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Red Grapes And Diabetes

Could Red Grapes And Oranges Treat Heart Disease, Diabetes And Obesity?

Could Red Grapes And Oranges Treat Heart Disease, Diabetes And Obesity?

A study has tested the benefits of substances found in oranges, which contain Hesperetin (HESP) and red grapes, which contain trans-resveratrol (tRES). The two substances are not usually found together but researchers have found they acted in tandem to decrease blood sugar levels, improve the action of insulin and improve the health of arteries. Now researchers at the University of Warwick believe a pill could be developed to improve the health of people living with heart disease and diabetes. Professor Paul Thornalley, who led research, said: "This is an incredibly exciting development and could have a massive impact on our ability to treat these diseases. "As well as helping to treat diabetes and heart disease it could defuse the obesity time bomb." The compounds act by increasing a protein called glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) which neutralises a damaging sugar-derived compound called methylglyoxal (MG). Increased amounts of MG in the body together with a high energy diet causes insulin resistance leading to type 2 diabetes, damages blood vessels and impairs handling of cholesterol causing an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Blocking MG improved health in overweight and obese people and will likely help patients with diabetes and high risk of cardiovascular disease too. Although the same compounds are found naturally in some fruits, experts say the amounts and type required for health improvement cannot be obtained from increased fruit consumption. But the study found pharmaceutical doses for patients with obesity, diabetes and high risk of heart disease could be given to patients in capsule form. Thirty-two overweight and obese people aged between 18-80, with a BMI between 25-40 were given the supplement in capsule form once a day for eight weeks. They maintained the Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Grapes?

Can Diabetics Eat Grapes?

Fruits have an important place in a diabetes diet. Amongst many fruits, grapes are considered as sound nourishments for a lot of reasons. Grapes contain 70-80 % water, sugar, organic acids, minerals, phenols, pectins, nitrogenous and aromatic components. They are viewed as well-being nourishment, since they are rich in minerals, vitamins, fiber, and different supplements. Organic fruits are high in glucose and fructose. However, they must be present in the diet, even if it is in a small portion. This is because of the many advantages that these fruits offer to the body. Since organic fruits can adjust the glucose levels in your blood, they ought to be devoured in little or controlled amounts just on the proposal of your specialist or a dietician. Can Diabetics Eat Grapes? Fruits are a critical piece for diabetic patients. Though red grapes contain a high amount of sugar, yet they additionally contain great measures of fiber, which keep your body from engrossing the sugar from grapes too rapidly. This, at last, keeps your blood glucose levels from increasing all of a sudden. Starches and carbohydrates, unlike sugars, don't cause an increase in the glucose levels. Specialists suggest grapes for diabetic patients. You can essentially devour around three servings of grapes consistently. This adds up to one serving of grapes with every meal. Red and dark grapes are prescribed for diabetics, especially because of the high amount of nutrients that it contains. A large portion of red grapes for diabetics contain just 52 calories. This serving of red grapes likewise contains around 11.69 grams of sugar. In this, 0.11 grams is sucrose, glucose is of 5.43 grams and Fructose is 6.14 grams. These likewise contain a little measure of fiber that can help your wellbeing. Green grapes a Continue reading >>

The Right Way To Eat Grapes For Each Type Of Diabetes

The Right Way To Eat Grapes For Each Type Of Diabetes

Grapes are one of the most popular fruits on the planet thanks to their varieties, flavor, texture, and portability. They provide numerous health benefits most of which are supported by scientific studies. They are related to prevention of heart disease, constipation, high blood pressure, and even cancer thanks to their rich content of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other nutrients. What’s more, they provide powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, and anti-aging properties. However, are they good for people with diabetes? What is their effect on blood sugar and how much is safe to eat for these people? Here’s everything you need to know about grapes and diabetes. Grapes and Diabetes All fruits contain fructose and glucose, but this doesn’t mean that a person with diabetes should avoid them completely. In contrary, they should consume fruits in moderate amounts as they provide numerous health benefits, but on the recommendation of a dietician or doctor. In fact, fruits are an important part of the meal plan of people with diabetes, including grapes. Besides containing naturally occurring sugars, red grapes also have a high content of fiber which slows down the absorption of nutrients in your body. This, in turn, prevent the occurrence of spikes in your blood glucose. Fibers don’t raise your blood sugar, unlike carbs and sugars. How Much to Eat Red and black grapes have highly nutritional content which is why the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends them for people with diabetes. You can have about 3 servings per day, which equals to 1 serving with each meal. There are only 52 calories and 11.69 gr of sugar in ½ a cup of red grapes. However, 5.43 gr of this amount is glucose, 0.11 gr is sucrose, and 6.14 gr are fructose. A Continue reading >>

Is Red Wine Good For Diabetics? Study Claims The Tipple’s Main Antioxidant Can Help Reduce Artery Stiffness For Type 2 Sufferers

Is Red Wine Good For Diabetics? Study Claims The Tipple’s Main Antioxidant Can Help Reduce Artery Stiffness For Type 2 Sufferers

Many people count a glass of red wine as one of their guilty pleasures. Yet, drinking the occasional Merlot may protect type 2 diabetes patients from heart attacks and strokes. Researchers have found an antioxidant, known as resveratrol, in red wine reduces artery stiffness in type 2 diabetics, which is a known cause of heart-related illness. Study author Dr Naomi Hamburg, chief of vascular biology, Boston University School of Medicine, said: 'This adds to emerging evidence that there may be interventions that may reverse the blood vessel abnormalities that occur with aging and are more pronounced in people with type 2 diabetes and obesity.' Resveratrol is found in the skin of red grapes and gives wine its color. It is also found in peanuts and berries. Researchers from Boston University measured the stiffness of the body's main artery, known as the aorta, in 57 type 2 diabetes patients. Patients then consumed daily doses of 100mg resveratrol for two weeks, followed by a 300mg dose every day for a fortnight and finally a placebo for four weeks. Of those with high aortic stiffness at the start of the study, the 300mg dose improved flexibility by 9.1 percent and the 100mg dose by 4.8 percent, while stiffness worsened with placebo. This effect was not seen in patients without aortic stiffness at the start of the study. Dr Hamburg said: 'The effect of resveratrol may be more about improving structural changes in the aorta and less about the relaxation of blood vessels, and people with more normal aortic stiffness may not get as much benefit. Results will be presented at the Peripheral Vascular Disease 2017 Scientific Sessions in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This comes after Professor Gordon Shepherd from the Yale School of Medicine said drinking red wine sparks reactions in the Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Red Grapes As A Diabetic?

Can I Eat Red Grapes As A Diabetic?

In the past, diabetics were advised to avoid fruit due to the sugar content, but modern diabetes diets allow fruit as a part of an overall healthy and balanced meal plan. Diabetics need to maintain strict control over blood sugar levels and try not to consume unhealthy foods that can lead to diabetes complications. Video of the Day A diabetes diet should focus on controlling diabetes symptoms as well as preventing complications common to the disease. For most diabetics, this means eating a high-fiber diet that is low in fat, especially saturated fat. Saturated fat can contribute to arterial plaques, a common complication for diabetics. Diabetics need to limit carbohydrates, especially sweet foods that raise blood sugar. Eating carbohydrates in moderation and along with something containing protein is a good way to keep blood sugar under control. In general, two to three handfuls of fruit a day should be fine for most diabetics and grapes can be included in this fruit allotment. Red Grapes and Carbohydrates For a diabetic, eating foods with a lot of carbohydrates can send blood sugar soaring. Fortunately, fiber, protein and fat can mitigate this response. In one method of diabetic dieting, the diabetic limits carbohydrates at each meal to a specific amount based on his own typical blood sugar responses and any medication and insulin he might be taking. According to the American Diabetes Association, most diabetics can start off with around 45 to 60 g of carbohydrates per meal and adjust as necessary. In 10 grapes, there are about 8.8 g of carbohydrates. About 0.4 g is fiber and 7.6 g is made up of sugars. Some diabetics use the glycemic index to decide what they should eat. The glycemic index indicates how fast and high blood sugar rises in response to a particular carbo Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Glycemic Response To Grapes Or Grape Products1,2

Type 2 Diabetes And Glycemic Response To Grapes Or Grape Products1,2

Abstract Type 2 diabetes affects ∼7% of the population in the United States and is characterized by decreased disposal of glucose in peripheral tissues due to insulin resistance and overproduction of glucose by the liver, defects in pancreatic β-cell function, and decreased β-cell mass. Obesity, decreased physical exercise, and consumption of foods with a high glycemic index (GI) and load are major predisposing factors in the development of type 2 diabetes. The GI is used to evaluate the rise in blood glucose levels in response to food. The GI provides an indication of the quality of carbohydrate in a food. The glycemic load (GL) is used to provide information about the quantity of carbohydrates in a food and the insulin demand. Individuals with diabetes are advised to maintain a diet of low-GL foods, because low-GL diets improve diabetes symptoms. Grapes have a mean GI and GL in the low range. Little research has been performed with grapes and/or grape products to determine the glycemic response either alone or with a meal. Grapes and other fruits contain numerous polyphenols, including the stilbene resveratrol, the flavanol quercetin, catechins, and anthocyanins that have shown potential for reducing hyperglycemia, improving β-cell function, and protecting against β-cell loss. Therefore, with a low mean GI and GL, grapes or grape products may provide health benefits to type 2 diabetics. Continue reading >>

Fruit List For Diabetics

Fruit List For Diabetics

Often people suffering from diabetes avoid fruits out of fear that the sugar present in fruits could push up their blood sugar level. However, this is a false conception. Most fruits, specifically fruits rich in fibers, are beneficial for reducing the blood sugar level. Sugar present in fruits is usually in the form of fructose. Unlike other forms of sugar, such as sucrose, fructose has low glucemic index. Minimal insulin is needed for the metabolism of fructose. Intake of this fruit sugar is not associated with sudden surge of the blood sugar level. Studies have shown that by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride production, fructose could protect us from diseases such as arteriosclerosis, which leads to heart diseases and stroke. Diabetes bad food includes those that have high glycemic indexes for glucose- which includes those foods that are high in saturated fats and uncontrollably high amounts of sugar in any of its forms- especially sugar from milk. Which brings us back to our main concern- what kinds of fruits can a diabetic eat? Fruits for diabetics are usually those fruits that have high fiber content and have low sugar content. If we take these criteria and apply it, the first fruit that would come to mind would be the high and mighty avocado. But beware; the large avocados have a lot of calories in it- so if you buy the large avocado from florida, make sure you regulate your calorie intake for the rest of the day. Diabetics should NOT eat cooked fruit. Always eat raw fruits in order to reap the benefits. Here's a list of fruits that are beneficial for Diabetics. Any type of wild or organic berry - Seasons: Range All Year Blueberries, Elderberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Strawberries etc. There are loads to choose from. You can find their respective season Continue reading >>

Are Grapes And/or Grape Juice Bad For People With Type 2 Diabetes?

Are Grapes And/or Grape Juice Bad For People With Type 2 Diabetes?

A: No, grapes and grape juice are not “bad” for people with diabetes. Grapes are actually rich in phytonutrients, nutrients that are thought to play a role in disease prevention, cognitive function and immunity. However, it’s important to keep in mind that all fruit and fruit juices contain carbohydrate. People with diabetes need to control their carbohydrate intake. A “serving” of grapes is about 17; a serving of grape juice is 1/3 of a cup. Depending on your carbohydrate goals for your meals and snacks, you should be able to fit grapes and/or grape juice into your eating plan, but you’ll need to keep an eye on your portion. Also, it’s generally recommended that one eat whole fruit instead of drinking juice. Drinking juice is less satisfying than eating fruit, and some people find that it raises blood glucose levels rather quickly. Continue reading >>

Orange-grape Pills May Lower Blood Sugar

Orange-grape Pills May Lower Blood Sugar

Overweight people who took a capsule for eight weeks that contained two compounds found in red grapes and oranges saw improvements in blood sugar levels and artery function, researchers report. “This is an incredibly exciting development and could have a massive impact on our ability to treat these diseases,” says Paul Thornalley, a professor in systems biology at the University of Warwick Medical School. “As well as helping to treat diabetes and heart disease, it could defuse the obesity time bomb.” When participants received both compounds—trans-resveratrol (tRES) in red grapes and hesperetin (HESP) in oranges—at pharmaceutical doses, the compounds acted in tandem to decrease blood glucose, improve the action of insulin, and boost the health of arteries. “As well as helping to treat diabetes and heart disease, it could defuse the obesity time bomb.” After eight weeks on the treatment, researchers noted an improvement in insulin resistance in trial participants that was similar to improvements seen six months after bariatric surgery. The compounds work by increasing a protein called glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) in the body that neutralizes a damaging sugar-derived compound called methylglyoxal (MG). For the study, researchers increased Glo1 expression in cell culture and then tested the formulation in a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial. Thirty-two overweight and obese people between the ages of 18 and 80 age who had a BMI between 25 to 40 took part in the trial. They were given the supplement in capsule form once a day for eight weeks. They were asked to maintain their usual diet and their food intake was monitored via a dietary questionnaire. They were also asked not to alter their daily physical activity. Changes to their sugar levels we Continue reading >>

These Are The Best Fruits For Preventing Diabetes

These Are The Best Fruits For Preventing Diabetes

In a study published in the BMJ in July 2013, researchers from Harvard University found that eating whole fruits can reduce the risk of developing type-2 diabetes, but some are more effective than others at warding off the disease. The report used data from three long-running health studies that included 151,209 women and 36,173 men, where participants sent back questionnaires about their lifestyle, diet, and health — specifically any diseases they'd developed — every few years for at least two decades. The researchers asked about 10 fruits: grapes or raisins, peaches, plums or apricots, prunes, bananas, cantaloupe, apples or pears, oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, and blueberries. Blueberries were most effective in preventing diabetes, followed by grapes and then apples. Bananas and grapefruit were also good. Strawberries did not have much of an effect and cantaloupe slightly increased the risk for type 2 diabetes. See the chart below: BMJ On the flip side, drinking all kinds of fruit juice, including apple, orange, and grapefruit, was associated with a higher risk of the disease. Replacing three servings of fruit juice each week with blueberries decreased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 33% on average, according to the study. People with type 2 diabetes do not make enough of the hormone insulin, which pulls sugar (glucose) out of the bloodstream and into our cells to be stored and released later. Without enough insulin, bloodsugar hits spikes and troughs. Researchers suggest that blueberries, red grapes, and apples may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes because they contain high levels of anthocyanins, which have been shown to increase glucose uptake in mice with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Can Wine Treat Diabetes?

Can Wine Treat Diabetes?

Red wine, you do more than make us feel fine: In addition to helping protect our tickers, the skin of red grapes—specifically the natural chemical compound resveratrol—may actually help diabetics regulate their blood sugar, according to new research in the journal Nutrition Research. Researchers in India recruited 62 people being treated for Type 2 diabetes, and gave half of them a 250-milligram resveratrol supplement once a day for three months. The results? Those who took the supplement had lower blood glucose levels than those who didn’t. Plus, the resveratrol-takers also had significant decreases in total cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. More from Prevention.com: 12 Ways To Never Get Diabetes Why? The reason isn’t clear, but the researchers say resveratrol may help stimulate insulin secretion or activate a protein that helps regulate glucose and insulin sensitivity. (Learn more about the wonders of red wine with It’s The Red, Not The Wine.) While the results certainly sound promising, don’t run out and buy a supplement just yet, says Rita Kalyani, MD, an endocrinologist and diabetes researcher at John Hopkins. More research needs to be done before doctors would consider recommending it, she says. And hitting up the liquor store in the hopes that red wine can control your blood sugar isn’t a good bet either: Red wine only contains up to 14 milligrams of resveratrol per liter, while study participants consumed 250 milligrams a day via a supplement. “You would need to drink a case of red wine or eat bushels of grapes, and at that point, the negative effects of consuming such large amounts of alcohol or sugar would outweigh any potential benefit,” says Ava Port, MD, an endocrinologist and diabetes researcher at the University of Maryland. Botto Continue reading >>

Red-grapes-in-paper-bag

Red-grapes-in-paper-bag

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Yes, add me to your mailing list. Avocado Basil Basil and Diabetes Bicycle Bitter Melon Black Friday Breads Breakfast Cancer Cannellini Beans Christmas recipes Cinnamon Cycling Diabetes Control Diet Soda Exercise Fats Fitness Jackfruit Kiwi Lemons and Limes Leslie Sansone Low Carbohydrate Diet Metformin Myths Oats Passion Fruit Peanut Butter Peanuts Physical Activities Plant-Based Foods Plant-Based Proteins Preparing meals at home Probiotics ProForm 505 CST Treadmill Review Pumpkin Salmon Sauerkraut Soda Sweet Potatoes Tasmania and Blood Glucose Treadmills Turmeric Vinegar Water Continue reading >>

Are Red Seedless Grapes Okay For People With Diabetes?

Are Red Seedless Grapes Okay For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

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