mill Raw Potato Starch). Its inexpensive, and a tablespoon contains about eight grams of resistant starch. Because of its unobtrusive taste potato starch can be sprinkled on many foods, added to smoothies, or mixed into a glass of water. This is a good way for low-carb dieters to get their DRS. When using raw potato starch begin slowly, working up to one or two tablespoons per day. Taking too much right away might lead to some abdominal discomfort, and surprising flatulence. It may take at least four weeks to notice any benefit. Those on a prescribed diet should talk to their doctor or dietitian before imbibing supplemental potato starch. Beside the digestive perks of consuming resistant starch, there may be metabolic benefits helpful for those with pre- or type 2 diabetes: Several studies indicate that DRS effectively lowers post-meal blood sugar levels. Plus, resistant starch has a second meal effect, so if you eat it at brea Continue reading >>

Resistant Starch And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Resistant Starch And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Resistant Starch and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Volpe, Stella Lucia Ph.D., R.D., L.D.N., FACSM Stella Lucia Volpe, Ph.D., R.D., L.D.N., FACSM, is professor and chair of the Department of Nutrition Science at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA. Her degrees are in both Nutrition and Exercise Physiology; she also is an ACSM Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist and a registered dietitian. Dr. Volpes research focuses on obesity and diabetes prevention using traditional interventions, mineral supplementation, and more recently, by altering the environment to result in greater physical activity and healthy eating. Dr. Volpe is an associate editor of ACSMs Health & Fitness Journal. Disclosure: The author declares no conflict of interest and does not have any financial disclosures. A colleague of mine asked if I would write this Nutritionists View on resistant starch and its effects on type 2 diabetes mellitus. I thought this would be an interesting article to write. Before discussing research on resistant starch and health, it is first necessary to define what resistant starch is. Starch is the primary form of plant carbohydrate; however, the digestibility of starch can vary among different starchy foods. There are different types of starches, and they are classified as rapidly digestible starch, slowly digestible starch, or resistant starch ( 1,7 ). These classifications are based on the rate of glucose released and the absorption of that type of starch within the body. Resistant starch is not digested in the small intestine. Resistant starch can be fermented in the large intestine, and because of this, purported health benefits include increased absorption of some minerals, fuel for probiotic microorganisms, prevention of colon cancer, decreased risk of gall stone product Continue reading >>

Insulin-sensitizing Effects Of Dietary Resistant Starch And Effects On Skeletal Muscle And Adipose Tissue Metabolism

Insulin-sensitizing Effects Of Dietary Resistant Starch And Effects On Skeletal Muscle And Adipose Tissue Metabolism

Insulin-sensitizing effects of dietary resistant starch and effects on skeletal muscle and adipose tissue metabolism From the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom (MDR, ASB, ALD, and KNF) and INSERM U-449/INRA-1235, Lyon, France (HV) Search for other works by this author on: From the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom (MDR, ASB, ALD, and KNF) and INSERM U-449/INRA-1235, Lyon, France (HV) Search for other works by this author on: From the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom (MDR, ASB, ALD, and KNF) and INSERM U-449/INRA-1235, Lyon, France (HV) Search for other works by this author on: From the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom (MDR, ASB, ALD, and KNF) and INSERM U-449/INRA-1235, Lyon, France (HV) Search for other works by this author on: From the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom (MDR, ASB, ALD, and KNF) and INSERM U-449/INRA-1235, Lyon, France (HV) Address reprint requests to KN Frayn, Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, OX3 7LJ, United Kingdom. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 82, Issue 3, 1 September 2005, Pages 559567, M Denise Robertson, Alex S Bickerton, A Louise Dennis, Hubert Vidal, Keith N Frayn; Insulin-sensitizing effects of dietary resistant starch and effects on skeletal muscle and adipose tissue metabolism, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 82, Issue 3, 1 Septemb Continue reading >>

Resistant Starch And Diabetes My Story

Resistant Starch And Diabetes My Story

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi my name is Tom and hail from Johnstone, Renfrewshire. I am 64 years old and was diagnosed with type2 diabetes in 2007. My medication is 1 metformin twice daily. My hba1c was up and down in the first few years and was in control after that until 2 years ago when it started going up steadily. Was at 76 mmol when I was informed I had to see the surgery pharmacist and that they wanted to up my medication. When I spoke to the pharmacist I said I wasnt keen on upping my medication and we agreed that I could find out a way to control my diabetes better, as long as I had another hba1c test in 3 months and then it would be reviewed. When I came back my next hba1c was 54 mmol. The pharmacist said that was a really good result and asked what I had done to acheive this. Told her that I had found out online about something called Resitant Starch she had never heard of this and asked what it was and what I was doing. Told her only changes I had made in the 3 months were taking a semi green banana first thing in the morn. Then I would have overnight oats mid morn. After that I would eat what I wanted within reason as I wasnt sure if the Resistant Starch would really work although after reading lots of information online about it I was reasonably confident it would. (this is about 10 to 15 grams of resistant starch). Told her I intended to add a supplemet to my diet, potato starch this is really high in resistant starch and I added 3 tablespoons daily as well as the banana and oats. (about another 30 grams of resistant starch for a total of 40 grams plus) She was happy with the way thing were going and we agreed to have another test in 3 months and see how i was d Continue reading >>

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