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Relationship Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, And Breast Cancer: A Review Of The Current Evidence

Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, And Breast Cancer: A Review Of The Current Evidence

Diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and breast cancer: a review of the current evidence From the Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Address reprint requests to F Xue, Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Search for other works by this author on: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 86, Issue 3, 1 September 2007, Pages 823S835S, Fei Xue, Karin B Michels; Diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and breast cancer: a review of the current evidence, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 86, Issue 3, 1 September 2007, Pages 823S835S, Incidences of breast cancer, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome have increased over the past decades with the obesity epidemic, especially in industrialized countries. Insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and changes in the signaling of growth hormones and steroid hormones associated with diabetes may affect the risk of breast cancer. We reviewed epidemiologic studies of the association between type 2 diabetes and risk of breast cancer and the available evidence on the role of hormonal mediators of an association between diabetes and breast cancer. The combined evidence supports a modest association between type 2 diabetes and the risk of breast cancer, which appears to be more consistent among postmenopausal than among premenopausal women. Despite many pro Continue reading >>

The Little-known Connection Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The Little-known Connection Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The Little-Known Connection between Diabetes and Breast Cancer In a hurry? Click here to read the Article Summary... Diabetes, especially lifestyle and diet-related Type 2 Diabetes, has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. And sadly not just for adults, but for children and teens as well. This is not breaking news. Still, the statistics can be scary. Close to 10% of the U.S population have been diagnosed with the disease and an estimated additional8.1 million Americans went undiagnosed in 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control. This includes close to 4,000 new cases of Childhood Type 2 Diabetes each year (something that was unheard of just 15 years ago). And these statistics do not even include the 40% of Americans who, according to the CDC, may be deemed pre-diabetic. The Connection Between Diabetes and Cancer Is Real A study of close to one million people registered with the national Diabetes Service Scheme (NDSS) in Australia who were diagnosed between the years 1997 to 2008 discovered that there were high correlations was between Type 2 Diabetes and cancer. Specifically, these include pancreatic, liver, endometrium, kidney, thyroid and gallbladder cancer as well as certain kinds of leukemia. A 2014 report by the World Journal of Diabetes found that high correlationalso existed between Type 2 Diabetes and breast cancer as well. Increasing rates of both diabetes and cancer over the last decade has led scientists to try to determine the specific chemical and biological connections between the two diseases. For years, conventional wisdom stated that obesity was the common cause. Now more evidence points to factors related to insulin instead. There are a few connections between insulin levels and cancer. First of all, studies have shown that tu Continue reading >>

The Diabetes And Cancer Connection

The Diabetes And Cancer Connection

Diabetic Living / Complications / Other Diabetes can increase your risks for certain cancers. Learn the actions to take now to protect your health. After 20 years of living with type 2 diabetes and a long struggle with her weight, Leila Berner got the diagnosis everyone fears: cancer. Leila, a 63-year-old rabbi who lives near Washington, D.C., never connected her diabetes and breast cancer until her doctors advised that she lose weight and get active for long-term survival. She also underwent a lumpectomy, radiation, and chemotherapy following her 2010 diagnosis. Diabetes and cancer are close cousins, and diabetes is often the first to show up. Researchers have amassed a large knowledge base on the link between diabetes and cancer, says Lesley Fels Tinker, Ph.D., RD, principal staff scientist at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Though questions remain, experts are sure there are several things you can do today to reduce your cancer risks. According to a 2010 consensus report published jointly by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Cancer Society (ACS), the risk of a person with type 2 diabetes developing cancer is 20-50 percent higher than a person without diabetes. Research also indicates that people with type 2 diabetes who develop cancer may experience a shorter life expectancy. That's mainly because of their existing risk or presence of heart disease and/or because many cancer treatments can harm the heart and circulatory system. Being overweight increases the odds of cancer reoccurrence. With diabetes and cancer on the rise and already the second and seventh leading causes, respectively, of death in the United States, health experts are sounding the alarm. "When people gain excess weight, they unlock a cascade of metabolic ch Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The Link Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The link between diabetes and breast cancer The link between diabetes and breast cancer The earliest link between diabetes and cancer was alluded to in the 1930s. However, convincing epidemiological evidence has emerged only recently proving an association between diabetes and cancer. Multiple studies suggest a correlative relationship between diabetes and poor prognosis or increased risk of breast cancer; however, a cause-and-effect relationship is not clear. 16% to 20% of women with breast cancer have diabetes Several factors may contribute to the increased risk of death in diabetic breast cancer patients. These include: delayed cancer diagnosis, suboptimal cancer treatments, direct tumor promoting effects of hyperinsulinemia, and adverse effects of diabetes-related comorbidities or certain antidiabetic medications. Metformin, a widely used antidiabetic medication, was shown to improve the breast cancer treatment response rate in type 2 diabetic patients. Both diabetes and cancer have long preoccupied public health concerns, strained national budgets, and are associated with complications that may affect quality of life. They also share some of the same risk factors, such as age, smoking, weight gain, and a diet poor in fruits and vegetables. The earliest link between diabetes and cancer was alluded to in the 1930s.1,2 However, convincing epidemiological evidence has emerged only recently proving an association between diabetes and cancer.3 The segment of the population affected by diabetes or breast cancer is large. Type 2 diabetes, which includes 90% of all diabetes diagnoses, effect 7% of the adult population, and 15% of people over 60 years of age.4 Breast cancer will affect 1 in 9 women in their lifetime,4 and 16% to 20% of women with breast cancer have diabetes Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes More Likely To Die

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes More Likely To Die

Breast cancer patients are nearly 50 percent more likely to die of any cause if they also have diabetes, according to a comprehensive review of research conducted by Johns Hopkins physicians. The findings, published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, suggest future research could focus on whether high levels of insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes could play a role in promoting tumor growth. The researchers who conducted the review also found that diabetics tend to be diagnosed with later-stage breast cancers and to receive altered and potentially less effective treatment regimens. "When patients are faced with a diagnosis of breast cancer, which they see as an imminent threat to their lives, diabetes care often goes on the back burner," says study leader Kimberly S. Peairs, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "This research suggests we may need to proactively treat the diabetes as well as the cancer," she adds, noting that diabetes is a systemic disease that has many different effects on the body. Peairs and her team conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of previously published research on breast cancer and diabetes, ultimately looking in depth at eight studies. In six of seven studies of breast cancer patients, preexisting diabetes was associated with significantly higher long-term all-cause mortality. Diabetes and cancer are major causes of illness and death worldwide. In 2007, in the United States alone, roughly 24 million people had diabetes (about 8 percent of the population) and 2.5 million were survivors of breast cancer. Diabetics are known to have a higher risk of breast cancer, Peairs says. Peairs says her research suggests that diabetics diagnosed with breast cancer Continue reading >>

The Relation Of Type 2 Diabetes And Breast Cancer Incidence In Asian, Hispanicand African American Populations-a Review.

The Relation Of Type 2 Diabetes And Breast Cancer Incidence In Asian, Hispanicand African American Populations-a Review.

1. Can J Diabetes. 2018 Feb;42(1):100-105. doi: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2017.02.005. Epub2017 May 12. The Relation of Type 2 Diabetes and Breast Cancer Incidence in Asian, Hispanicand African American Populations-A Review. Maskarinec G(1), Fontaine A(2), Torfadottir JE(3), Lipscombe LL(4), Lega IC(4),Figueroa J(5), Wild S(5). (1)Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] (2)Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States. (3)Centre of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. (4)Women's College Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (5)Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. In addition to rising type 2 diabetes and breast cancer incidence ratesworldwide, diabetes may also increase breast cancer risk, and the association mayvary by ethnicity. This review summarizes published data evaluating theassociation between diabetes and breast cancer in women of Asian, Hispanic andAfrican American ancestry while considering a measure of obesity, body mass index(BMI). Published reports were identified through a search of PubMed and previous publications. Of 15 age-adjusted studies, 11 reported on Asian women from variouscountries, 3 on Hispanics and 1 on African Americans. The studies of Asian women described significant associations in 8 reports, with risk estimates of 1.5 to8.4, but 3 were case-control studies and 6 did not adjust for BMI. The 3case-control studies of Hispanic people included BMI, but only 1 detected a weak association between diabetes and breast cancer risk and was limited topostmenopausal Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer And Diabetes

Breast Cancer And Diabetes

Breast cancer can affect men as well as women Breast cancer is a common form of cancer - the most common cancer in women - that develops inside the tissue of the breast. This sectionexplains how breast cancer, which can also occur in men, is linked to diabetes in addition to what the commonrisk factors and symptoms of breast cancer are and how the disease is treated. Breast cancer refers to cancer - the uncontrollable growth and spread of new cells - that originates from breast tissue. As cancer can develop in different parts of the breast, there are various different types of breast cancer. Some remain inside the breast and are known as non-invasive breast cancers (or carcinoma in situ), while most have the ability to spread outside the breast and are commonly referred to as invasive breast cancer. The most common type of non-invasive cancer is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), or cancer found in the milk ducts of the breast. The most common form of breast cancer is invasive ductal breast cancer, which develops in the cells that line the breast ducts. It accounts for around 80% of all cases of breast cancer. Other less common types of breast cancer include: Invasive lobular breast cancer - develops in the inner lining of the milk-producing glands of the breast (lobules) Inflammatory breast cancer - a rare and very aggressive cancer in which affected cells block lymph vessels in the skin of the breast, causing it to swell Paget's disease of the breast - an infiltrating cancer of the cells that line that nipple Secondary or metastatic breast cancer - cancer that spreads from the breast to other parts of the body, usually through the bloodstream or the lymph nodes (small glands that filter bacteria) In the UK, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the secon Continue reading >>

Association Between Diabetes Mellitus And Breast Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis Of The Literature.

Association Between Diabetes Mellitus And Breast Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis Of The Literature.

Association between diabetes mellitus and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of the literature. Department of Thyroid and Breast Surgery, Renmin Hospital, Wuhan, China. Diabetes and breast cancer are both serious life-threatening diseases across the world. Some studies shows that diabetes is associated with many kinds of tumor, but links with breast cancer remain controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the association the available evidence. A meta-analysis was conducted including 16 studies published between 2000 and 2010 and summary relative risks(RRs) with 95% CIs were calculated using random-effects model. The combined evidence supports that diabetes was associated with a statistically significant 23% increased risk of breast cancer, especially in postmenopausal women (RR=1.25 95%CI 1.20-1.29). The correlation between diabetes and breast cancer was the most obvious in Europe (RR=1.88,95%CI:1.56-2.25), followed by America (RR=1.16, 95%CI:1.12-1.20). In Asia the result was not significant (RR=1.01, 95%CI=0.84-1.21). Diabetes also increased mortality from breast cancer overall (RR=1.44, 95%CI:1.31-1.58). This meta-analysis indicated that diabetes can be considered as a risk factor for breast cancer. In addition, menstruation status as well as geographical distribution can affect the relationship. Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What is the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes? Survivors of breast cancer, who are post-menopausal, have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Scientists are becoming increasingly aware of an association between diabetes and cancer. In this article, we discuss the link. A study, published in Diabetologia, is the largest to observe the link between surviving breast cancer and eventually developing diabetes; it also showed that whether the patient went on to develop diabetes was closely associated with having undergone chemotherapy . The opposite interaction has also been observed: females with diabetes have a 20 percent chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. A study from last year demonstrated that people with diabetes over the age of 60 are more likely to develop breast cancer, compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Fast facts on breast cancer and diabetes: It has been observed that having diabetes increases the likelihood of breast cancer, and that having breast cancer increases the likelihood of developing diabetes. Lifestyle changes can help reduce risk long-term. How has the connection between breast cancer and diabetes been established? There has been increased study into the correlation of breast cancer and diabetes. The connection has been made as a result of improvements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As more women survive breast cancer, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term outcomes for survivors as they grow older. However, few studies have tried to determine what the risk of developing diabetes is for a breast cancer survivor. The study in Diabetalogia is an example of the new research that has established the connection between breast cancer and diabetes more firmly. The team, Continue reading >>

Study Suggests Link Between Diabetes, More Advanced-stage Breast Cancer

Study Suggests Link Between Diabetes, More Advanced-stage Breast Cancer

Home Research News Study Suggests Link Between Diabetes, More Advanced-Stage Breast Cancer Study Suggests Link Between Diabetes, More Advanced-Stage Breast Cancer Several previous studies have found that women diagnosed with diabetes were more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who arent diabetic. Now a Canadian study suggests that if diabetic women are diagnosed with breast cancer, it is more likely to be advanced-stage disease. The study was published in the March 2015 issue of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. Read the abstract of The association between diabetes and breast cancer stage at diagnosis: a population-based study. The researchers looked at the medical records of 38,407 women from Ontario, Canada, who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 2007 and 2012; 6,115 (15.9%) of the women were diabetic. The women were 20 to 105 years old. The researchers found that women with diabetes were: 14% more likely to have stage II breast cancer 21% more likely to have stage III breast cancer 16% more likely to have stage IV breast cancer rather than stage I breast cancer at diagnosis. These differences in stage at diagnosis were statistically significant, which means theyre likely because the women had diabetes rather than just due to chance. Compared to women who didnt have diabetes, women with diabetes also: had a higher risk of the cancer spreading to the lymph nodes The researchers suggested that breast cancer screening may need to be more aggressive for women with diabetes so that if any cancer develops it is found at an earlier stage. A more aggressive screening plan may include screenings every 6 to 12 months -- possibly an annual mammogram and an annual breast MRI or ultrasound. Its not clear why women with diabetes may have a higher risk Continue reading >>

Connection Between Diabetes, Advanced Breast Cancer Detected In Study Webmd

Connection Between Diabetes, Advanced Breast Cancer Detected In Study Webmd

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with diabetes may have an increased risk of being diagnosed with advanced breast cancer , a new study from Canada shows. "Our findings suggest that women with diabetes may be predisposed to more advanced-stage breast cancer , which may be a contributor to their higher cancer mortality," Dr. Lorraine Lipscombe, a scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and Women's College Hospital in Toronto, said in a hospital news release. She and her colleagues said that breast cancer screening and detection methods may need to be modified for women with diabetes in order to reduce their risk of being diagnosed with advanced cancer. The researchers analyzed data from more than 38,000 women ages 20 to 105 who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2007 and 2012. Nearly 16 percent of the women had diabetes. Women with diabetes were 14 percent more likely to have stage II breast cancer, 21 percent more likely to have stage III breast cancer, and 16 percent more likely to be have stage IV breast cancer, compared to having stage I breast cancer, which is the most treatable stage. Five-year survival for breast cancer patients with diabetes was 15 percent lower than for those without diabetes, according to the study published March 24 in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. The researchers also found that breast cancer patients with diabetes were more likely to have larger tumors and cancer that had spread, compared to those without diabetes. The study revealed lower mammogram rates in women with diabetes, which could account for later-stage disease, the researchers said. Researchers only found an association between diabetes and advanced breast cancer in this study, not a cause-and-effect link. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Breast Cancer – Same Root Cause?

Type 2 Diabetes And Breast Cancer – Same Root Cause?

November is National Diabetes Month. According to 2017 statistics, about 10% of the American population suffers from the condition.Similar to cancer, the number of people diagnosed with this often-debilitating condition is rising every year. Type 2 Diabetes is caused mostly by poor lifestyle and dietary choices. This means that both can possibly be prevented through incorporating simple changes into your day-today routine. What is Type 2 Diabetes? Insulin is a hormonal substance made by the pancreas which helps convert food to energy. When a person has diabetes, the body is not able to make enough insulin for this conversion to take place efficiently. Glucose stays in the bloodstream, and this is when problems begin to occur. Unlike Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes is usually discovered in people over age 30 and is largely related to lifestyle and dietary choices. The Undeniable Diabetes – Breast Cancer Connection I have written extensively about cancer’s connection to glucose. In a nutshell, cancer cells love sugar. In fact, cancer cells have been shown to have 44 times more cellular receptors for sugar than healthy cells do. This may partially explain why studies have shown a direct connection between diabetes and many kinds of cancer. In fact, a joint US-Canadian study of 600 post-menopausal breast cancer patients found a definite connection between high insulin levels, obesity and higher incidence of the dis-ease. The other connection between diabetes and cancer has to do with Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1), a hormonal substance produced by the liver. IGF-1’s main job is to promote cell growth. While IGF-1 is vital for early childhood development, too much of it can be dangerous for adults. A 2014 report published in the International Journal of Cancer f Continue reading >>

Does Type 2 Diabetes Increase The Risk Of Breast Cancer? | Food For Breast Cancer

Does Type 2 Diabetes Increase The Risk Of Breast Cancer? | Food For Breast Cancer

Does type 2 diabetes increase the risk of breast cancer? Type 2 diabetes has been reported to increase the risk of breast cancer, especially in postmenopausal women. Many women with type 2 diabetes are obese , which also increases risk among postmenopausal women. However, type 2 diabetes increases breast cancer risk even in normal weight women. Women with type 2 diabetes also tend to be diagnosed with breast cancer at later stages than non-diabetics. Type 1 diabetes does not appear to be associated with increased risk. Circulating insulin appears to be an important factor common to both type 2 diabetes and obesity. High levels of circulating insulin (hyperinsulinemia) appear to promote breast cancer both indirectly and directly by acting as a growth promoter. Production and metabolism of insulin-like growth factors are also disturbed in diabetics, and may contribute to increased cancer risk and progression. Women with metabolic syndrome are more likely to have triple negative breast cancer upon diagnosis than women without it. The combination of high total cholesterol and type 2 diabetes appears to be more potentially harmful than either condition alone. High-density lipoprotein (HDL, the "good" cholesterol) from breast cancer patients with type 2 diabetes has been shown to promote one of the first steps in metastasis in cell and animal studies. Hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance , and diabetes have all been found to be associated with poor breast cancer outcomes. High levels of fasting glucose at diagnosis have also been found to be associated with increased risk of recurrence compared to normal levels. One large Finnish study reported that the risk of breast cancer-specific death was 36% higher among women with diabetes compared to those without diabetes. Women wit Continue reading >>

Association Between Diabetes Mellitus And Adverse Characteristics Of Breast Cancer At Presentation

Association Between Diabetes Mellitus And Adverse Characteristics Of Breast Cancer At Presentation

Volume 42, Issue 8 , May 2006, Pages 1077-1082 Association between diabetes mellitus and adverse characteristics of breast cancer at presentation Author links open overlay panel IdoWolfad Get rights and content Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased incidence and inferior outcome of various malignancies. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of type 2 diabetes on breast cancer characteristics at presentation. The study population included 79 diabetic and 158 age-matched non-diabetic patients. Parity, country of birth, co-morbidity other than diabetes, and mode of diagnosis were similar in both groups. Mean body mass index (BMI) was higher among diabetic patients. Tumour stage and size were higher among diabetic patients and the differences remained significant after adjustment for BMI. Moreover, after adjustment for BMI, breast cancer among diabetic patients was more often hormone receptor negative. Our results show that diabetes mellitus is associated with negative prognostic factors at breast cancer presentation. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

When Michelle Hall was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago, she was shocked. "The standing joke in the family was that I came from a long line of stocky French women who lived forever," says Hall, 62, of Salem, N.H. "We had no breast cancer in the family." Hall had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2001, so she would have special challenges while facing down cancer. As diseases, cancer and diabetes seem a world away from each other. Yet, numerous studies suggest the conditions are linked. People with diabetes are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than those without diabetes, but why remains unclear. Scientists are still trying to answer even the most basic questions: Does diabetes cause cancer? If so, what kinds of cancer and how? As the interplay between diabetes and cancer becomes clearer, researchers hope to gain an edge against both diseases. The link between diabetes and cancer may be partially explained by risk factors that underlie and raise the risk of both diseases. Sex: Overall, men are more likely to develop both cancer and type 2 diabetes than women. Weight: Overweight and obese people are more likely to develop cancer than lean people. The association between type 2 diabetes and weight is also well established. While it's clear that losing weight reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes, less is known about whether weight loss combats cancer. Diet: Eating patterns that are thought to help prevent and treat type 2 diabeteslimited red and processed meats and abundant vegetables, fruits, and whole grainsare also associated with a lower risk for many types of cancer. Exercise: Studies show that regular physical activity lowers the risk of developing several types of cancer. Likewise, 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per day can reduce th Continue reading >>

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