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Why The Paleo Diet Is Good For Type 1 Diabetes

Why The Paleo Diet Is Good For Type 1 Diabetes

Note: By providing a place for the community to share real life experiences we hope you find inspiration and new ways of thinking about management. We encourage you to approach these offerings as you would a buffet — review the options, maybe try a few new things and come back for what works best for you. Bon Appetit! Check out our library of resources on Food. To me, the term “Paleo” is not a diet or a fad but rather a framework — a framework for building a healthy lifestyle centered around real food, food that is un-refined and un-processed, just as nature intended it to be. Eating real food doesn’t have to be complicated or flavorless, quite the opposite in fact! The basis of the Paleo diet eliminates grains, gluten (even corn and oats), hydrogenated oils, refined animal dairy products, refined sugars, soy and preservatives. Now, that may sound like a lot of foods and you are probably wondering well what do I even eat then?! I prefer to focus on the foods I can eat and enjoy rather than those that I can’t and trust me, there are endless foods, flavors, textures and colors that you can eat! Personally, I believe that everyone can benefit from the framework of the Paleo diet, but personalization is key. Some people will need more good quality sources of carbohydrates depending on their activity level and some people like me do really well incorporating high quality dairy items. Keep in mind that diet is a foundation but not everything when it comes to staying healthy with Type 1 diabetes and other lifestyle factors such as stress, sleep and emotions play a huge role in managing blood sugar. Paleo friendly foods are rich in nutrients, keeping you satisfied and your blood sugar stable. When we remove processed foods and refined carbohydrates we lower the amou Continue reading >>

Texas Researchers Cure Diabetes In Mice

Texas Researchers Cure Diabetes In Mice

Researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have cured Type 1 diabetes in mice without side effects. The treatment would also allow people with Type 2 diabetes to stop insulin shots. Diabetes is classified as either Type 1 or Type 2. Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong autoimmune condition that develops when the beta-cells — the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin — are destroyed, causing a person's blood sugar level to become too high. Type 2 diabetics produce insulin, but can't properly use the insulin they produce. The majority of people who have diabetes have Type 2, and obesity caused by overeating is generally recognized as the major cause. The new discovery increases the number of pancreatic cells that secrete insulin. "It worked perfectly," said Bruno Doir, Ph.D, co-inventor of the technique. "We cured mice for one year without any side effects. That's never been seen. But it's a mouse model, so caution is needed. We want to bring this to large animals that are closer to humans in physiology of the endocrine system." "The pancreas has many other cell types besides beta cells, and our approach is to alter these cells so that they start to secrete insulin, but only in response to glucose [sugar]," said Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., the other co-inventor of the technique. "This is basically just like beta cells." The therapy uses a technique called gene transfer. A virus is used as a vector, or carrier, to introduce selected genes into the pancreas. These genes become incorporated into the organ and cause digestive enzymes and other cell types to make insulin. Gene transfer using a viral vector has been approved nearly 50 times by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to treat various diseases, said DeFronzo, and is a proven treatment for Continue reading >>

San Antonio Scientists Trick The Body Into Curing Diabetes In Mice

San Antonio Scientists Trick The Body Into Curing Diabetes In Mice

SAN ANTONIO – Researchers in San Antonio have cured diabetes in mice, and they say all it takes is playing a trick on the body. UT Health Science Center at San Antonio biologists Dr. Ralph DeFronzo and Dr. Bruno Doiron found a way to not only ‘wake up’ and program cells in the pancreas to create insulin, but also to do it at the correct levels for what the body needs. “We’re taking a cell that is already present in the body — it’s there, and it’s happy — and programming it to secrete insulin, without changing it otherwise,” DeFronzo told mystatesman.com. The pair injected mice with a virus to deliver a ‘gene transfer’ — a technique common with other diseases but unconventional in diabetes research — which kick-started the pancreas into using cells the body already has. The virus allows the cells to “wake up” and produce insulin. And ta-da, diabetes cures itself. At least in mice. The research is expected to have a big impact on both Type 1 (juvenile) diabetes and Type 2 (adult onset) diabetes. People with diabetes have trouble with insulin, which processing carbohydrates (breads, potatoes, chips, candy bars) and their bodies don’t monitor blood sugar levels properly. This can lead to heart attack, stroke, vision problems and blindness, and poor circulation in the feet and legs — which sometimes leads to amputations. The body of a Type 1 diabetic, which is found most often in children, kills off the cells which produce insulin; these are the diabetics DeFronzo and Doiron focused on in their study, although their findings are expected to impact both types of the disease. Type 2 diabetics do produce insulin but their cells reject it, which starves the cells and causes insulin to build up in the bloodstream. The majority of diabetics are Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms Reddit

Diabetes Symptoms Reddit

Please note: THE DATA Diabetes Symptoms Reddit ON MAY BE FOR EDUCATIONAL AS WELL AS INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS ONLY AND IS ALSO NOT AN ALTERNATIVE FOR HEALTH CARE ADVICE, DIAGNOSIS OR MAYBE TREATMENT. CHECK ALONG WITH YOUR DOCTOR OR MAYBE OTHER PROFESSIONAL ADVISOR BEFORE USING THIS INFORMATION. Thanks for perusing this article related to Diabetes Symptoms Reddit. These symptoms regarding diabetes happen to be typical. However, some people with type 2 diabetes have got symptoms consequently mild how they go unseen. Related Image Of Diabetes Symptoms Reddit Urinating normally Feeling rather thirsty Feeling quite hungry - even if you are enjoying Extreme exhaustion Blurry idea Cuts/bruises which are slow to heal Weight decline - although you may are taking in more (type 1) Tingling, pain, or numbness during the hands/feet (sort 2). Premature detection plus treatment for diabetes can certainly decrease chance of getting the troubles of diabetes. [pgp_tite] Diagnosing Diabetes and Understading about Prediabetes. There are lots of ways that will diagnose diabetes. Each means usually needs to be repeated for a second day to make out diabetes. Testing must be carried out from a health consideration setting (which include your doctor’s office or perhaps a lab). If your physician determines that a blood carbohydrates level is very high, or if you have classic signs or symptoms of high blood glucose besides one positive test, your doctor might not exactly require an alternate test to diagnose diabetes. Related Image Of Diabetes Symptoms Reddit A1C The A1C test out measures a person's average blood glucose for days gone by 2 to 3 months. The aspects of being diagnosed with this are that you won't have to fast or drink something. Diabetes is usually diagnosed on an A1C in excess of Continue reading >>

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

Dreaming of a cure for diabetes: Fact or Fiction? With tears in her eyes but a faint smile, Camp Director Maura Prescott, approached the podium. I would like to say that I am overjoyed that we are closing our Diabetes Camp with the announcement from the CDC that Type 1 Diabetes has now been eradicated, and that the services of our camp are no longer needed. I look forward to continuing to work in the diabetes world, but with the older Type 2 population, helping to fine tune their diabetes control with the Bionic Pancreas and increase their quality of life and time on this earth. I have given my life to working with and improving the lives of those with diabetes, and I will continue to do so. By the end of my life, I hope to see that there is not one single person with diabetes on this planet, and that our children and grandchildren are taught about this debilitating chronic illness in history class. We have come so far since the 1920’s, where we saw the discovery of insulin. We have come to the point of cure. Here, in 2056, we can say that on the horizon, we can see a world without diabetes. I stand before you today in awe at the shear genius of scientists who have worked tirelessly in efforts to make this day come. From the introduction of the vaccine for Type 1 diabetes in 2032, we have seen worldwide eradication similar to that seen many years ago with polio. The camp closes because there are no more children with diabetes to attend it, and is that not what we have all been working for? Honestly, I never expected to be able to say those words in my lifetime. But here we are. Tania Prescott read the scribbled notes from her mother’s speech some 25 years before. She had just read a news article online explaining how there are now only a few people left on the earth Continue reading >>

The Pathogenesis And Natural History Of Type 1 Diabetes

The Pathogenesis And Natural History Of Type 1 Diabetes

Abstract The purpose of this article is to provide an overview that summarizes much in the way of our current state of knowledge regarding the pathogenesis and natural history of type 1 diabetes in humans. This information is presented to the reader as a series of seminal historical discoveries that, when advanced through research, transformed our understanding of the roles for the immune system, genes, and environment in the formation of this disease. In addition, where longitudinal investigations of these three facets occurred, their roles within the development of type 1 diabetes, from birth to symptomatic onset and beyond, are discussed, including their most controversial elements. Having an understanding of this disorder’s pathogenesis and natural history is key for attempts seeking to understand the issues of what causes type 1 diabetes, as well as to develop a means to prevent and cure the disorder. Continue reading >>

Stabilizing Diabetes: Old Drug Could Help Millions

Stabilizing Diabetes: Old Drug Could Help Millions

Dr. Denise L. Faustman is testing a cheap “penny vaccine” that could bring hope to millions struggling with Type 1 diabetes. The researcher from Massachusetts General Hospital said BCG — a vaccine used against tuberculosis that’s been around since 1921 — could reverse the deadly effects of the disease. “This offers hope for the first time that people with the long-standing disease will have long-term benefits,” Faustman told the Herald last night. “And to think it’s due to a cheap, 100-year-old generic drug.” The article you requested has been archived All coverage within bostonherald.com from the last 14 days remains free of charge. Articles do not always include original photos, charts or graphics. » Click here to search for this article within the archive. Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Type 1.5 Diabetes: An Overview

Type 1.5 Diabetes: An Overview

Type 1.5 Diabetes (T1.5D) is also known as Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults (LADA). LADA is considered by some experts to be a slowly progressive form of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) while other experts in the field consider it a separate form of Diabetes. LADA or T1.5D is sometimes thought of as T1D that is diagnosed in adults over the age of 30—T1D is commonly diagnosed in children and younger adults. T1.5D is often found along with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D): up to 25% of individuals with T1.5D also have characteristics of T2D.1 This is sometimes called “double diabetes”. Individuals with T1.5D are all eventually dependent on insulin for treatment, and have a very high risk of requiring insulin within months or years (up to six years) after the initial diagnosis. This is in contrast to people with T1D—these people tend to need insulin within days or weeks of diagnosis.2 Individuals diagnosed with T2D relatively rarely require insulin treatment. Current recommendations are to treat individuals with T1.5D immediately with insulin, though this is not universally accepted (see below). The Causes of T1.5D Just as with other forms of diabetes, we don’t truly understand the underlying cause(s) of T1.5D. There are autoimmune components in Types 1, 1.5 and 2 diabetes with some overlap in the types of antibodies formed, so it is clear that as in T1D, the immune system has become “confused” and begins to act against the beta cells of the pancreas—the source of the insulin needed to control blood sugars. Both T1D and T1.5D have antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase or anti-GAD antibodies. As with T1D, individuals with T1.5D tend not to be obese, whereas in T2D, most individuals are overweight or obese. Genetics and Environmental Susceptibility Individuals with T1.5D Continue reading >>

Cbs And Reddit:

Cbs And Reddit:

Recently, Dr. Max Gomez, a medical reporter at CBS 2, the local television affiliate in New York City, came to the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center to do a story on a fascinating scientific breakthrough in type 1 diabetes made in the laboratory of Domenico Accili, MD—that cells in the human intestine can be coaxed to produce insulin. On hand to help Dr Gomez tell the story were Berrie Center Co-Directors Drs. Robin Goland and Rudy Leibel and premed student Eli Bunzel, who has been a patient at the Berrie Center since he was 10 years old. Hear what they all had to say about a discovery that may one day lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. Click here. Meanwhile, on July 23, Dr. Accili, was busy taking questions about diabetes research including his own gut insulin project in an AMA (ask me anything) session on Reddit (read it), a social networking service and user-driven news and entertainment website that is dubbed, “the front page of the Internet.” Dr. Accili joins a long list of noted innovators (including, Bill Gates, Barrack Obama, Al Gore, Renee Fleming, Madonna and Psy, of Gangnam Style fame) who have participated in AMA sessions on Reddit. Click to the CUMC Newsroom to read about Dr. Accili’s research on gut insulin and an edited transcript of his AMA session. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes – The Basics

Type 1 Diabetes – The Basics

Type 1 diabetes used to be called insulin dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes. Over the years this has become confusing as many people with type 2 diabetes eventually need insulin to manage their diabetes and as well, adults can also get type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes never turns into type 1 diabetes – they are very different diseases. In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot produce insulin because the cells that actually make the insulin have been destroyed by the body’s own immune system. The Islets of Langerhans is the area in which the endocrine,( hormone-producing) cells of the pancreas are grouped. Discovered in 1869 by the famous German pathological anatomist Paul Langerhans, the islets of Langerhans constitute approximately 1 to 2% of the mass of the pancreas. There are about one million islets in a healthy adult human pancreas, which are distributed evenly throughout the organ; their combined mass is 1 to 1.5 grams. Insulin acts as a key to open the blood cells and release the glucose into the body where it is needed. This insulin must be replaced. People with Type 1 diabetes must have insulin every day to live. At this stage that means insulin injection via an insulin syringe or pen, or an insulin pump. Read more here at Diabetes Australia What age is it diagnosed? While Type 1 diabetes can and does occur at any age, it usually starts in childhood, the teen years and in young adults, with the peak age being 11 years old. It is most common under 40 years of age. People diagnosed as adults can find it tough going as it can be assumed they have type 2 diabetes due to their age. There is an adult onset autoimmune diabetes (LADA) which is basically type 1 diabetes in adults – it has a slow onset, not quick like the usual type 1 diabetes and is also ofte Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes Is 'essentially My Day Job'

Managing Type 1 Diabetes Is 'essentially My Day Job'

Amber McGrath is 18 and for most of her life she's lived with type 1 diabetes. She's one of about 35,000 under-19s in the UK with the condition, according to the charity Diabetes UK. Type 1 diabetes, which is different to type 2 diabetes, is an autoimmune condition which means a person's pancreas has stopped working. There is no cure and Amber will spend the rest of her life monitoring her blood glucose level constantly as well as giving herself insulin injections. BBC Advice has more help and information about diabetes. "Essentially my day job is being an organ in my body, which is the pancreas I'm missing," Amber, who is from Portsmouth, tells Newsbeat. "People don't realise how much hard work goes into it." "On average, a blood glucose test, which I should be performing at least four times a day probably takes about two minutes," says Amber. "An [insulin] injection probably takes about five minutes. "It doesn't sound like a lot but there are all of the mental calculations you have to do when it comes to eating food, drinking alcohol, exercising especially, which I don't think I could put a time on." You can read more about Lydia Parkhurst, who has type 1 diabetes and explains why it's not down to her diet or weight. Amber's goal is to keep her blood sugar reading between four and seven. You can see from her diary that Amber woke up at 10.20pm, not long after going to bed and just before 5am, with readings lower than four. This means she was hypoglycemic and the amount of glucose in her blood was too low. "I will physically shake, I will feel very tired. I usually get emotional," she explains. "Your body and your brain are shutting down due to lack of glucose. "I have to wake up, treat that. I usually have a bottle of Lucozade, wait 20 minutes, recheck my blood sugar Continue reading >>

$50 Million In Donations To City Of Hope Aim For Diabetes Cure In 6 Years

$50 Million In Donations To City Of Hope Aim For Diabetes Cure In 6 Years

DUARTE — More than $50 million in private funding has the City of Hope research and treatment center setting the lofty goal today of curing Type 1 diabetes in six years. The funding was donated to the hospital’s Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute in part by the Wanek family, which controls Ashley Furniture, and some anonymous private benefactors. “City of Hope scientists’ research has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of diabetes,” said Todd Wanek, CEO of Ashley Furniture. “It continues today as physicians and scientists gain systemic understanding of diabetes as a complex, multifaceted disease. Our family is extremely confident that City of Hope is the institution that will find a cure for the more than 1 million Americans who battle type 1 diabetes disease every day.” City of Hope officials said The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes will create several programs that will seek a cure through immunotherapy approaches and research into beta cell transplantation. In 1978, one of City of Hope’s researchers, Arthur D. Riggs, developed a synthetic human insulin used today by an estimated 1.5 million Americans with Type 1 diabetes and 27 million with Type 2 diabetes. “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” said Robert W. Stone, president and CEO of City of Hope. “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes.” He added, “City of Hope is extremely grateful for the Wanek family’s significant gift that will enable the institution to forward Fype 1 diabetes research, the results of which will have worldwide impact. We invite others to join the Wanek family and City of Hope as we continue to move even closer to a cure for Type 1 diabetes.” Continue reading >>

Dogs Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes

Dogs Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes

Beagles no longer showed diabetes symptoms following a single course of gene therapy. Gene therapy has successfully banished type 1 diabetes in dogs, the first time this treatment has worked to treat the disease in a large animal, according to a study published online in the journal Diabetes earlier this month (February 1). For the study, Spanish researchers induced diabetes in beagles between 6 months and 1 year old. They then injected the dogs’ skeletal muscles with viruses carrying genes for insulin and glucokinase, an enzyme involved in processing glucose. Following the treatment, the researcher confirmed that the genes had been incorporated into the DNA of the dogs, which were able to regulate their own blood sugar levels without medical help. And when they exercised, they no longer had episodes of hypoglycemia. Dogs that were injected with viruses carrying only the gene for insulin or only the gene for glucokinase continued to have symptoms of diabetes, indicating that the genes acted in concert. Following more tests in dogs, the researchers hope to try out the treatment in humans. But sources warned New Scientist that the treatment might not work the same way in humans that it did in canines, as the dogs’ diabetes was induced by chemically destroying pancreas cells that produce insulin. In naturally occurring type 1 diabetes, on the other hand, the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells. Still, “this work is an interesting new avenue which may give us a completely new type of treatment,” Matthew Hobbs, head of research at Diabetes UK, told New Scientist. Continue reading >>

Dr. Accili Answers Questions About Diabetes Research On Reddit

Dr. Accili Answers Questions About Diabetes Research On Reddit

Earlier this month, Columbia University Medical Center’s Domenico Accili, MD, published exciting diabetes research results in the journal Nature Communications. By switching off a single gene, Dr. Accili’s team successfully converted human gastrointestinal cells into insulin-producing cells, demonstrating, in principle, that a drug could retrain cells inside a person’s GI tract to produce insulin. The finding raises hopes of a treatment for type 1 diabetes patients, who have lost insulin-producing cells. Read the news release. Dr. Accili recently participated in an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session on the website Reddit. The science AMA series is intended to help to bridge the gap between practicing scientists and the general public. Below are excerpted questions and answers from Dr. Accili’s session. Reddit question (R): Whenever we hear about amazing new discoveries in medicine, it feels like they rarely turn into a product/treatment used by the general public. Could you please give us an idea of the process of going from a finding like yours to actually being a viable and regularly used treatment option? Dr. Domenico Accili (DA): The process of turning an exciting basic science discovery into a treatment is a long one, even under the best of circumstances. And we have to remember that insulin treatment, while not a cure, is safe and effective. So, the bar to replace it with something else is extraordinarily high, as it should be. Having said that, my main reason for doing this AMA today is to have the sort of dialogue between clinician/scientists, patients, and their families that I think we need, in order to correct misperceptions arising from overpromising and inflated expectations. I think that we shouldn’t guesstimate when a cure will be available. And I th Continue reading >>

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