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Related Conditions To Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Type 2 diabetes is more common in people who don't do enough physical activity, and who are overweight or obese. Type 2 diabetes can often be prevented or delayed with early lifestyle changes, however there is no cure. Common symptoms include being more thirsty than usual, passing more urine, feeling tired and lethargic, slow-healing wounds, itching and skin infections and blurred vision. People with pre-diabetes can reduce their risk of developing diabetes by increasing their physical activity, eating healthily and losing weight (if they are overweight). On this page: Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. The body uses glucose as its main source of energy. Glucose comes from foods that contain carbohydrates, such as potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is released and absorbed into the bloodstream. The glucose in the bloodstream needs to move into body tissues so that cells can use it for energy. Excess glucose is stored in the liver, or converted to fat and stored in other body tissues. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, which is a gland located just below the stomach. Insulin opens the doors (the glucose channels) that let glucose move from the blood into the body cells. It also allows glucose to be stored in the liver and other tissues. This is part of a process known as glucose metabolism. There are two main types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the body's immune cells attack the insulin-producing cells. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin and need insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and affects 85 to 90 per cent of all people with diabet Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that's characterized by high blood sugar, which doctors refer to as hyperglycemia. In type 2 diabetes, the two main contributors to high blood sugar are insulin resistance and a drop in your body's production of insulin. These two factors are what makes type 2 diabetes different from type 1 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and other types of diabetes. What Is Insulin Resistance? Insulin — the hormone that allows your body to regulate sugar in the blood — is made in your pancreas. Insulin resistance is a state in which the body’s cells do not use insulin efficiently. As a result, it takes more insulin than normal to transport glucose (the main type of sugar found in the bloodstream) into cells, where it can be used for fuel or stored for later use. Insulin resistance develops over time, and as the body becomes more and more insulin resistant, the pancreas responds by releasing more and more insulin. This higher-than-normal level of insulin in the bloodstream is called hyperinsulinemia. For a while, the pancreas may be able to keep up with the body’s increased need for insulin, and blood sugar levels may stay within the normal range — about 70 to 100 mg/dl before meals and lower than 140 mg/dl after meals. Eventually, however, the pancreas can no longer keep up, and blood sugar levels begin to rise. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? It's not known for certain why some people develop type 2 diabetes and some do not. There are several factors, however, that can increase a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes: Obesity Being obese or overweight puts you at significant risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Four out of five people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Prediabetes Prediabetes is a condition in which your blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects your body’s use of glucose (a type of sugar you make from the carbohydrates you eat). Glucose is the fuel your cells need to do their work. You need glucose for energy. You also need insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose enter your cells so that it can be converted to energy. Here’s the problem: People with type 2 diabetes (also known as diabetes mellitus) can’t properly use or store glucose, either because their cells resist it or, in some cases, they don’t make enough. Over time, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, which can lead to serious health complications unless people take steps to manage their blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes affects more than 29 million Americans, including nearly eight million who don’t even know they have it. You may be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes if it runs in your family, if you are of a certain age or ethnicity, or if you are inactive or overweight. Type 2 diabetes vs. type 1 diabetes What’s the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce insulin. The immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need life-long insulin therapy. Type 2 diabetes is much more common. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin properly or, in some cases, doesn’t make enough. It’s usually diagnosed in middle-aged or older adults, but anyone can develop type 2 diabetes. It can be managed through diet, exercise, and medication. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t use insulin as it should or when the pancreas doesn Continue reading >>

The 7 Most Common Diabetes-related Medical Emergencies

The 7 Most Common Diabetes-related Medical Emergencies

Rapid treatment is crucial if you're experiencing stroke symptoms.(ISTOCK)Type 2 diabetes can damage blood vessels and nerves, so just about every part of your body can be affected by the disease. Diabetes care generally focuses on day-to-day living to prevent complications, such as eating right and exercising, but it's also important for you to know how to get help if you have one of these medical emergencies. Controlling your blood sugar can lower the chances of all of the following emergencies (with the exception of hypoglycemia). You should also keep an eye on your cholesterol and blood pressure to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. Amputation Tell your doctor right away if you notice any foot injuries, no matter how small, because they can rapidly lead to amputation. You may be referred to a hospital if your condition is serious. Some hospitals and centers now have "limb salvage" programs to help you keep your feet, such as New York University Medical Center; the Wisconsin Heart Hospital outside of Milwaukee; Riverside Methodist Hospital in Columbus, Ohio; and University Foot & Ankle Institute at various locations in California. Ask your doctor where you can find the best foot-saving expertise in your area. Heart attack The death rate from heart disease is two to four times higher in adults who have diabetes than those without it. You should be aware of heart attack symptoms, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and nausea; call 911 immediately if you experience them. Next Page: Hyperglycemia [ pagebreak ]Diabetes ComaIgnoring diabetes symptoms is risky Watch videoMore about diabetes complications Hyperglycemia High blood sugar can result from not taking enough insulin, eating too much, or being sick or stressed. Symptoms include excessive thirst, exce Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes. Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. It's very important for it to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Complications of type 2 diabetes Diabetes can cause serious long-term heal Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

With type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus), if you don’t work hard to keep your blood glucose level under control, there are short- and long-term complications to contend with. However, by watching the amount and types of food you eat (your meal plan), exercising, and taking any necessary medications, you may be able to prevent these complications. And even if you have some of the long-term, more serious complications discussed below when you’re first diagnosed, getting tight control of your blood glucose will help prevent the complications from becoming worse. (It is possible with type 2 diabetes to already have some of these complications when you’re first diagnosed. That’s because type 2 develops gradually, and you may not realize that you have high blood glucose for quite some time. Over time, high blood glucose can cause serious damage. You can learn more about that in this article on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.) Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It is possible for your blood glucose to drop, especially if you’re taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug (those make your body produce insulin throughout the day). With these medications, if you eat less than usual or were more active, your blood glucose may dip too much. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and too much alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). Rapid heartbeat Sweating Whiteness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech Mild cases of hypoglycemia can be treated by drinking orange juice or eating a glucose tablet—those will quickly rai Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health: Conditions And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health: Conditions And Treatment

Skin complications usually occur when blood sugar levels are too high, and they are often the first visible sign of diabetes. An estimated one-third of people with diabetes experience skin conditions either related to or influenced by the condition. Medication options exist, but managing blood sugars is normally the best prevention and treatment option. How does type 2 diabetes affect skin health? When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, several changes take place in the body that affect skin health. Blood sugar is removed from the body through the urine. When there is excess blood sugar, the rate of urination increases, which can cause dehydration and dry skin. High blood sugar levels can also lead to inflammation, which over time dulls or overstimulates the immune response. High blood sugar levels can also cause nerve and blood vessel damage, reducing circulation. Poor blood flow can alter the skin's structure, especially its collagen. Without healthy collagen networks, the skin can become stiff and in some cases brittle. Collagen is also necessary for proper wound healing. Skin conditions associated with type 2 diabetes Several skin conditions are associated with high or uncontrolled blood sugar levels. While most skin complications associated with diabetes are harmless, the symptoms of some can be painful, persistent, and they may require medical attention. The best and easiest treatment option for most diabetes-related skin conditions is managing blood sugar levels. In severe cases, however, oral steroids or medicated creams may be used. Common skin conditions associated with type 2 diabetes include the following: Acanthosis nigricans This condition is marked by a darkened band of velvety skin, especially in the folds near the groin, back of the neck, or Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

Southern Cross Medical Library Southern Cross Medical Library information is necessarily of a general nature. Always seek specific medical advice for treatment appropriate to you. For more articles go to the Medical Library index page. Diabetes is diagnosed when a person has too much glucose (sugar) in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is a life-long variation of the disease often associated with being overweight, and is the result of the body not producing enough insulin and/or being unable to respond to insulin. Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes develop gradually. The condition can cause serious health complications over time but can be managed with lifestyle changes and medication. General information Diabetes mellitus (commonly known as diabetes) is a group of diseases characterised by high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period of time. This page deals with type 2 diabetes. Other variations of diabetes include: Type 1 diabetes – usually diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. Gestational diabetes – where a mother cannot produce enough insulin during pregnancy. Almost 7% of adult New Zealanders, or approximately 200,000 people, have type 2 diabetes. The condition is more common among Māori, Pacifica, and Asian people than in European New Zealanders. Type 2 diabetes used to be known as adult-onset diabetes and most often occurs in adulthood. It is increasingly being diagnosed in children and adolescents, which may be related to an increasing prevalence of obesity. Causes Type 2 diabetes develops when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin and/or when the pancreas gland stops producing enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that promotes the uptake of glucose from the blood into cells so that it can be metabolised (broken down) and used by the body as an energy Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Complications: Heart Disease, Diabetic Retinopathy, Neuropathy, And More | Everyday Health

Type 2 Diabetes Complications: Heart Disease, Diabetic Retinopathy, Neuropathy, And More | Everyday Health

Do you know your risk for diabetes complications? Talking with your healthcare provider can help you take steps to prevent diabetes from progressing to other health problems. If you have type 2 diabetes, you already know that smart medication, diet, and lifestyle choices can help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels and enjoy an excellent quality of life. But in some cases, despite our best efforts to manage the disease, issues can arise and that risk may increase with age. ( 1 ) Warding off the serious and sometimes fatal health complications linked with type 2 diabetes starts with being aware of their potential. Then its important to take steps to decrease their risk. What Causes Health Complications of Diabetes? Even though your body needs sugar for energy, too much sugar can be a bad thing. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your blood sugar level remains consistently high due to a condition called insulin resistance . ( 2 ) During digestion, your body converts carbohydrates into sugar, and then your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin to help this sugar absorb into your cells. But due to insulin resistance, your body doesnt use insulin properly, which forces your pancreas to work harder to produce enough insulin to meet your bodys needs. (2) RELATED: Everything You Need to Know About Insulin if You Have Type 2 Diabetes Hyperglycemia occurs when your pancreas cant keep up and your blood sugar rises to an unhealthy level. Persistent hyperglycemia can lead to diabetes complications because too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause tissue, organ, and nerve damage, and weaken the immune system. ( 3 ) Hyperglycemia can develop gradually over days or weeks, and symptoms include frequent urination, increased thirst, fatigue, headache, and blurry vision. (3) Risk Fact Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes mellitus type 2 (also known as type 2 diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.[6] Common symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, and unexplained weight loss.[3] Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness, kidney failure, and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations.[1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may occur; however, ketoacidosis is uncommon.[4][5] Type 2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and lack of exercise.[1] Some people are more genetically at risk than others.[6] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes, with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes.[1] In diabetes mellitus type 1 there is a lower total level of insulin to control blood glucose, due to an autoimmune induced loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.[12][13] Diagnosis of diabetes is by blood tests such as fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, or glycated hemoglobin (A1C).[3] Type 2 diabetes is partly preventable by staying a normal weight, exercising regularly, and eating properly.[1] Treatment involves exercise and dietary changes.[1] If blood sugar levels are not adequately lowered, the medication metformin is typically recommended.[7][14] Many people may eventually also require insulin injections.[9] In those on insulin, routinely checking blood sugar levels is advised; however, this may not be needed in those taking pills.[15] Bariatri Continue reading >>

5 Health Conditions That Are Caused By Diabetes

5 Health Conditions That Are Caused By Diabetes

Source: Web exclusive: May 2011 If you’ve got diabetes, that’s not the only disease you should be concerned about. Diabetes is linked to a host of other health problems. But it’s not all doom and gloom, since there are ways to reduce your risk. Number one is blood glucose control. "If you can control your diabetes, then your risk of developing those complications and secondary conditions goes down," says Karen McDermaid, a diabetes educator in Moosomin, Saskatchewan. These five conditions are the big ones to look out for if you’re prediabetic or have diabetes. 1. Heart disease and stroke Cardiovascular disease is the leading causing of death for people who have diabetes. That’s because high blood sugar can cause a gradual buildup of fatty deposits that clog and harden the walls of blood vessels. And when blood vessels are partially blocked or narrowed, it can lead to a stroke or heart attack. Not everyone faces the same risk. You’re more likely to have cardiovascular disease if you’ve been living with diabetes for more than 15 years. Same applies if you’ve already had diabetes complications affecting your eyes, kidneys or nerves, or if you’ve noticed problems with circulation, like chest pain when you’re physically active, or leg pain when you spend time walking. Cardiovascular risk factors for people without diabetes also apply to you: If you smoke, have high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels, or have close relatives who have had heart attacks or stroke, your odds are higher of developing the disease. Reduce your risk: If you smoke, quit. Increase your level of regular physical exercise. And stick to a well-balanced, heart-healthy diet. 2. Kidney disease Diabetes is a leading cause of kidney failure. At least half of all people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Related Conditions

Diabetes Related Conditions

Nerve Pain and Diabetes Nerve pain caused by diabetes, known as diabetic peripheral neuropathy, can be severe, constant, and hard to treat. Controlling your blood sugar can make a big difference. Eye Problems and Diabetes Diabetes can increase your risk of eye problems. See common diabetes-related eye ailments and what treatments are available. Skin Conditions and Diabetes Skin conditions related to this disease are common. Fortunately, most can be successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Kidney Disease and Diabetes Diabetic nephropathy -- kidney disease that results from diabetes -- is the No. 1 cause of kidney failure. Learn the symptoms, how it's diagnosed, and how to treat it. Infections and Diabetes Most infections in people with diabetes can be treated. But you have to be able to spot the symptoms. Learn what to look for. Heart Disease and Diabetes Having diabetes makes heart disease more likely. Learn more about the link and how to lower your risk. Depression and Diabetes Learn about the link between diabetes and depression, how to spot symptoms of depression, how to treat it, and more. Smoking and Diabetes Smoking is bad for everyone, and it's especially risky if you have diabetes. Here are 14 tips to help you quit. Colds and Diabetes If you have diabetes, catching colds can make your condition worse. Here's what you can do to stay well. Diabetic Macular Edema Learn the causes, symptoms, and treatment of diabetic macular edema, an eye condition brought on by diabetes. Meralgia Paresthetica Starting a family requires a bit more planning when you're a mother-to-be with diabetes. But you can take some simple steps to make sure your pregnancy and your baby are safe and healthy. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Introduction Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin This topic is about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk Read more about the symptoms of type 2 diabetes It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Read about the causes and risk factors for type 2 diabetes Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Read mor Continue reading >>

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