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High? What Your Glucose Meter May Know, But Isn't Sharing

High? What Your Glucose Meter May Know, But Isn't Sharing

Your glucose meter might be keeping secrets from you. If and when you see a message on the screen alerting you to a "High" blood sugar, the meter probably knows more than it's telling you, as in the exact numerical value associated with that warning. But the device makers decided that we don't need that information... This came to light (in our brains, at least) following the March 25 announcement that almost two million LifeScan OneTouch VerioIQ meters were being recalled across the globe. LifeScan issued warnings on three brands of its OneTouch meters, totaling over 1.8 million meters worldwide! About 90,000 of its popular VerioIQ meters here in the U.S., part of the 1.2 million of those meters sold globally, and two brands sold outside the States: the OneTouch® Verio®Pro consumer meter and VerioPro+ professional meter. The reason for the recall? The meter software isn't properly registering extremely high blood sugars. At a certain point the meter shuts down with no warning and without alerting you to the hyperglycemic danger. The number you have to reach for this to happen: 1024 mg/dL (or 56.8 mmol to those outside the U.S.)! Geez, the number 1024 is oddly specific... Like many meters, LifeScan's units only show a numerical value for anything between 20-600, while anything outside that range just displays an "Extreme Low Glucose (below 20 mg/dL)" or "Extreme High Glucose (above 600 mg/dL)" message. So, who would have thought the meter actually knows when you've tipped past 1023? Maybe our meters are smarter than we give them credit for, despite the fact that they're sometimes a bit off thanks to that pesky +/-20% accuracy standard that we don't think is good enough. Why No Numbers? LifeScan confirmed our suspicions: Yes, their meters can track your blood sugar's n Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter Accuracy

Glucose Meter Accuracy

I became pre-diabetic about 4 years ago, and knocked it out pretty quick by cutting back on the carbs. However while I was taking care of it I had this experience with glucose meters. I bought one on Amazon, can't remember which one but it was rated good by other users. It seemed to me to reading way too high, about 50 high. My lab blood work had shown my fasting glucose to be about 112. This meter was showing me about 160 in the morning. So I took it with me to a lab and got blood drawn there and with the same blood draw I took a reading with the meter. The lab results with blood taken at the same time was about 40 or 50 lower than my So I called the company and told them about it. After getting quite a run around they sent me a new meter. Again I checked the new one against the old meter. They agreed, they both At walmart they had some cheap meters so I bought a "Reli On" for a few bucks and some test strips. This one showed me about 40 or 50 lower than the other two meters. So it was giving readings more like my professional lab results. I put the other meters aside and used this one which seemed to be pretty After a while, I ran out of test strips and got some more. These had a different calibration. Maybe the first one was F2 and these were F3, can't remember what the number was, it was different. Now the meter when you use it, first thing it does is identify the strip, so it knows what calibration is being used. Now these strips read higher than the last ones, and they read higher than the lab did when I ran a head to head comparison, but the difference was not too great, Anyway, I got the glucose under control, lost the Again, my yearly blood lab showed me running up over 111 fasting, so I bought another "Reli On" since the last one was pretty good. First thing Continue reading >>

How Accurate Is Your Glucose Meter? Investigators Tested 18 Of Them

How Accurate Is Your Glucose Meter? Investigators Tested 18 Of Them

If your blood glucose meter were put through a rigorous, scientific trial for accuracy, do you think it would pass? A study run by the Diabetes Technology Society put 18 FDA approved, commercially available Blood Glucose Monitor Systems (BGMSs) to the test, and the results were surprising. DTS Surveillance Study A nonprofit organization, the Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) exists to promote the “development and use of technology in the fight against diabetes.” Their BGMS Surveillance Program was initiated because glucose meters do not always live up to the accuracy claims that resulted in their FDA approval, or to international standards of accuracy. For this study: 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGMs) were obtained through retail outlets and tested in three separate trials, each done at different U.S. locations. More than 1,000 people participated in the study: 370 with type 1 diabetes, 470 with type 2 diabetes, and 4 with pre-diabetes. The remaining participants were not diabetic. Ages ranged from 18 to 87. To get a passing grade, each meter had to function within 15 percent, or 15 mg/dl of laboratory values over 95 percent of the time. The BGMs were coded, so no one involved with the study - investigators, statisticians, lab staff, or sponsor - knew which meter brands were passing or failing until all the results were calculated and published. More detailed study information can be obtained at the DTS website (link below). Meter Results The 18 BGMs tested represent about 90 percent of the commercially available products used from 2013 to 2015 by diabetes patients, and only six of them received passing marks: Contour Next by Ascensia (was Bayer) - accurate 100 percent of the time Accu-Chek Aviva Plus by Roche - 98 percent Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) by Arkr Continue reading >>

Class 1 Device Recall Relion Ultima Glucose Monitoring System

Class 1 Device Recall Relion Ultima Glucose Monitoring System

Class 1 Device Recall ReliOn Ultima Glucose Monitoring System Class 1 Device Recall ReliOn Ultima Glucose Monitoring System Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc., 1360 South Loop Road, Alameda, CA 94502 All lot numbers are included in this recall. User may inadvertently change the Units of Measure from mg/dL to mmol/L and the blood glucose results could be misinterpreted. This may lead to under treatment and potential for hyperglycemia. The firm has undertaken a field correction to notify their customers of the potential for the units of measure to be changed. The firm plans to (1) include a flyer in all Precision Xtra and FreeStyle meter kits to reinforce current labeling regarding units of measure and update the Frequently Asked Questions section of the website to reinforce the units of measure change, (2) Lock out the units of measure in new production meters to eliminate potential to change the units of measure settings, update the meter kits with a flyer to override the section of the manual indicating that the units of measure are changeable, and change the product insert in glucose test strips to indicate which units of measure are appropriate for the user and (3) update the labeling to indicate that the units of measure are not user configurable to eliminate the need for the flier. Approximately 10,005,206 meters have been distributed worldwide since 1999, with 5,885,332 meters distributed in the US, and 4,517,211 in use. 1 A record in this database is created when a firm initiates a correction or removal action. The record is updated if the FDA identifies a violation and classifies the action as a recall, and it is updated for a final time when the recall is terminated. Learn more about medical device recalls . 2 Per FDA policy, recall cause determinations are subject to Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Sometimes my blood glucose monitor seems to give incorrect readings. What can I do to make sure the measurement is accurate? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. When used correctly, blood glucose monitors — small devices that measure and display your blood sugar level — are usually accurate. But occasionally they may be incorrect. Consider these factors that affect meter accuracy and the steps to resolve or prevent the problem: Factors that affect accuracy Solutions Test strip problems Throw out damaged or outdated test strips. Store strips in their sealed container; keep them away from heat, moisture and humidity. Be sure the strips are meant for your specific glucose meter. Extreme temperatures Keep your glucose meter and test strips at room temperature. Alcohol, dirt or other substances on your skin Wash and dry your hands and the testing site thoroughly before pricking your skin. Improper coding Some meters must be coded to each container of test strips. Be sure the code number in the device matches the code number on the test strip container. Monitor problems Fully insert the test strip into the monitor. Replace the monitor batteries as needed. Not enough blood applied to the test strip Touch a generous drop of blood to the test strip. Don't add more blood to the test strip after the first drop is applied. Testing site location If you're using a site other than your fingertip and you think the reading is wrong, test again using blood from a fingertip. Blood samples from alternate sites aren't as accurate as fingertip samples when your blood sugar level is rising or falling quickly. The amount of red blood cells in your blood If you are dehydrated or your red blood cell count is low (anemia), your test results may be less accurate. Blood glucose monitor quality Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter Shopping Guide

Glucose Meter Shopping Guide

By the dLife Editors Looking for a blood glucose monitor? Here’s our extensive guide to the products on the market today. dLife does not endorse any product mentioned here. Links to manufacturers’ websites are offered for information purposes only. Abbot The FreeStyle Freedom Lite Blood Glucose Monitoring System has a new ergonomic shape and large numeral display. There is no coding and allows for easy testing with the world’s smallest sample size. This meter uses only FreeStyle Lite test strips. Blood Sample Size Required: 0.3 uL Time to Results: 5-seconds Battery Requirements: (1) CR2032 lithium coin cell Alternative Site Testing: Yes Data Capabilities: Computer download capabilities; stores up to 400 results with date and time User Coding Required: No Other Special Features: Four reminder alarms; ability to add more blood for up to one minute; provides results in 7-, 14-, and 30-day averages Company Contact Information: Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 1-800-522-5226 www.abbottdiabetescare.com The FreeStyle Lite Blood Glucose Monitoring System is a small and discreet system that offers key features such as no coding, the world’s smallest blood sample size, and a test strip port light. The FreeStyle Lite meter uses only FreeStyle Lite test strips. Blood Sample Size Required: 0.3 uL Time to Results: 5-seconds Battery Requirements: (1) CR2032 lithium coin cell Alternative Site Testing: Yes Data Capabilities: Computer download capabilities; stores up to 400 results with date and time User Coding Required: No Other Special Features: Port light and backlight on display; four reminder alarms; provides 7-, 14-, and 30-day averages Company Contact Information: Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 1-800-522- Continue reading >>

Free: Reli On Blood Glucose Meter Diabetic Blood Sugar

Free: Reli On Blood Glucose Meter Diabetic Blood Sugar

The listing, Reli On Blood Glucose Meter Diabetic Blood Sugar has ended. The ReliOn® Micro blood glucose meter provides a solution to your testing needs in one of the smallest meters on the market. Despite its compact size, the ReliOn® Micro offers all the features you would expect from a full-function meter including: •No Coding Required •Small Sample Size, only 0.3 micro liters •7,14,30 day averaging •Pre/Post Meal Flagging •50 test memory with time and date stamp •5 changeable faceplates to customize the look of your meter I bought this at Walmart and the pharmacist handed me the wrong strips for it but they don't accept returns for diabetic supplies. So, I'm stuck with it. I didn't even use it a single time so no worries of contamination. Original packaging. Good to have even if you aren't a diabetic. Continue reading >>

How Do I Sync My Compatible Blood Glucose Meter With Glooko?

How Do I Sync My Compatible Blood Glucose Meter With Glooko?

First things first! In order to sync a reading from certain blood glucose (BG) meters, you'll first need to make sure you set up your MeterSync™ Blue. Don't know how to do that? That's okay! Click here to learn how! Now that your MeterSync™ Blue is set up and ready to go, you're are ready to start syncing readings from your BG meter! Let's Learn how to: Sync BG readings (iOS) From the Home screen: Click Sync Device. Select your meter from the list of diabetic devices. Choose to watch the Tutorial Video, or if you already know how to sync, click 'I know how to sync'. Click Sync. Sync BG readings (Android) From the Home screen: Click Sync Device. Select your meter from the list of diabetic devices. Choose to watch the Tutorial Video, or if you already know how to sync, click 'I know how to sync'. Click Sync. Continue reading >>

Low Inventories Of Walmart 50 Count Reli On Prime Test Strips

Low Inventories Of Walmart 50 Count Reli On Prime Test Strips

I use the Reli On Prime glucometer and test strips. Without health insurance I have grown to rely on them. Yes, that pun was intended. However, the last couple of trips to two different Walmarts in the southwestern Pennsylvania area has yielded slim pickings for the product. The first Walmart was completely out. The second Walmart only had two of the 100 count boxes of Reli On Prime blood glucose test strips. I asked an employee in the pharmacy at the second Walmart if there was a supply problem with the Reli On Prime test strips. He said that he thinks that the 50 count test strips are being discontinued, and that the 100 count product size is going to be substituted. The 100 count box contains two 50 count bottles. There is a green circle on the barcode label on the Walmart shelf for the 50 count boxes. The employee said this makes it likely that version has been discontinued. He said he would look into it to get more information. The green circle on the shelf label must have an internal meaning in the store that indicated to the employee I spoke to that the product was being “phased out” as he put it. The issue I have is that there was no warning of this. A supply line interruption that is unforeseen obviously cannot come with a warning that inventory can get low. However, this appears to have been foreseen – to have been planned, actually. If that is the case, then this is a major issue. Why? Permit me to explain. The consumers purchasing these test strips are likely to not have health insurance or have a high copay or other out-of-pocket expense for glucometer test strips. I am very grateful for the Reli On brand of diabetic supplies including the different test strips they make. However, since I use an insulin pump and absolutely have to test several times p Continue reading >>

Relion Ultima Blood Glucose Meter Review

Relion Ultima Blood Glucose Meter Review

Editor's Note: This review has been removed from our side-by-side comparison because it no longer ranks as a top 10 product. The original review is below, but check out our current Glucometer Reviews here. The ReliOn Ultima blood glucose meter is a low-cost alternative for people who need to check their blood sugar levels on a regular basis. It's compact, fast and affordable, and it doesn't require complicated coding when using its branded glucose testing strips. The ReliOn Ultima blood glucose meter uses low-cost diabetic testing supplies that make it a good choice if you are uninsured, under-insured or on a limited budget. The glucometer comes with a lancing device and a small batch of lancets, and the unit's required test strips are very affordable. This glucose meter is for sale exclusively at Walmart and Sam's Club stores. Speed, accuracy and ease of use are all hallmarks of the ReliOn Ultima blood glucose meter. It comes with a comprehensive user manual, and it only takes a few steps to set it up for your first test. It can read glucose levels between 20 and 600 mg/dL, and it only takes five seconds or less to process blood test results and display them on the oversize display screen. Built-in memory is capable of storing up to 450 test results. This blood sugar monitor allows alternate site testing on the fingertips, forearm, thumb base or upper arm; although, the manufacturer recommends using blood only from the fingertip if you suffer from hypoglycemia or suspect that your blood sugars may be running low. To make testing more comfortable, the ReliOn Ultima blood glucose meter requires a blood sample size of only 0.6 microliters to get accurate results. The compact size of the ReliOn Ultima blood glucose meter also makes it an attractive option. The glucometer m Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

These 10 meters varied in age and wear.Some were old, some were new one wasmy own personalmeter that I used to calibrate my CGM and make mission-criticaldecisions each day.All of them passed their respective control solution tests, so its safe to assume that they werein good working order. I tried to match the testing method employed by Chris (author of the original post ) as closely as possible. Eightrounds of testing were performed over the course of 24 hours according to the following procedure: Order of meters was randomized for each round. Tests were performed only when CGM readings were stable (i.e. no insulin on board and CGM showing a slope of ~0 mg/dL/min). I didnt do anything special to stabilize my blood glucose just tested as I went about a normal day. The test strips used for each meter all came from their own unique vials. Before and after completing the eight testing rounds, the meters were checked using their respective control solutions. They all passed the control solution tests. Unlike Chris, I didnt have an alarming spread in my results for any round. The overallbetween-meter variability (% Error, or %CV for you stats folks) was only 6%. In plain English:My treatment decisions wouldnt have varied much at all, regardless of the meter I was using. One unit of rapid-acting insulin brings my BG down by ~80 mg/dL, and I correct whenever Im over 100 mg/dL. Ill usually correct down to 70-110 mg/dL, depending on my plans for the next couplehours (big meal = correct to 70; workout = correct to 110). Iwasrelieved to see that even if I tooka correction bolus for the maximum BG of each round, I still would have been brought down to a desirableblood glucose level. For example, take Round 1. The highest reading I saw was 182 md/dL, and Id take 1 unit for that. Ev Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Relion Prime E 01 Error

Relion Prime E 01 Error

I'm having issues with continually get an E 01 Error on the relion prime. I got it to work yesterday at first l, but now most of the time I'm getting this error even when testing myself. This is my first week testing Boogey. I feel horrible. I can't keep poking his ears & paws are out of the question. Any input is appreciated. Everything is brand new. My hands are clean & dry. The test strip had enough blood to fill the box. I'm dipping the tip of strip in the blood. I don't understand what I'm doing wrong. Ahhhhh. Being a new diabetic momma is frustrating! According to the manual, E01 means 'a used strip has been inserted or the meter is having difficulty reading the strip'. Do you have any control solution to test the strips? I've never gotten that error message, so I'm not sure what else to suggest. @Bobbie And Bubba uses the prime, maybe she knows of something. This is the first I've heard of control solution. Is that available at Walmart? Or is it something I can make at home? Yes I use that meter and Sharon is correct, that is exactly what it means: a use strip has been inserted into the meter, ( I just checked it on myself and reinserted the strip and that is the code I got. Since that is not the case with you, try this, take the battery out of the meter and start all over with a set up and see if that helps. The control solution can be gotten through the company if you call them and request it (I think every meter should come with some......my personal pet peeve) Try taking the battery out and starting all over again with the set up and see if that helps. It takes a few weeks to get the control solution( I agree with Bobbie, it should come with the meter or at least be available at the store where the meter was purchased!). Try her recommendation and if that do Continue reading >>

Relion Prime User Instruction Manual

Relion Prime User Instruction Manual

CAUTION: Before using any product to test your blood sugar (blood glucose), read all instructions and practice the test. Do all quality control checks as directed and consult with a diabetes healthcare professional. These recommendations apply to all blood glucose monitoring systems and are supported by the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, the U.S. Always consult your diabetes healthcare professional before making any changes. All of the information needed to use the ReliOn® Prime System is included in this manual. Please read it thoroughly before using the system. If you have any questions, call Customer Service at 800.631.0076 (24 hours a day, 7 days a... Intended Use The ReliOn® Prime Blood Glucose Monitoring System is intended for the quantitative measurement of glucose in fresh capillary whole blood samples drawn from the fingertips or palm. Testing is done outside the body ( In Vitro Diagnostic Use). It is indicated for use at home (over the counter [OTC]) by persons with diabetes, or in clinical settings by healthcare professionals, as an aid to monitor the effectiveness of diabetes control. Important Information • Test results below 70 mg/dL indicate low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) • Test results above 240 mg/dL indicate high blood glucose (hyperglycemia) • If results are below 70 mg/dL or above 240 mg/dL, repeat the test • If results continue to measure below 70 mg/dL or above 240 mg/dL consult your diabetes healthcare professional immediately • If symptoms are not consistent with test results AND all the instructions have been followed carefully, contact your diabetes healthcare professional • Before testing, always make sure both the meter and test strips are at operating temperature... THE ReliOn® Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

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