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Red Yeast Rice And Diabetes

Diabetes Update: Red Yeast Rice: Another Dangerous Supplement

Diabetes Update: Red Yeast Rice: Another Dangerous Supplement

Red Yeast Rice: Another Dangerous Supplement The public continues to buy the argument that "natural" products are safer and healthier than pharmaceuticals, despite ample proof that this is not true. The main reason why is this: in the 1990s wealthy large companies paid for expensive PR campaigns that appealed to the public's paranoia, convincing many that the government was trying to take away their wonderful supplements. At the same time, the industry paid large amounts into the campaign coffers of "anti-regulation" senators and in return they got the law they wanted that prohibits the government from regulating supplements. (Details about how the industry destroyed the FDA's ability to regulate supplements can be found in this Harvard Law School publication HERE .) As things stand now, manufacturers can sell pretty much anything they want to as long as they don't make health claims on the label and as long as their supplements don't cause enough death or disability to trigger an investigation. What this means for you the consumer is this: supplement manufacturers can promote their wares as medicines as heavily as they want to, as long as they do not put the claim on the actual bottle they sell. They can put it on a web site. They can pay a PR person to plant articles in health magazines, and they can send brochures to self-appointed alternative medicine "practitioners." And, believe me, they do. Supplement manufacturers often sell their extremely expensive products with the argument that the natural supplement is a better choice than a pharmaceutical drug. For example, they may tell you that soy isoflavones are better than pharmaceutical estrogen at menopause. Or that you can control your blood pressure by taking magnesium rather than blood pressure medication. As lo Continue reading >>

Red Yeast Rice

Red Yeast Rice

Member T2, 2005, finally decided to do something about it Hello, all. I have a question but have to give you a little background information. In the past my Cholesterol has been bad. I have not tested in awhile. I was on lipitor for awhile but due to my other diease CMT1A which has muscle wasting like D I pulled myself off this medication. It was causing me to much pain and muscle wasting. The forum I am apart of for CMT, geeezzz I do a lot of this, there was a guy that recommended Red yeast rice, but of course now I am worried about the carbs. Nothing like trying to find a happy medium between 2 diseases Just came back to see if any replies. I look up at the google ad bar, and there is red Yeast Rice Pills. Who knew! Never heard of that. But did you inform your doctor you are having those problems? Something you should let them know. There are other meds that they can use. [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][COLOR=Magenta]Kris[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Lucida Sans Unicode] Member T2, 2005, finally decided to do something about it Never heard of that. But did you inform your doctor you are having those problems? Something you should let them know. There are other meds that they can use. Yes, thanks. She is fully aware. She sent me to a specialist and he was pushing diet and excerise so I have been trying that. They are still a bit high, so I was hoping I could try some natural method and see if that helps. So far I have to stay away from all the statins. They all have the same effect. Do you know what the other meds are called? I dont know what all the names are just know that some things exists. I am on lovastatin and my endo said if i get pains and stuff there is other drugs out there that we can use. but so far no issues Member T2, 2005, finally decided to do something a Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet And Red Yeast Rice Supplementation For The Management Of Hyperlipidemia In Statin-intolerant Patients With Or Without Type 2 Diabetes

Mediterranean Diet And Red Yeast Rice Supplementation For The Management Of Hyperlipidemia In Statin-intolerant Patients With Or Without Type 2 Diabetes

Mediterranean Diet and Red Yeast Rice Supplementation for the Management of Hyperlipidemia in Statin-Intolerant Patients with or without Type 2 Diabetes 1Department of Medicine-DIMED, University of Padua, Via Giustiniani, 2, 35100 Padova, Italy 2Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padua, Via Giustianiani, 2, 35100 Padova, Italy Received 2013 Aug 29; Accepted 2013 Dec 5. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Lipid profile could be modified by Mediterranean diet (MD) and by red yeast rice (RYR). We assessed the lipid-lowering effects of MD alone or in combination with RYR on dyslipidemic statin-intolerant subjects, with or without type 2 diabetes, for 24 weeks. We evaluated the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level, total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, liver enzyme, and creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels. We studied 171 patients: 46 type 2 diabetic patients treated with MD alone (Group 1), 44 type 2 diabetic patients treated with MD associated with RYR (Group 2), 38 dyslipidemic patients treated with MD alone (Group 3), and 43 dyslipidemic patients treated with MD plus RYR (Group 4). The mean percentage changes in LDL cholesterol from the baseline were 7.34 3.14% (P < 0.05) for Group 1; 21.02 1.63% (P < 0.001) for Group 2; 12.47 1.75% (P < 0.001) for Group 3; and 22 2.19% (P < 0.001) for Group 4 with significant intergroup difference (Group 1 versus Group 2, P < 0.001; Group 3 versus Group 4, P > 0.05). No significant increase in AST, ALT, and CPK lev Continue reading >>

Red Yeast Rice To Lower Cholesterol

Red Yeast Rice To Lower Cholesterol

Red yeast rice has been used as a food additive and medicine in parts of Asia for centuries. It's a substance extracted from rice that has been fermented with special yeast. Several studies have shown good evidence that red yeast rice can significantly lower total and LDL -- "bad" -- cholesterol . One component of red yeast rice, monacolin K, is similar to the active ingredient of some of the cholesterol lowering drugs called statins . Red yeast rice does not seem to be as effective as most conventional statin drugs, however. But these supplements may be a good choice for people who could benefit from only a slight lowering of cholesterol . There are other traditional medicinal uses of red yeast rice: to reduce swelling and digestion problems, and to treat cuts and wounds, cancer , and other conditions. These uses of red yeast rice, however, have not been tested scientifically. Doctors haven't established a set dosage for red yeast rice. Quality and active ingredients in supplements may vary widely from maker to maker. This makes it very hard to establish a standard dose. If you are interested in adding red yeast rice to your diet, talk to your health care provider first. No. Red yeast rice does not occur naturally in other foods. What Are the Risks of Taking Red Yeast Rice? Side effects. Red yeast rice side effects are usually mild. It might cause headaches and upset stomach . Not much is known about the long-term safety of red yeast rice. Since red yeast rice contains naturally occurring components which are very similar to statin medications , the same side effects may occur, including but not limited to muscle pain and liver injury. Interactions. Do not take red yeast rice if you are using statins , drugs that suppress the immune system, antifungal drugs, certain a Continue reading >>

Red Yeast Rice | Metabolism Miracle/diabetes Miracle Blog

Red Yeast Rice | Metabolism Miracle/diabetes Miracle Blog

his ancient Chinese staple could have knocked costly statins out of the ballpark We own it said the pharmaceutical industry in the US with the help of the FDA And now, Red Yeast Rice on the shelves in the US is stripped of its beneficial ingredient For centuries red yeast rice (RYR) has been used as a staple in China and Japan. It has been consumed as a preservative, food colorant, spice, and as an ingredient in rice wine Red yeast rice is a product of the fermentation of red yeast (Monascuspurpureus) on rice. Since 800 A.D. the Chinese have used red yeast rice medicinally to improve circulation, alleviate indigestion, as an anti-diarrheal, and since the 1970sboth Japanese, Chinese, and US scientists have recognized its ability to lower plaque causing blood lipids LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. In 1977, Professor Endo in Japan discovered a natural cholesterol-lowering substance that is produced by a strain of Monascusyeast. This substance inhibits an enzyme that is important for the production of cholesterol in the body. Professor Endo named this substance moncacolinK. Since then, scientists have discovered a total of eight monacolin-like substances that have cholesterol-lowering properties. They are all derived from red yeast rice. The active ingredients in RYRwere developed into a supplement that was available over the counter in health food stores under the trade names Cholestinand Hypocol; Both products were produced through the fermentation of selected strains of Monascuspurpureus, using a proprietary process that produces a certain concentration of monacolinK. It is interesting to note that lovastatin(the cholesterol lowering drug known as Mevacor) is currently made of monacolin K. Studies have shown that red yeast rice can significantly lower levels of total Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

What is the relationship between cholesterol and diabetes? How does cholesterol affect my diabetes, and how do I manage it? Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil When Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she had questions about her cholesterol. Though her overall number was at 180 mg/dl, and in a normal range, her LDL-C was higher than normal, although mildly elevated, and her HDL-C was low. Her doctor had explained very little about this to Judy, and she was confused. How can her overall cholesterol number be acceptable, but her other cholesterol numbers were out of range. What did this mean for Judy’s health? Was she more prone to heart disease and stroke due to these cholesterol numbers? Her triglycerides were a little elevated, too. We decided to give Judy a guide that would help her to fully understand her cholesterol numbers, and how they affect her cardiovascular health. We also wanted to make sure that Judy and others like her understand how their cholesterol numbers relate to their diabetes. So let’s get started… What is cholesterol Cholesterol is mainly comprised of fat and lipoproteins. A lipoprotein is comprised of cholesterol, protein, and fat (triglycerides). Cholesterol comes from two sources. Our body manufactures some cholesterol on its own. In addition, cholesterol comes from animal products, such as milk, eggs, cheese, and meats. Cholesterol has the consistency similar to gum or wax. Small amounts of cholesterol are important for a healthy cell membrane (good cholesterol), and some cholesterol has been deemed, “the bad cholesterol,” due to these cholesterol particles tends to cause atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Some cholesterol is “good,” cholesterol, that tends to carry the bad cholesterol away and out the body. That is why y Continue reading >>

Red Yeast Rice | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Red Yeast Rice | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I ordered some red yeast rice after reading Viv's account of taking it instead of statins. I was prescribed Simvastatin at diagnosis, then after a while asked to be taken of it. It wasn't causing me any side effects, but I had read up on statins and don't want to be part of that. My GP does however believe in statins and agreed to take me off SImvastatin and put me on a very low dose of Atorvastatin. Within days my hair started coming out in clumps, so I stopped the statin. I think it's about six weeks ago I stopped taking them, and my hair is still coming out, so I am not a happy bunny. My cholesterol was 3.1 so I don't feel I need to be on statins, so when I noticed Viv mention Red yeast rice, I thought I would give it a go. First dose today. Does anyone else take RYR and if so, has it worked for you? I will try anything once, but am keen to hear other stories as well, good and bad. I will update you all on how I get on. They have to be better than the dreaded statin! Continue reading >>

Red Yeast Rice - Mayo Clinic

Red Yeast Rice - Mayo Clinic

Red yeast rice is the product of yeast (Monascus purpureus) grown on white rice. The powdered yeast-rice mixture is a dietary staple in Asia and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine. Red yeast rice is also available as an oral supplement. Red yeast rice might contain compounds that appear to lower cholesterol levels. One of the compounds is monacolin K, the same ingredient that is in the prescription cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin (Altoprev). As an oral supplement, people take red yeast rice for high cholesterol and heart disease. Research on red yeast rice use for specific conditions shows: High cholesterol (hyperlipidemia). Research shows that red yeast rice containing considerable amounts of monacolin K can lower your total blood cholesterol level, your low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol level and your triglyceride level. Red yeast rice is capable of lowering blood cholesterol levels and total blood cholesterol levels. While the supplement is generally considered safe, it might carry the same potential side effects as statin cholesterol drugs. Red yeast rice might cost less than a statin. However, with a supplement, there's less assurance regarding quality and how much active ingredient is actually in the product. Some red yeast products might contain only small amounts of monacolin K and potentially have little effect on cholesterol levels. Red yeast rice can cause mild side effects, including: Red yeast rice might contain monacolin K, the same ingredient that is in the prescription cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin. Lovastatin side effects include liver damage and muscle disorders (myopathy). Don't take red yeast rice if you're pregnant, trying to become pregnant or breast-feeding. An older study raised the concern that some red Continue reading >>

Red Yeast Rice: Statin Drug Or Cholesterol-lowering Supplement - Dr. Axe

Red Yeast Rice: Statin Drug Or Cholesterol-lowering Supplement - Dr. Axe

Dr. Axe on Facebook506 Dr. Axe on Twitter6 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest102 Share on Email Print Article Annie PriceAugust 22, 2017September 5, 2017 The most well-known of red yeast rice benefits is by far its potential to lower cholesterol . Many people with high cholesterol turn to red yeast rice supplements to avoid the dangers of statins. These cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins have been linked with some really concerning side effects, including memory loss, liver damage, muscle pain, high blood sugar,and even development oftype 2 diabetes. ( 1 ) Scientific studies have demonstrated that supplementing with red yeast rice can lower overall as well as LDL cholesterol, aka bad cholesterol. ( 2 ) According toTraditionalChinese Medicine, benefits of red yeast rice also include improvements in circulation and digestion.Red yeast rice supplements are extremely popular so lets take a look at the possible benefits as well as the controversy surrounding thisnatural over-the-counter remedy. So what is red yeast rice? Sometimes called RYR for short, red yeast rice is createdby fermenting a type of yeast called Monascus purpureuswith rice.Once the rice is combined with the fermenting yeast, the resulting red yeast rice is bright reddish purple in color. Red yeast rice extract (RYRE) is used to make a red yeast rice supplement. Sowhat makes RYR possibly beneficial to health concerns like high cholesterol? The interesting thing is that it has naturally occurring chemical called monacolins, which block the production of cholesterol. One of these monacolins sometimes found in RYR supplements, called monacolin K, has beencontroversial because this chemical is said to be an activestatin-like compound with the same chemica Continue reading >>

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

High cholesterol has long been known to raise the risk of heart and blood vessel disease in people with diabetes and without. Unfortunately, it’s very common among Americans generally, including those with diabetes. The good news is that there’s a lot you can do to lower your cholesterol and, consequently, lower your risk of heart disease. Making the effort to lower blood cholesterol is especially important for people with diabetes — Type 1 or Type 2 — who have a higher risk of heart disease than the general public. The bad guy: LDL Your LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol is the culprit when it comes to raising the risk of heart disease. LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein, and if you have too much of it in your blood, it can build up along the insides of your artery walls, leading to the formation of fatty deposits called plaque. Plaque makes it harder for blood to flow through your arteries, which means that less blood can get to vital organs, such as your heart and brain. Sometimes this can lead to a heart attack or a stroke. Plaque can also rupture, triggering the formation of blood clots, which can also block the arteries, leading to a heart attack or stroke. So it makes sense to keep your LDL level low. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most adults with diabetes who are not taking cholesterol-lowering statins have a fasting lipid profile done at diagnosis, first medical evaluation, and thenevery five years after, while those taking statins should have the test done when they start the medication and periodically thereafter. This test measures HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, as well as the level of triglycerides (a type of blood fat) in the blood. HDL cholesterol above 50 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, and triglycerides below 150 mg Continue reading >>

Red Yeast Rice: Get Facts On Benefits, Side Effects & Risks

Red Yeast Rice: Get Facts On Benefits, Side Effects & Risks

Red yeast rice is rice that has been fermented by the red yeast, Monascus purpureus. It has been used by the Chinese for many centuries as a food preservative, food colorant (it is responsible for the red color of Peking duck), spice, and an ingredient in rice wine. Red yeast rice continues to be a dietary staple in China, Japan, and Asian communities in the United States, with an estimated average consumption of 14 to 55 grams of red yeast rice per day per person. Red yeast rice also has been used in China for over 1,000 years for medicinal purposes. Red yeast rice was described in an ancient Chinese list of drugs as useful for improving blood circulation and for alleviating indigestion and diarrhea . Recently, red yeast rice has been developed by Chinese and American scientists as a product to lower blood lipids , including cholesterol and triglycerides . What is the present status of red yeast rice? Small scale studies using pharmaceutical-grade red rice yeast have continued to demonstrate efficacy and safety. However, in the United States it is no longer legal to sell supplements of red yeast rice that contain more than trace amounts of cholesterol lowering substances. For example, the active ingredients of red rice yeast have been removed from Cholestin marketed in the United States. (Hypocol, another product containing red yeast rice is no longer being sold in the United States.) The reasons the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has ruled that it is illegal to sell red yeast rice that contains more than trace amounts of the cholesterol-lowering substances and to promote red yeast rice for lowering cholesterol levels. First, statin drugs are associated with muscle and kidney injury when used alone or combined with other medications. There is concern that patients Continue reading >>

Statins Make Diabetes More Likely

Statins Make Diabetes More Likely

The evidence continues to mount that statin-type cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart disease may spur the onset of type 2 diabetes. The latest research comes from the Womens Health Initiative, an enormous study of more than 150,000 postmenopausal women that began in the mid 1990s. In the decade between the start of the study and 2005, more than 10,000 of these women developed diabetes. The researchers calculate that women taking statin drugs such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor) were 48 percent more likely to be diagnosed with this metabolic condition. The study was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine . This is not the first time statin drugs have been linked to a higher risk of diabetes. The first clear scientific indication of a connection came in 2008 from the JUPITER trial of 17,000 healthy people who took either Crestor or placebo for two years. While the volunteers taking Crestor had fewer heart attacks and other cardiovascular events, they were also more likely to be diagnosed by their doctors with diabetes. Doctors were somewhat reluctant to believe that the risk was real, but in April, 2011, researchers reviewed data from three different statin studies and published the findings in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology . Subjects taking atorvastatin (Lipitor) were more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, especially if they already had risk factors for the disease such as excess weight, high triglycerides and high blood sugar. Then in June, 2011, a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that people on high-dose statin therapy had a greater risk of developing new-onset diabetes compared with those on more moderate doses. Long before any of these Continue reading >>

An Old Asian Standby, Red Yeast Rice, May Lower Cholesterol In People Who Are Statin-intolerant

An Old Asian Standby, Red Yeast Rice, May Lower Cholesterol In People Who Are Statin-intolerant

An Old Asian Standby, Red Yeast Rice, May Lower Cholesterol in People Who Are Statin-Intolerant A 24-week study of the effects of red yeast rice on the cholesterol levels of people who cannot take statins shows that the ancient Asian food could be a viable statin alternative. Patients who took 1,800 mg of a commercially available red yeast product twice daily enjoyed a long-term drop of 35 points in their cholesterol levels, versus 15 points for patients taking a placebo. Red yeast rice is rice that has been grown with a yeast, Monascus purpureus, on it. Asians have used it for centuries as both a food and a medicine. European and American scientists have long believed that it has significant cholesterol-lowering abilities. The studys designers, a group of Pennsylvania physicians, looked at 62 patients who had been forced to stop taking statins because of such side effects as weakness and muscle wasting. Statins, which are typically prescribed for people who run a high risk of cardiovascular disease, are a class of drugs that lower cholesterol in the blood by inhibiting an enzyme involved in its production. A significant drawback to statins is their potential to cause liver damage in some patients. Although the study results were encouraging, several issues have to be addressed before red yeast rice joins the pharmacopeia as a prescription for lowering cholesterol: The study group was too small to provide more than a confirmation that a bigger group of patients will have to be studied. Supplies of red yeast rice in the United States are not reliable or consistent. The FDA has concerns that one of the natural statins contained in red rice yeast, lovastatin, is the basis of an already existing prescription drug called Mevacor. Therefore, many red yeast rice products are Continue reading >>

How Safe Is Red Yeast Rice? 6 Facts You Need To Know!

How Safe Is Red Yeast Rice? 6 Facts You Need To Know!

Red yeast rice has been touted as a natural and safe alternative to statins for folks with elevated levels of cholesterol. It’s a reddish purple fermented rice and has been used in Chinese cuisine and Traditional Chinese Medicine for centuries. Its use in Traditional Chinese Medicine has been traced back to approximately 800 AD during the Tang Dynasty where it’s mainly used to invigorate the body, revitalize the blood and aid in digestion. How did red yeast rice acquire its reputation as a supposedly safer alternative to statins? According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, red yeast rice contains chemicals that are similar to prescription statin medications. One of these, called monacolin K, has the same makeup as the drug lovastatin (Mevacor) which is a prescription drug for folks with high cholesterol. Basically if it contains the same chemicals as statins, then by definition, red yeast rice also a statin but sold as a supplement instead. And just like statins, there are adverse effects that need to be considered. So if it has the same chemical ingredients i.e. monacolins as statins then how safe is it? Red Yeast Rice is Not Regulated like Statins Unlike statins that can only be prescribed by doctors, red yeast rice can be bought off the shelf and online from health food stores so anyone can buy the supplement. Statins like Lipitor and Crestor are regulated by health authorities and when your doctor prescribes them to you, he or she knows the precise dosage of the drug(s) that you should be taking. And he or she can lower the dosage if you experience any adverse effects. Also the dosage(s) can be adjusted based to your regular blood tests which include looking for high liver enzyme readings. But that’s not the case for red yeast rice because you won Continue reading >>

Why Consumer Reports Is Wrong About Red Yeast Rice

Why Consumer Reports Is Wrong About Red Yeast Rice

Why Consumer Reports Is WRONG About Red Yeast Rice Why Consumer Reports Is WRONG About Red Yeast Rice Recently Ive been getting a lot of emails about the safety of using Red Yeast Rice, which is one of the ingredients in our best selling, cholesterol lowering supplement CholesLo. This is because Consumer Reports came out with the 15 Supplement.. Recently Ive been getting a lot of emails about the safety of using Red Yeast Rice, which is one of the ingredients in our best selling, cholesterol lowering supplement CholesLo This is because Consumer Reports came out with the 15 Supplement Ingredients to Always Avoid list and Red Yeast Rice was one of the 15 ingredients on the list. Unfortunately, the information is vague, wrong and inaccurate. They stated risks as: Kidney and muscle problems, liver problems, hair loss; can magnify effect of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, increasing the risk of side effects Of course, they never state HOW or WHY Red Yeast Rice could cause this. However, what they HAVE done is inaccurately listed statin drug side-effects! One of the most prescribed drugs in the world for almost 2 decades, are cholesterol lowering statin drugs. The most popular ones being Lipitor, Crestor, Zocor and similar ones. Doctors used to (and still do) say how these drugs are so amazing and healthy for you. And the minute anyone had even slightly elevated cholesterol levels, doctors were quick to prescribe these powerful (and harmful) drugs. However, in the past few years the truth has come out The fact that statin drugs are very toxic and have numerous side-effects such as memory loss, muscle pain, liver damage, diabetes, high blood pressure, impotence and more. Im VERY familiar with this topic because this is exactly what I had to deal with my own parents back in Continue reading >>

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