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Red Grapes And Diabetes

The Right Way To Eat Grapes For Each Type Of Diabetes

The Right Way To Eat Grapes For Each Type Of Diabetes

Grapes are one of the most popular fruits on the planet thanks to their varieties, flavor, texture, and portability. They provide numerous health benefits most of which are supported by scientific studies. They are related to prevention of heart disease, constipation, high blood pressure, and even cancer thanks to their rich content of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other nutrients. What’s more, they provide powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, and anti-aging properties. However, are they good for people with diabetes? What is their effect on blood sugar and how much is safe to eat for these people? Here’s everything you need to know about grapes and diabetes. Grapes and Diabetes All fruits contain fructose and glucose, but this doesn’t mean that a person with diabetes should avoid them completely. In contrary, they should consume fruits in moderate amounts as they provide numerous health benefits, but on the recommendation of a dietician or doctor. In fact, fruits are an important part of the meal plan of people with diabetes, including grapes. Besides containing naturally occurring sugars, red grapes also have a high content of fiber which slows down the absorption of nutrients in your body. This, in turn, prevent the occurrence of spikes in your blood glucose. Fibers don’t raise your blood sugar, unlike carbs and sugars. How Much to Eat Red and black grapes have highly nutritional content which is why the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends them for people with diabetes. You can have about 3 servings per day, which equals to 1 serving with each meal. There are only 52 calories and 11.69 gr of sugar in ½ a cup of red grapes. However, 5.43 gr of this amount is glucose, 0.11 gr is sucrose, and 6.14 gr are fructose. A Continue reading >>

Grapes For Diabetes

Grapes For Diabetes

Grapes are considered healthy foods for a lot of reasons. They are considered a health food because they are rich in minerals, vitamins, fiber, and other nutrients. Fruits are high in glucose and fructose, but should still be a part of the diabetic diet for the many benefits they offer to your body. Since fruits can upset the balance of glucose levels in your blood, they should be consumed in small or controlled quantities only on the recommendation of your doctor or a dietician. Fruits are an important part of the diabetic meal plan. Red grapes have naturally occurring sugars, but they also contain good amounts of fiber, which prevent your body form absorbing the nutrients form grapes too quickly. This ultimately prevents your blood glucose levels from spiking suddenly. Unlike sugars and carbohydrates, fibers do not cause an increase in the blood sugar levels. Doctors recommend grapes for diabetes. You can simply consume about three servings of grapes every day. This amounts to one serving of grapes with each meal. The American Diabetes Association recommends red and black grapes for diabetics owing to their high nutritional content. Half a cup of red grapes for diabetics contain only 52 calories. This serving of red grapes also contains about 11.69 grams of sugar. Of this, 0.11 grams is sucrose, 5.43 grams glucose, and 6.14 grams of fructose. These also contain a small amount of fiber that can help your health. Diabetics Associations also recommend consuming green grapes for diabetics. Green grapes have higher levels of fiber than red or black grapes. They are also rich in vitamin C and K, potassium, and polyphenols. They also contain antioxidants that are excellent for diabetics. There is no relationship between grapes and blood sugar. However, since they do not caus Continue reading >>

Grapes For Diabetes

Grapes For Diabetes

Grapes are an ancient fruit that have been with us since the dawn of mankind. The fruit originates from Western Asia and Central Europe. Various types of grapevines have traversed the whole world and have easily been assimilated into many civilizations’ diet due to the fruits sweet taste and incredible health benefits. Even the most practiced religion, Christianity has included the grape (wine) into their most sacred practices and has played a role in a myriad of biblical stories. The grape is currently cultivated on every continent on earth excluding Antarctica. Unfortunately only recently have scientists been researching the sweet berry for more health benefits other than the common ones that are present in most fruits. Grapes have a low glycemic index (GI), low calories (1 cup has 104), and a plethora of health benefits. While most diabetics still avoid any sugary fruits, many experts recommend you eat them regularly and in moderation. Grapes have an abundant amount of phytochemicals that contain antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. These can help reduce the risk cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cellular damage caused by free radicals. Numerous studies on the effects of grapes on diabetes have proved conclusive. The experiments have shown that the delicious fruit is exceptionally well at regulating blood sugar levels, lower triglyceride levels, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and increases insulin sensitivity. Recent research on a new phytonutrient called resveratrol which is mainly found in the skin of the grape may be linked to increased longevity. A new study has shown that in animals introduced regularly with this compound help activate proteins that promote optimal health and anti-aging properties. The resveratrol in red wine might be linked to the Continue reading >>

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Save for later Although we know fruits and vegetables are good for us people with diabetes are often told they can’t eat fruit because they are too sweet or contain sugar. All fruits contain natural sugar, but also contain a good mix of vitamins, minerals and fibre. Why are fruit and vegetables so good for us? Eating fruits and vegetables lowers the risk of developing many health conditions including high blood pressure, heart diseases, strokes, obesity and certain cancers. It’s even more important for people with diabetes to eat more fruits and vegetables as most of these conditions are more likely to affect them. Fruits and vegetables have a good mix of soluble and insoluble fibre which is good for your bowels and general health – so it makes sense to eat more of them Should people with diabetes cut back on fruit because of sugar content? Managing diabetes has to do with managing your blood glucose, blood fats, blood pressure and your weight, and fruits and vegetables can play a positive role in all these. The concern has been that because fruits contain sugar, it makes your blood glucose go up. In fact, most fruits have low to medium glycaemic index, so they do not lead to a sharp rise in your blood glucose levels compared to other carbohydrate containing foods like white or wholemeal bread. Portion size is very important when considering the biggest effects on your blood glucose levels so let’s look at this in more detail. A portion of fruit contains about 15-20g carbohydrate on average, which is similar to a slice of bread. To put things in perspective, just a can of cola contains 35g carb and a medium slice of chocolate cake contains 35g of carbs as well. So, if you are looking to reduce your carb intake, with the aim to manage blood glucose levels, the ad Continue reading >>

Can Wine Treat Diabetes?

Can Wine Treat Diabetes?

Red wine, you do more than make us feel fine: In addition to helping protect our tickers, the skin of red grapes—specifically the natural chemical compound resveratrol—may actually help diabetics regulate their blood sugar, according to new research in the journal Nutrition Research. Researchers in India recruited 62 people being treated for Type 2 diabetes, and gave half of them a 250-milligram resveratrol supplement once a day for three months. The results? Those who took the supplement had lower blood glucose levels than those who didn’t. Plus, the resveratrol-takers also had significant decreases in total cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. More from Prevention.com: 12 Ways To Never Get Diabetes Why? The reason isn’t clear, but the researchers say resveratrol may help stimulate insulin secretion or activate a protein that helps regulate glucose and insulin sensitivity. (Learn more about the wonders of red wine with It’s The Red, Not The Wine.) While the results certainly sound promising, don’t run out and buy a supplement just yet, says Rita Kalyani, MD, an endocrinologist and diabetes researcher at John Hopkins. More research needs to be done before doctors would consider recommending it, she says. And hitting up the liquor store in the hopes that red wine can control your blood sugar isn’t a good bet either: Red wine only contains up to 14 milligrams of resveratrol per liter, while study participants consumed 250 milligrams a day via a supplement. “You would need to drink a case of red wine or eat bushels of grapes, and at that point, the negative effects of consuming such large amounts of alcohol or sugar would outweigh any potential benefit,” says Ava Port, MD, an endocrinologist and diabetes researcher at the University of Maryland. Botto Continue reading >>

Are Grapes And/or Grape Juice Bad For People With Type 2 Diabetes?

Are Grapes And/or Grape Juice Bad For People With Type 2 Diabetes?

A: No, grapes and grape juice are not “bad” for people with diabetes. Grapes are actually rich in phytonutrients, nutrients that are thought to play a role in disease prevention, cognitive function and immunity. However, it’s important to keep in mind that all fruit and fruit juices contain carbohydrate. People with diabetes need to control their carbohydrate intake. A “serving” of grapes is about 17; a serving of grape juice is 1/3 of a cup. Depending on your carbohydrate goals for your meals and snacks, you should be able to fit grapes and/or grape juice into your eating plan, but you’ll need to keep an eye on your portion. Also, it’s generally recommended that one eat whole fruit instead of drinking juice. Drinking juice is less satisfying than eating fruit, and some people find that it raises blood glucose levels rather quickly. Continue reading >>

Are Red Grapes Safe For Diabetes?

Are Red Grapes Safe For Diabetes?

Before, diabetic patients are often advised to avoid any fruit that has high content of sugar. However, most modern diabetes diet will include fruits to form a healthy and well-balanced meal plan. It is important that you maintain strict control of the level of your blood sugar and avoid consuming excessive unhealthy food that can further complicate your condition. Diabetes Diet Your diabetes diet should aim towards controlling the symptoms and preventing common complications. For most patients, this mean eating high fiber diet that has less fats, especially saturated fats. These fats can contribute to arterial plaques, which is a common complication of diabetes. Diabetic patients should limit their intake of carbohydrates, especially sweet tasting food that can cause a spike in the blood sugar level. Generally, eating up to three handfuls of fruits each day should be fine for diabetic patients. Red grapes can be included in this. Eating carbohydrate enrich foods can send your blood sugar level soaring. Fortunately, protein, fiber and fat can possibly mitigate such response. A good diabetic diet would mean controlling carbohydrate intake in every meal. Glycemic Index of Red Grapes Diabetic patients should refer to the Glycemic Index (GI) of a food to determine if it is safe for them. GI indicates how high or how fast the blood sugar level will rise as a response to a certain carbohydrate enrich food. The glycemic load will also take into consideration the amount of carbohydrates in every food serving, including the GI of such food. As for the red grapes, it belongs in the middle of the GI chart and has a low GI load. The reason is because both fiber and water in a single serving of red grapes can modulate the body’s response to blood glucose. Resveratrol in Red Grapes Continue reading >>

Effects Of Red Grape Cells (rgc) Powder In Type 2 Diabetics (rgc-t2d)

Effects Of Red Grape Cells (rgc) Powder In Type 2 Diabetics (rgc-t2d)

The aim of this study is to examine whether the chronic administration during 12 weeks of polyphenols contained in Red Grape Cells (RGC) powder has an effect on mRNA expression of SIRT1 and Clock Genes, on circulating levels of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and on postprandial response of glucose, lipids, insulin, C-peptide and GLP-1 in patients with type 2 diabetes . There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that polyphenols and specially the most investigated Resveratrol contained in the Red Grape Cells (RGC) exert beneficial effects on several markers of metabolic syndrome i.e. antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, vasodilator and antihypertensive activity. Many of this beneficial metabolic effects of polyphenols, occurs via activation of sirtuin-1 or silent information regulator-1 gene (SIRT1). This gene is expressed in adipose tissue, muscle, endothelium, peripheral blood cells, etc where it plays a pivotal role in the regulation of Circadian Clock Genes (CCG) involved in glucose lipid metabolism, endothelial function, etc . By activation of SIRT1 and CCG the polyphenols, may influence the circadian secretion of adiponectin, insulin, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and other hormones that influence insulin sensitivity, muscular glucose uptake, NO synthesis, nocturnal hepatic glucose production, lipolisis and endothelial function It was shown in several studies in animals and in clinical studies in subjects with metabolic syndrome that SIRT1 expression and its regulation of the CCG, improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle, preventing weight gain; improves pancreatic beta-cell function enhancing insulin secretion and glucose tolerance. It was associated with increased lipolisis in white adipose tissue, decreased glycolysis, increase Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Orange-grape Pills May Lower Blood Sugar

Orange-grape Pills May Lower Blood Sugar

Overweight people who took a capsule for eight weeks that contained two compounds found in red grapes and oranges saw improvements in blood sugar levels and artery function, researchers report. “This is an incredibly exciting development and could have a massive impact on our ability to treat these diseases,” says Paul Thornalley, a professor in systems biology at the University of Warwick Medical School. “As well as helping to treat diabetes and heart disease, it could defuse the obesity time bomb.” When participants received both compounds—trans-resveratrol (tRES) in red grapes and hesperetin (HESP) in oranges—at pharmaceutical doses, the compounds acted in tandem to decrease blood glucose, improve the action of insulin, and boost the health of arteries. “As well as helping to treat diabetes and heart disease, it could defuse the obesity time bomb.” After eight weeks on the treatment, researchers noted an improvement in insulin resistance in trial participants that was similar to improvements seen six months after bariatric surgery. The compounds work by increasing a protein called glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) in the body that neutralizes a damaging sugar-derived compound called methylglyoxal (MG). For the study, researchers increased Glo1 expression in cell culture and then tested the formulation in a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial. Thirty-two overweight and obese people between the ages of 18 and 80 age who had a BMI between 25 to 40 took part in the trial. They were given the supplement in capsule form once a day for eight weeks. They were asked to maintain their usual diet and their food intake was monitored via a dietary questionnaire. They were also asked not to alter their daily physical activity. Changes to their sugar levels we Continue reading >>

10 Low-glycemic Fruits For Diabetes

10 Low-glycemic Fruits For Diabetes

We humans come by our sweet tooth naturally — Our bodies need carbohydrates because they provide energy to cells. But for the body to be able to use it for energy, we need insulin. When our bodies don’t produce any insulin or are unable to use it (type 1 diabetes) or make enough of it properly (type 2 diabetes), we’re at risk for high blood sugar levels. High levels can lead to chronic complications such as nerve, eye, or kidney damage. The glycemic index (GI) tells you how quickly foods containing carbohydrates affect your blood sugar level when eaten by themselves. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), GI scores are rated as: Low: 55 or below Moderate: 56 to 69 High: 70 and above The lower the GI score, the more slowly the rise in blood sugar, which can help the body better manage post-meal changes. Most whole fruits have a low to moderate GI. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. A more useful estimation of the food-blood sugar effect is the glycemic load (GL), which has more narrow categories of low, medium and high foods. This calculation takes into account the GI, plus the grams of carbohydrates per serving of the food. Though each person living with diabetes responds to or tolerates carbohydrate choices and amounts differently, GL better estimates the possible real-life impact when someone eats a particular food. To calculate the GL yourself, use this equation: GL equals the GI, multiplied by the grams of carbohydrates, divided by 100. Low: 0 to 10 Moderate: 11 to 19 High: 20 and above GI score: 20 GL score: 6 Cherries are high in potassium and packed with antioxidants, which will give your immune system a boost. Because cherries have a short growing season, it can be tough to get them fresh. However, canned ta Continue reading >>

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

People with type 2 diabetes know that they need to pay attention to their carbohydrate intake. Of the three main macronutrients in food — protein, fat, and carbohydrates — it's the carbohydrates that directly affect blood sugar levels, and this includes the carbohydrates in fruit. But a study published in August 2013 in the British Medical Journal looked at the association between fruit and type 2 diabetes and found that fruit can still be a crucial part of a good diabetes diet. The study, which followed nearly 190,000 people over a number of years, found that eating whole fruits — especially blueberries, grapes, and apples — significantly reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes. On the flip side, drinking more fruit juices actually increases the risk for diabetes. “If you have type 2 diabetes, you do need to watch your sugar," says Katie Barbera, RD, CDE, of Northwell Health Systems in New Hyde Park, New York. She explains that while both whole fruit and fruit juice have carbohydrates, a small piece of whole fruit is equal to about 4 ounces (oz) of fruit juice. So if you drink 12 oz of fruit juice, you could be getting more than you need. “And whole fruits have a lot of other advantages for a diabetes diet," Barbera adds. Understanding the Carbohydrates in Fruit Like vegetables and grains, fruits contain carbs. You need the fruits for a healthy diet, but with type 2 diabetes you also need to keep track of the carbs. Still, figuring out which fruits are best for diabetes is about more than counting carbs — it's also important to take into account the beneficial nutrients certain fruits provide. “Whole fruits are an excellent source of antioxidants," Barbera says. "They have a lot of fiber, so they make you feel fuller and satisfy your hunger. They also add Continue reading >>

Red-grapes-in-paper-bag

Red-grapes-in-paper-bag

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Yes, add me to your mailing list. Avocado Basil Basil and Diabetes Bicycle Bitter Melon Black Friday Breads Breakfast Cancer Cannellini Beans Christmas recipes Cinnamon Cycling Diabetes Control Diet Soda Exercise Fats Fitness Jackfruit Kiwi Lemons and Limes Leslie Sansone Low Carbohydrate Diet Metformin Myths Oats Passion Fruit Peanut Butter Peanuts Physical Activities Plant-Based Foods Plant-Based Proteins Preparing meals at home Probiotics ProForm 505 CST Treadmill Review Pumpkin Salmon Sauerkraut Soda Sweet Potatoes Tasmania and Blood Glucose Treadmills Turmeric Vinegar Water Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

Diabetes mellitus (DM) commonly referred to as Diabetes, is a chronic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or when the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. In either case, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells for storage, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India Is home to 62 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030. Obesity is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the development of insulin resistance in approximately 90% of the individuals with type-2 diabetes. In most cases, achieving ideal body weight is associated with the restoration of normal blood sugar levels. Hence dietary modifications and treatment are fundamental to the successful treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are some specific foods that have been shown to produce positive effects on blood sugar control. These foods have a low glycemic index and glycemic load and are high in fiber. When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. TIPS TO ENJOY FRUITS IF YOU ARE DIABETIC: - Always eat fruits that are fresh, local and in season. - Eat fruits that have a low glycemic index. - Fruits should not be eaten with your main meals, its best to have fruits in between meals and as a snack. - Fruits with high glycemic index should be Continue reading >>

Red Wine And Diabetes Health: Getting Skin In The Game

Red Wine And Diabetes Health: Getting Skin In The Game

It was an unexpected pleasure to be invited to write a Perspectives in Diabetes article considering the proposition that moderate consumption of red wine provides health benefits for people with diabetes. At the outset, I want to make clear that since Perspectives in Diabetes are not review articles in the conventional sense, this one does not exhaustively analyze the effects of beer, hard liquor, or alcohol per se on health. This one is all about wine, especially red wine. This is an important point because of the intrinsic psychic influences of wine. Beer is associated with boisterous behavior at sporting events. Hard liquor is associated with serious drinking and dark moods. Wine, on the other hand, is associated with relaxation, reflection, celebration, conviviality, toasting, and a certain amount of dry humor. So, in this spirit, I will lace this article with a modicum of these wine-related characteristics. Archeologists tell us that humans made and drank wine in the Middle East (Fig. 1) beginning in ~7000 BCE—well before recorded time. During its 9,000-year history, wine has been used for many purposes, including religious (Fig. 2) and medical ones. The scientific literature over the past half century does not explicitly warn against drinking wine in moderate amounts, except during pregnancy. Yet, in the U.S. there continues to be a lurking hesitancy in some social circles about its use for relaxation or recreational purposes. Some religious faiths specifically proscribe wine, which also makes it interesting that some other religious faiths include wine in their services. Beyond use of moderate amounts, it is clear that drinking wine excessively leads to inebriation and likely endangerment of self and others, just as with any alcohol-containing beverage. In view Continue reading >>

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