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Relationship Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

The Diabetes And Heart Disease Link

The Diabetes And Heart Disease Link

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 16 No. 4 P. 12 Controlling blood sugar and lowering blood pressure and lipids can prevent heart disease in diabetes patients. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, and heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability in people with diabetes. In fact, the American Heart Association estimates that at least 68% of people aged 65 and older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease and 16% die of stroke. Heart disease death rates among adults with diabetes are two to four times higher than the rates for adults without diabetes. The burden of heart disease among children with diabetes is substantial, and the signs of heart disease likely will appear before the onset of puberty.1,2 This article explores the link between diabetes and heart disease and provides advice for dietitians on how to counsel clients and patients. Complicated Relationship The link between diabetes and heart disease is complex and multifactorial. Atherosclerosis, a major risk factor for heart disease, significantly threatens the macrovasculature of patients with diabetes.3 Dyslipidemia is highly correlated with atherosclerosis, and up to 97% of patients with diabetes are dyslipidemic.3 Together with smoking and hypertension, dyslipidemia disturbs endothelial function in various ways that accelerate atherosclerotic changes, including increased smooth muscle constriction of the coronary artery, enhanced thrombosis, and increased local inflammatory responses.4 Moreover, it appears the effects of these risk factors may be synergistic rather than just additive. In the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III), diabetes counts as a heart disease risk equivalent because it confers a high risk of hear Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Having diabetes means that you are more likely to develop heart disease and have a greater chance of a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes are also more likely to have certain conditions, or risk factors, that increase the chances of having heart disease or stroke, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. If you have diabetes, you can protect your heart and health by managing your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as your blood pressure and cholesterol. If you smoke, get help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease.1 People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than people without diabetes. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease or stroke as people without diabetes.2 The good news is that the steps you take to manage your diabetes also help to lower your chances of having heart disease or stroke. What else increases my chances of heart disease or stroke if I have diabetes? If you have diabetes, other factors add to your chances of developing heart disease or having a stroke. Smoking Smoking raises your risk of developing heart disease. If you have diabetes, it is important to stop smoking because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels. Smoking also increases your chances of developing other long-term problems such as lung disease. Smoking also can damage the blood vessels in your legs and increase the risk of lower leg infections, ulcers, a Continue reading >>

Heart Disease Biomarkers In Diabetes Research

Heart Disease Biomarkers In Diabetes Research

Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) encompasses a constellation of diseases related to the heart and circulatory system. Despite efforts to understand and combat CVD complications from diabetes, 65% of diabetics will pass away from cardiovascular issues1. Part 2 of The Common Denominator eBook series examines the relationship between diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and how investigators are using established heart disease biomarkers in diabetes research to understand the molecular mechanisms behind cardiovascular complications from diabetes. Overview of the Cardiovascular System The purpose of the cardiovascular system is to circulate blood throughout the body2. Blood flow not only allows for the transportation of oxygen and nutrients to organs, but also allows for the disposal of waste products2. Without this system, cells and organs would not be able to function. Specialized organs work together to make blood circulation possible including the blood, heart, blood vessels, and lungs. The Relationship Between Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Transporting blood, oxygen, glucose, and insulin throughout the body is a necessity. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the overall term used for many diseases that can affect the cardiovascular system and its ability to effectively orchestrate the flow of compounds in the body. The cardiovascular system uses blood to transport glucose from digested food to cells for fuel. Additionally the blood is used to transport insulin from the pancreas to cells in response to blood glucose levels3. The transportation of glucose and insulin make blood an important factor in the process of energy homeostasis3. Diabetics are at an increased risk to develop CVD complications such as atherosclerosis4, hypertension5, and myocardial infarc Continue reading >>

Articles Type 2 Diabetes And Incidence Of Cardiovascular Diseases: A Cohort Study In 1·9 Million People

Articles Type 2 Diabetes And Incidence Of Cardiovascular Diseases: A Cohort Study In 1·9 Million People

Summary The contemporary associations of type 2 diabetes with a wide range of incident cardiovascular diseases have not been compared. We aimed to study associations between type 2 diabetes and 12 initial manifestations of cardiovascular disease. We used linked primary care, hospital admission, disease registry, and death certificate records from the CALIBER programme, which links data for people in England recorded in four electronic health data sources. We included people who were (or turned) 30 years or older between Jan 1, 1998, to March 25, 2010, who were free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. The primary endpoint was the first record of one of 12 cardiovascular presentations in any of the data sources. We compared cumulative incidence curves for the initial presentation of cardiovascular disease and used Cox models to estimate cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs). This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01804439). Our cohort consisted of 1 921 260 individuals, of whom 1 887 062 (98·2%) did not have diabetes and 34 198 (1·8%) had type 2 diabetes. We observed 113 638 first presentations of cardiovascular disease during a median follow-up of 5·5 years (IQR 2·1–10·1). Of people with type 2 diabetes, 6137 (17·9%) had a first cardiovascular presentation, the most common of which were peripheral arterial disease (reported in 992 [16·2%] of 6137 patients) and heart failure (866 [14·1%] of 6137 patients). Type 2 diabetes was positively associated with peripheral arterial disease (adjusted HR 2·98 [95% CI 2·76–3·22]), ischaemic stroke (1·72 [1·52–1·95]), stable angina (1·62 [1·49–1·77]), heart failure (1·56 [1·45–1·69]), and non-fatal myocardial infarction (1·54 [1·42–1·67]), but was inversely associated with abdominal aort Continue reading >>

Your Cardiovascular System And Diabetes

Your Cardiovascular System And Diabetes

Cardiovascular system is one of the most important systems in the human body. It is comprised of the heart, blood and blood vessels. Blood is being pumped out from the heart and is the one responsible in delivering oxygen and other nutrients to all the parts of the body. It also cleans up our body by picking up the waste products on its way back to the heart so our body can get rid of them. So what has diabetes got to do with the cardiovascular system? Since blood is part of the cardiovascular system, and diabetes is a condition in which the level of glucose in the blood is higher than normal, then there must be some relationship between the two. Diabetes and cardiovascular system diseases has been recognized to be closely related to each other for some time now due to the so-called insulin resistance syndrome or metabolic syndrome. Among the 20 million people in the United States who has diabetes, around 5 to 6 million of this population who are aged 35 years and above were diagnosed to have a certain cardiovascular disease according to the National Diabetes Surveillance System. Some examples of the commonly diagnosed cardiovascular disease are coronary heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and other heart conditions. Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause now of deaths related to diabetes. In a study published few years back in the Journal of the American Medical Association, deaths due to some heart conditions went up by 23% in diabetic women despite the 27% drop of the same in non-diabetic women. As for diabetic men, there is only about 13% decrease in heart disease related deaths as compared to the 36% drop in non-diabetics. Thus, the two indeed go together. Risk Factors Diabetes is now considered by the American Heart Association a major risk factor in c Continue reading >>

What Does Diabetes Do To Your Heart Disease Risk?

What Does Diabetes Do To Your Heart Disease Risk?

Many people with diabetes also have heart disease. When you do things to take care of your diabetes, like manage your blood sugar, exercise, and eat a healthy diet, that's also good for your heart. It's important to understand your risk and how you can lower it. Besides diabetes, do you also have: A waist that's larger than 35 inches in women or 40 inches in men? Low levels of "good" ( HDL) cholesterol? High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol or triglycerides (another type of fat in the blood)? Even borderline elevated at 130/85 If you're not sure, your doctor can check all those numbers for you. Also, do you: Smoke? Have a family member with heart disease? Your doctor needs that information to work with you on a plan for better heart health. People with diabetes are at risk for: Coronary artery disease. Your coronary arteries are in your heart. Fatty deposits, called plaques, can narrow them. If plaque suddenly breaks, it can cause a heart attack. Exercise, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking are musts. It could be from coronary artery disease or from the diabetes. It can be dangerous and fatal, so aggressive management and follow up is essential Congestive heart failure. This is an ongoing condition in which the heart loses the ability to pump blood effectively. The main symptoms are shortness of breath when you're moving and leg swelling. Many people have both conditions. If you smoke, it's time to quit. Set a date and talk to your doctor. If you've tried to quit before, it's not too late. Many people try several times before they kick the habit for good. Nearly everyone with diabetes can benefit from getting more exercise. It's good for your heart and helps control your blood sugar. Even brisk walking counts, so you don't need a gym. If you're not active now, let Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Tweet Heart disease is a complication that may affect people with diabetes if their condition is not managed well for a prolonged period of time.. Coronary heart disease is recognized to be the cause of death for 80% of people with diabetes, however, the NHS states that heart attacks are largely preventable. [48] How are heart disease and diabetes linked? People suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes are more likely to be at risk from heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure. Vascular problems, such as poor circulation to the legs and feet, are also more likely to affect diabetes patients. Like diabetes itself, the symptoms of cardiovascular disease may go undetected for years. A Diabetes UK report from 2007 estimates that the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes is: [1] 5 times higher in middle aged men 8 times higher in women with diabetes. More than half of type 2 diabetes patients will exhibit signs of cardiovascular disease complications at diagnosis. Who does heart disease affect? Many people think that heart disease only affects the middle-aged and elderly. However, serious cardiovascular disease may develop in diabetics before the age of 30. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetics are at greater risk of developing heart disease. What is the cause of heart disease amongst diabetics? Hyperglycemia, which characterises diabetes, in combination with free fatty acids in the blood can change the makeup of blood vessels, and this can lead to cardiovascular disease. The lining of the blood vessels may become thicker, and this in turn can impair blood flow. Heart problems and the possibility of stroke can occur. What symptoms can identify heart disease? The following are common symptoms of heart disease, although this may vary from individual to indiv Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Coronary Heart Disease: A Risk Factor For The Global Epidemic

Diabetes And Coronary Heart Disease: A Risk Factor For The Global Epidemic

International Journal of Hypertension Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 697240, 7 pages 1Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 South First Avenue, Fahey Bldg, Maywood, IL 60153, USA 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48202, USA 3Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago and Vanguard Weiss Memorial Hospital, 4646 North Marine Drive, Chicago, IL 60640, USA Academic Editor: Eoin O'Brien Copyright © 2012 Maguy Chiha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death in the United States and the world. In this we will paper focus on type 2 diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for coronary heart disease, review the mechanisms of atherogenesis in diabetics, the impact of hypertension and the treatment goals in diabetics, the guidelines for screening, and review the epidemiologic consequences of diabetes and heart disease on a global scale. The underlying premise to consider diabetes a cardiovascular disease equivalent will be explored as well as the recommendations for screening and cardiac testing for asymptomatic diabetic patients. 1. Introduction Cardiovascular disease is currently responsible for 30% of all deaths worldwide with most of the burden now occurring in developing countries [1]. After a peak around 1968, death from coronary heart disease (CHD) has declined significantly in the United States [2]. Based on a statistical mortality model previously validated in Europe, N Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease, Chronic Kidney Disease, And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Proceeding With Caution At A Dangerous Intersection

Cardiovascular Disease, Chronic Kidney Disease, And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Proceeding With Caution At A Dangerous Intersection

Type 2 diabetes carries an unequivocal risk for cardiovascular disease.1 Patients with diabetes have the same risk for future cardiovascular events as survivors of myocardial infarction.2 Morbidity and mortality in diabetes is largely driven by atherosclerotic complications. Just the presence of diabetes has a fundamental, pervasive effect on the vasculature; for example, erasing the gender benefit seen in women in terms of cardiovascular disease and making all patients with diabetes less likely to benefit from advances in cardiovascular therapeutics. Given this grim picture, one could ask: Can it get much worse for the patient with diabetes and cardiovascular disease? Unfortunately, the answer is yes. In this issue of JASN, Schneider et al.3 offer more evidence that even within this dangerous intersection of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) confers a significant further increased risk for recurrent cardiovascular events, at least as seen within the Prospective Pioglitazone Clinical Trial in Macrovascular Events Study (PROactive).4 PROactive studied 5238 patients with type 2 diabetes and well-established cardiovascular disease: approximately 50% had a prior myocardial infarction and approximately 50% had a second qualifying cardiovascular event (stroke, peripheral vascular disease, coronary disease, or coronary intervention). Among the 5154 patients with renal data, 11.6% with an estimated GFR (eGFR) <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 had a primary composite end point of 27.5% versus 19.6% in those with normal eGFR.3 A new chapter is thus emerging in our understanding of cardiovascular risk—the impact of CKD. Adding diabetes to CKD only amplifies cardiovascular risk. Many of the metabolic abnormalities thought to promote atherosclerosis in type 2 Continue reading >>

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Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, but the number-one cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is actually heart disease. Heart disease and diabetes often occur together, and the link between them is high blood sugar. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. In fact, the CDC reports heart disease is responsible for one of every four deaths. For this reason, it’s essential for anyone with type 2 diabetes to understand the link between heart disease and diabetes and take proper preventative measures to manage or reverse their diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, you probably already know about insulin resistance. Because the body does not use insulin properly, the pancreas tries to compensate by making extra insulin. Over time, it can’t keep up, and the body cannot maintain normal blood glucose levels. (Find out more information about insulin resistance here.) Those high glucose levels can harden arteries over time. Your arteries need to be spacious and flexible to get proper blood and oxygen circulation throughout the body; tight and rigid arteries force the heart to work harder to pump the blood around. This leads to heart disease. Additionally, people with type 2 diabetes may follow certain lifestyles that can trigger heart disease. The same diet and habits that lead to type 2 diabetes can also lead to heart disease because of their connection to high blood pressure and high cholesterol. And it doesn’t stop there: Those same problems can lead to other conditions, such as erectile dysfunction or stroke. The good news: Both type 2 diabetes and heart disease can be prevented or managed by lifestyle choices. Lean proteins and heart-healthy meals can help keep cholesterol levels low, and ample research supports eating a vegetarian Continue reading >>

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The diabetes–heart disease connection and what it means for you Understand the interactions between these two conditions. Photo: Thinkstock Exercise and a heart-healty diet lowers risks from both heart disease and diabetes. Decades ago, data from the historic Framingham Heart Study revealed that having diabetes significantly increases your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. In the intervening years, scientists have learned more about how the two deadly diseases interact. But the magnitude of the problem has expanded as well. Currently, two-thirds of people with diabetes eventually die of heart disease or stroke. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Aaron contacted TheDiabetesCouncil with some questions related to diabetes and heart disease. Aaron is 57 years old. He has had Type 2 diabetes for 12 years. Aaron visited his doctor related to swelling in his ankles and feet, shortness of breath, and weight gain. After some tests, the doctor informed him that on top of his Type 2 diabetes, he now has congestive heart failure. He was now wondering why did he have heart disease now and was it because of his diabetes? In order to help Aaron and other people with diabetes understand the connection between diabetes and heart disease and how to prevent it, we decided to look into the specific link between the two diseases. What is the connection between diabetes and heart disease? According to the American Heart Association, there exist a relationship between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: 68% percent of people with diabetes who are aged 65 and older die from heart disease and 16% die of a stroke. People with diabetes are more likely to die from a heart disease than those without diabetes. The National Institute of Health states the following for people with diabetes: They have additional causes of heart disease They are at higher risk of heart disease than those who do not have diabetes They may develop heart disease at a younger age Risk assessment must take into account the major risk factors (cigarette smoking, elevated blood pressure, abnormal serum lipids and lipoproteins, and hyperglycemia) and predisposing risk factors (excess body weight and abdominal obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of CVD). Identification of risk factors is a major first step for developing a plan for risk reduction in persons with diabetes. – Scott M. Grundy et al, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease In two words, the conn Continue reading >>

What Is The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes?

What Is The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes?

Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease than nondiabetic people, and at least 65% of these patients will die from their heart disease. The most important advice for the diabetic patient is to control modifiable risk factors for heart disease with the following actions: Stop smoking. Lower your blood pressure. Control your weight. Exercise. Monitor your blood sugar levels. Diabetes doubles your risks for heart disease and stroke, according to the National Institutes of Health. Having diabetes also means you may develop these problems at a younger age. High blood sugar levels can lead to deposits of fat on the inside of blood vessel walls, increasing your chances of narrowed, hardened and/or clogged blood vessels. If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor about the best ways to lower your risks for heart disease. Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And You

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And You

Diabetes is a common disease that is on the rise in America. Having diabetes raises your risk for developing other dangerous conditions, especially heart disease and stroke. November is National Diabetes Month, a time to raise awareness about preventing and managing diabetes and protecting yourself from its complications. Diabetes is a serious condition that happens when your body can’t make enough of a hormone called insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it has. Insulin helps your body digest sugars that come from what you eat and drink. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood. Over time, that sugar buildup damages your nerves, blood vessels, heart, and kidneys. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, or about 1 of every 11 people. 1 About 8 million of them don’t know they have diabetes. Another 86 million—more than 1 in 3 Americans older than 20 years—have prediabetes, a condition in which a person’s blood sugar is high, but not yet high enough to trigger diabetes.2 Most people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Adults with type 2 diabetes are about twice as likely to die from heart disease as adults who do not have diabetes.3 Surprising Facts About Diabetes Women with diabetes have a 40% greater risk of developing heart disease and a 25% greater risk of stroke than men with diabetes do.5 Experts aren’t sure why the risk is so much greater in women with diabetes than in men with diabetes. Women’s biology may play a role: Women usually have more body fat, which can put them at greater risk for heart disease and stroke. If you are a woman with diabetes, you can take steps to control your condition and improve your chances for avoiding heart disease and stroke (see below). Almost 7 in 10 people with diabetes over age 65 will die o Continue reading >>

Are Egg Yolks Bad For You?

Are Egg Yolks Bad For You?

Egg yolks are not bad for you. This is a dogmatic myth. Just as one example (of countless) a 88-year old man ate 25 whole eggs per day and had normal cholesterol levels and was in very good health. Yeah, it's a study of one, but I'm making a point. Also, remember that not all eggs are the same. free ranged eggs from hens raised on pasture have more omega-3 and have more important fat soluble vitamins Studies with hundreds of thousands of people show whole eggs have no relation to heart disease and even a reduced chance of stroke. See below: Let me explain… Concerns arise about cholesterol levels and saturated fat being linked to heart disease and other ailments as it was many decades ago with rise in the popularity of the low fat diet. Remember, just because a macronutrient is called “fat” it doesn’t mean it expresses itself physiologically in this way when consumed. Colon cancer and coronary heart disease are only increased when protein consumption is above the recommended daily dose. LDL stands for Low Density Lipoprotein and HDL stands for High Density Lipoprotein. All “cholesterol” is identical. These aren’t actually cholesterol they are proteins which carry cholesterol around. When there was a massive correlation and speculation about heart disease and cholesterol it was because total cholesterol used to be measured as LDL + HDL. However, we know LDL is “bad” and HDL is “good” as LDL increases the risk while HDL decreases the risk. The logic used in an argument against saturated fat is that saturated fat increases LDL. What's more important is also about the number of LDL particles floating in the bloodstream (called LDL-p), instead of LDL concentration or even the size of the particles. Low-carb diets, such as the ketogenic diet tend to be hi Continue reading >>

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