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Recipes For Type 1 Diabetes

Low Carb Guide To Healthy Eating With Diabetes

Low Carb Guide To Healthy Eating With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions. It currently affects over 400 million people worldwide (1). Although diabetes is a complicated disease, maintaining good blood sugar control can greatly reduce the risk of complications (2, 3). One of the ways to achieve better blood sugar levels is to follow a low-carb diet. This article provides a detailed overview of low-carb diets for managing diabetes. What is Diabetes, and What Role Does Food Play? If you have diabetes, your body cannot process carbohydrates effectively. Normally, when you eat carbs, they are broken down into small units of glucose, which end up as blood sugar. When blood sugar levels go up, the pancreas responds by producing the hormone insulin. This hormone allows the blood sugar to enter cells. In healthy people, blood sugar levels remain within a narrow range throughout the day. In diabetes, however, this system doesn’t work the way it is supposed to. This is a big problem, because having both too high and too low blood sugar levels can cause severe harm. There are several types of diabetes, but the two most common ones are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both of these conditions can be diagnosed at any age. In type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune process destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Diabetics must inject insulin several times a day to ensure that glucose gets into the cells and stays at a healthy level in the bloodstream (4). In type 2 diabetes, the beta cells at first produce enough insulin, but the body’s cells are resistant to its action, so blood sugar remains high. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down. Over time, the beta cells lose their ability to produce enough insulin (5). Of the three nutrie Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes: Recipes For Success

Diet And Diabetes: Recipes For Success

Diabetes Basics In the past few years, much of what we thought we knew about diabetes has been turned on its head. New understanding of the nutritional causes of diabetes gives us the power to keep it from occurring or to turn it around. Here is what is supposed to happen: Our bodies turn starchy and sweet foods into glucose for our muscle cells to use for fuel. Insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, ushers glucose into the cells. People with type 2 diabetes, the most common type, generally have enough insulin. However, their cells become resistant to it, leaving too much glucose in the bloodstream, where it can cause problems. Over the short run, people with uncontrolled diabetes may feel tired, thirsty, urinate frequently, and notice blurred vision. In the long run, they are at risk for heart disease, kidney problems, vision loss, nerve damage, and other difficulties. Dietary Approaches to Diabetes Diabetes diets typically call for portion control, carbohydrate limits, and, for those who are overweight, calorie restrictions. Fortunately, there is another way. Low-fat, plant-based diets are ideal for diabetes and the conditions associated with it, such as heart disease, weight gain, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. And they offer the advantage of not requiring any weighing or measuring of portions. Going hungry is not necessary! The old approach recommended cutting down on carbohydrates. It’s true that overly processed carbohydrates—those made with sugar or white flour, for example—are poor choices. However, delicious unprocessed or minimally processed foods, such as potatoes, rice, oats, beans, pasta, fruit, and vegetables, were the main part of the diet in countries where people were traditionally fit and trim and where diabetes was rare. Unfortunat Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

When you have a child with type 1 diabetes, it's easy to get carried away with the notion of a diabetic diet. But in reality, your child's dietary needs are no different from a child who doesn't have diabetes. Of course, there are certain considerations you need to be aware of, and understanding the carbohydrate content in food is arguably the most important. In this article, you will learn about the importance of carb counting, with a special emphasis on how fiber and sugar alcohols may also affect your child's blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Nutrition Basics There's really no such thing as a diabetic diet. That's why you should focus instead on providing your child with balanced nutrition. A good nutritional resource to consult is the Food Pyramid. In recent years, the United States Department of Agriculture has made some updates to the standard Food Pyramid that most of us grew up knowing. Instead of being a set-in-stone guideline, now you can create personalized eating plans that are flexible and balanced. To refresh your memory on healthy eating, visit ChooseMyPlate.gov. There are 3 main nutrients in foods—fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. These essential nutrients affect blood glucose in different ways. Fats: Fat typically doesn't break down into sugar in your blood, and in small amounts, it doesn't affect your blood glucose levels. But fat does slow down digestion, and this can cause your blood glucose to rise slower than it normally would. After a high-fat meal, your child's blood glucose may be elevated up to 12 hours after the meal. Proteins: Protein doesn't affect blood glucose unless you eat more than your body needs. In most cases, you need only about 6 ounces or less (which is about the size of 2 decks of cards) at each meal. Carbohydrates: Carbohyd Continue reading >>

My Child’s Low-carb Diet For Type 1 Diabetes

My Child’s Low-carb Diet For Type 1 Diabetes

“We avoid grains, gluten, starches, sugar and fruit,” explains Mia Nickels, mom to 7 year-old Holden who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes almost a year ago. “I sweeten with Stevia or Swerve. He is non-celiac gluten intolerant. We can always tell when he has gotten into some hidden gluten, because he will have a huge unexplained spike, his stomach will hurt, and within 24 hours he will develop a rash around his mouth and on his cheeks.” For beverages, she says, “He usually drinks water with all meals — sometimes with Stur added (a zero-calorie flavor product). Occasionally he’ll have Zevia soda. I sneak protein powder into a lot of things, too. Shhh…don’t tell!” One major aspect of Holden’s success in his low-carb diet is his mom’s passionate effort in baking him gluten-free (GF) and low-carb (LC) treats based on various recipes, many of which she posts to her Facebook page (and his favorite donut recipe included below). You can find many of Mia’s recipes with each photo on her Facebook page. Holden’s Low-Carb Diet: Breakfast: 2 eggs fried in coconut oil, bacon with melted cheese, and half a LC bagel with Kerrygold butter or almond flour waffle sticks with butter and Waldon Farms syrup, and bacon with melted cheese. Snack: Cheese, LC/GF brownie, or LC chocolate meringues Lunch: Lunchmeat rolls (ham, turkey and chive cream cheese) or GF meatballs in LC tomato sauce, LC/GF bagel sandwich (piled up with lunchmeat, cheese and mustard), LC chicken wings, Mexican chicken soup accompanied with a celery, raw broccoli, and nuts. I usually send a LC baked treat or two pieces of Chocorite, too. Snack: A few of his daily snack options include nuts, cheese, HWC hot chocolate, TrueLemon Jello, Nori/Ham wraps, raw veggies with guacamole dip, or a baked tre Continue reading >>

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

If you are a caregiver for someone with type 1 diabetes, you know that a healthy diet and proper food preparation are an important part of controlling diabetes. "You don't need to buy special foods,” advises Sue Tocher, MS, RD, dietitian and diabetes clinical program coordinator at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. “You should prepare the same healthy foods that would be recommended for someone without diabetes. That means plenty of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and a low concentration of fats and sweets." Diabetes: Food and Blood Glucose Levels It's important for diabetics to keep their glucose from getting too low or too high. This is achieved by regularly checking blood glucose levels and regulating insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake. It's best to eat about the same amount of carbohydrates each day, eat and snack at regular hours, and avoid skipping meals. "Carbohydrates are the most important food group for diabetics,” says Tocher. “These are the foods that impact glucose levels. Fats and proteins supply calories but have little effect on blood glucose." Foods that contain lots of carbs include bagels, crackers, dried beans and peas, fruit, pasta and rice, and of course, sweets. Diabetes: The Food Pyramid The diabetes food pyramid illustrates how to make the best food choices. The pyramid has six color-coded categories, each representing a different food group. "The idea of the food pyramid is to get you to eat from a variety of food groups,” says Tocher. “The foods closest to the bottom are the foods that are closest to their natural state, such as whole grains, fresh vegetables, beans, and fresh fruit. You want to get your calories from the bottom up." Foods from the bottom also provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Moving up the pyramid, as t Continue reading >>

Recipes

Recipes

These recipes have been adapted from safefood with information tailored to those with Diabetes. Check out the food and diabetes section on the website for more information and background to healthy eating for diabetes. You will find that some of these recipes include sugar and that the traffic light system indicates red, as the recipe may be high in sugars but this does not mean that they can’t be included as part of a balanced diet. We are trying to increase awareness that having diabetes does not mean you must follow a diet that restricts sugar, as this is not the case. Small amounts of sugar are fine, particularly if they are combined with foods that are high in fibre. Desserts, biscuits and confectionery are not forbidden but because these are also usually high in calories, fat and sugar, people with diabetes should only have these occasionally. Continue reading >>

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Eating a diabetes-friendly diet can help keep your blood sugar levels under control. But it can be difficult to stick to a regular meal plan — unless you have a plan in place. Check out these 21 delicious, diabetes-friendly recipes to use for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Remember to stay within your carbohydrate allowance by noting the carb content and serving size of the recipes. Also, be sure to balance your meals with lean protein and healthy plant fats. Breakfast: Cream Cheese-Stuffed French Toast This may sound too decadent for breakfast, but paired with scrambled egg whites, it can fit into a diabetes-friendly meal plan. Whole grain toast will help ensure you get your daily fiber too. Lunch: Salmon Salad with White Beans Salmon is one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and is also a delicious topper to workday salad. Dinner: Cuban-Marinated Sirloin Kabobs with Grilled Asparagus Spice things up with this flavorful skewer. Dried herbs and spices are a great way to pack a punch of flavor without adding unnecessary calories and fat. Breakfast: Apple Pie Oatmeal with Greek Yogurt Who wouldn’t like a slice of pie for breakfast? This oatmeal will leave your kitchen smelling like the flavors of fall, and your stomach happy and satisfied. Add some extra plain Greek yogurt on top for more protein. Lunch: Turkey-Cranberry Wraps Turkey and cranberry sauce isn’t just for Thanksgiving! This is an easy grab-and-go lunch that even your kids will enjoy. Note: This recipe may not be appropriate for all people with type 2 diabetes, because it contains 60 grams of carbs per serving. You can adjust the amount of cranberry sauce to lower the carb count. Dinner: Cilantro-Lime Tilapia with Spinach and Tomatoes Take a trip to the tropics with this fast fish dish. Breakfast Continue reading >>

3 Recipes For A Happy T1d Thanksgiving

3 Recipes For A Happy T1d Thanksgiving

Chef Lourdes Castro shares tips for getting the most out of the biggest food day of the year. At first glance, Thanksgiving can feel like a culinary minefield for people with Type 1 diabetes. The thinking is that you have to either use a truckload of insulin to cover for the carb fest of mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, and pie, or you have to avoid it altogether. Worse, people with diabetes can feel like the odd person out during the festivities; well-meaning relatives might have trouble resisting the urge to police the Thanksgiving dinner plate of someone with diabetes, which can get real awkward real quick. Noted chef Lourdes Castro advocates for a different way of thinking about Thanksgiving with diabetes, one that feels more like a win-win for everyone involved. Thanksgiving actually already is predisposed to be more accessible for people with Type 1 diabetes than many other traditional meals, as the centerpiece of the meal is a baked source of protein, says Castro, a cookbook author, dietician, and adjunct professor. Also, the American diet is shifting to be more in line with the optimal diet for people with diabetes, she adds, with more protein and fresh vegetables and less empty carbs. I think diabetes-friendly food is healthy food that anyone can and should be eating, Castro says. Castro is partnering with Novo Nordisk to help the diabetes supply company to relaunch its Cornerstones4Care initiative, which helps provide educational information for people with Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. As part of the initiative, Castro has released a free downloadable bilingual cookbook . You can view a few of the cookbooks recipes below. In an interview with Insulin Nation, Castro suggested a few Thanksgiving eating tips that can help you enjoy Thanksgiving while ke Continue reading >>

Best Diabetic Diet Tips For Type 2 Diabetes - What You Need To Know For Diabetes Management

Best Diabetic Diet Tips For Type 2 Diabetes - What You Need To Know For Diabetes Management

Not only are 86 million Americans prediabetic, but 90% of them don't even know they have it, the Centers for Disease Control reports. What's more, doctors diagnose as many as 1.5 million new cases of diabetes each year, according to the American Diabetes Association . Whether you're at risk, prediabetic or following a diabetic diet as suggested by your doctor, a few simple strategies can help control blood sugar and potentially reverse the disease entirely. Plus, implementing just a few of these dietary changes can have other beneficial effects like weight loss, all without sacrificing flavor or feeling deprived. There are two main forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that's usually diagnosed during childhood . Environmental and genetic factors can lead to the destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That's the hormone responsible for delivering glucose (sugar) to your cells for metabolism and storage. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adulthood and caused by a variety of lifestyle factors like obesity, physical inactivity and high cholesterol. Typically, type 2 diabetics still have functioning beta cells, meaning that they're still producing insulin. However, the peripheral tissues become less sensitive to the hormone, and the liver produces more glucose, causing high blood sugar. When left unmanaged, type 2 diabetics may stop producing insulin altogether. While you may have some symptoms of high blood sugar (nausea, lethargy, frequent thirst and/or urination), a clinical diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes requires a repeat test of your blood sugar levels. Unlike many other health conditions, the incredible thing about type 2 diabetes is that it can be controlled and reversed with lifestyle Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

Popular Recipes

Popular Recipes

Award-winning cookbook authors Frances Towner Giedt and Bonnie Sanders Polin, PhD, created hundreds of diabetes-friendly recipes featured in our recipe center. The duo also authored The Joslin Diabetes Gourmet Cookbook—the only diabetes cookbook to have ever won the prestigious James Beard Award. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

What Is A Balanced Diet For Diabetes?

What Is A Balanced Diet For Diabetes?

What is a healthy , balanced diet for Diabetes ? From Diabetes UK Whether you are living with diabetes or not, eating well is important. The foods you choose to eat in your daily diet make a difference not only to managing diabetes , but also to how well you feel and how much energy you have every day. How much you need to eat and drink is based on your age, gender, how active you are and the goals you are looking to achieve. Portion sizes have grown in recent years, as the plates and bowls we use have got bigger. Use smaller crockery to cut back on your portion sizes, while making the food on your plate look bigger. No single food contains all the essential nutrients you need in the right proportion. Thats why you need to consume foods from each of the main food groups to eat well. Naturally low in fat and calories and packed full of vitamins, minerals and fibre, fruit and vegetables add flavour and variety to every meal. They may also help protect against stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers. Try: adding an extra handful of vegetables to your dishes when cooking peas to rice, spinach to lamb or onions to chicken. Potatoes, rice, pasta, bread, chapattis, naan and plantain all contain carbohydrate, which is broken down into glucose and used by your cells as fuel. Better options of starchy foods such as wholegrain bread, wholewheat pasta and basmati, brown or wild rice contain more fibre, which helps to keep your digestive system working well. They are generally more slowly absorbed (that is, they have a lower glycaemic index, or GI), keeping you feeling fuller for longer. Try: potatoes any way you like but dont fry them with the skin left on for valuable fibre. Milk, cheese and yogurt contain calcium, which is vital for growing children as it kee Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

It's important to eat a healthy diet when you have type 1 diabetes. That doesn't mean you can't enjoy tasty food, including some of your favorites. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops making insulin. So you take insulin every day either through shots or a pump. It’s also key to track your blood sugar levels. Insulin is only part of the picture. Diet and exercise also play important roles in helping keep your blood sugar levels stable. When you make healthy food choices and eat consistent amounts through the day, it can help control your sugars. It can also lower your chance of diabetes-related problems like heart disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. Some experts used to think there was a "diabetes diet." They thought people with diabetes had to avoid all foods with sugars or stop eating certain other foods. But when you have type 1, you can eat the same healthy diet as everyone else. Follow some general guidelines: Eat less unhealthy fat. Cut back on the saturated fats you find in high-fat meats like bacon and regular ground beef, as well as full-fat dairy like whole milk and butter. Unhealthy fats raise your chance of heart disease. With diabetes, you face higher-than-average odds of getting heart disease. Make smart food choices to lower that risk. Get enough fiber. It may help control your blood sugar. You can get fiber from whole grains, beans, and fruits and vegetables. Try to get 25-30 grams a day. Those high-fiber foods are always better choices than low-fiber carbs such as refined 'white' grains and processed sugary foods. Carbohydrates are your body's main source of energy. You get them from many foods, like grains (pasta, bread, crackers, and cookies), fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and sugars. Carbs raise your blood sugar levels faster than Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Recipes - T1d Living - A Type 1 Diabetes Blog

Recipes - T1d Living - A Type 1 Diabetes Blog

Since beingdiagnosed withCeliac's disease I've had to find gluten free alternatives to some of my favorite foods,like banana bread. And as most of you with Celiac's disease or agluten intoleranceknow, Breakfast is easily my favorite meal of the day! And although I rarely depart from my beloved egg and sausage breakfast, I do love to sprinkle in variety. What I Medical Alert ID and Oatless Low Carb Oatmeal Hello my dear friends! Hows it going over there? Its always this time of year that I feel super ambitious to start tackling my goals. Maybe thats because the cold Man does it feel good to be back in my normal routine! As much as taking a break and slowing things down felt good (and was much needed) there is Mmmm Gravy. Gravy is one of my favorite parts about Thanksgiving. It goes great over everything turkey, carrots, stuffing, meat pie, mashed potatoes the list goes on. But the problem Hi! How is your Tuesday going so far and how was your weekend? We had a very active Saturday because we were still picking up the yard from the Fall Stuck in a low-carb paleo breakfast rut? Dont worry, youre not alone. I'm always on the search for low-carb paleo breakfast ideas. Not only do they need to be low-carb Helloooooo How are you?Last Sunday was the second Patriots game of the season and I made THE BEST chicken nuggets that I have to share with you guys. And it Even before diabetes, I was never one to drink soda or sugary drinks. I thought I was being healthy by drinking sugar-free drinks like Crystal Light and sugar-free iced tea. Continue reading >>

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