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Recipes For Type 1 Diabetes

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

This 1,200-calorie meal plan makes it easy to follow a diabetes diet with healthy and delicious foods that help to balance blood sugar. The simple meals and snacks in this 7-day plan feature complex carbohydrates (think whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables), lean protein and healthy fats. We limited refined carbohydrates (like white bread, white pasta and white rice) as well as added sugars, which can spike your blood sugar quickly. We've also cut back on saturated fats and sodium, as they can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be difficult—choose a variety of nutritious foods, as we do in this meal plan, and add in daily exercise for a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Day 1 Breakfast (294 calories, 41 g carbohydrates) • 1/2 cup oats cooked in 1/2 cup each 2% milk and water • 1 medium plum, chopped • 4 walnut halves, chopped Top oats with plum and walnuts. A.M. Snack (96 calories, 18 g carbohydrates) • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1/4 nonfat plain Greek yogurt Top blueberries with yogurt. Lunch (319 calories, 37 g carbohydrates) Turkey & Apple Cheddar Melt • 2 slices whole-wheat bread • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard, divided • 1/2 medium apple, sliced • 2 oz. low-sodium deli turkey • 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided • 1 cup mixed greens Top one slice of bread with 1 tsp. mustard, apple, turkey and 1 Tbsp. cheese. Top the other Continue reading >>

Popular Recipes

Popular Recipes

Award-winning cookbook authors Frances Towner Giedt and Bonnie Sanders Polin, PhD, created hundreds of diabetes-friendly recipes featured in our recipe center. The duo also authored The Joslin Diabetes Gourmet Cookbook—the only diabetes cookbook to have ever won the prestigious James Beard Award. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

30-minute Meals—all Diabetes-friendly!

30-minute Meals—all Diabetes-friendly!

Cooking a diabetes-friendly meal doesn't have to be a time-consuming endeavor that traps you in the kitchen! Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prediabetic, or cook for someone who has diabetes, you know the importance of a healthy—and delicious—dish. We make it easy: These dinner recipes can be prepared, cooked, and served in 30 minutes or less. See 10 of our favorites now! Tandoori is an Indian term used to describe a method of cooking meats quickly over relatively high heat. The sweet mango-pear-cherry chutney not only perfectly compliments these spiced turkey cutlets, but it's also a great low-fat option that will help keep you slim. Antioxidant-packed tart cherries give the dish an extra healthful boost, too. See the full recipe! These simple grilled halibut fillets are chock-full of omega-3s, which reduce inflammation, a major risk factor for diabetes, and appear to improve insulin resistance. Let the flavor soar from average to extraordinary by topping each filet with a spoonful of roasted tomato and olive tapenade. See the full recipe! This small, corkscrew-shaped pasta gathers the rich taste of sauteed mushrooms, shallots, freshly grated Parmesan, and fiber-rich Swiss chard into its crevasses for a simple, healthy meal that tastes gourmet. See the full recipe! For a unique and flavorful twist on your standard stir-fried vegetables, toss them with fresh ginger, garlic, and sesame oil before throwing them into the wok or skillet. Top with seared shrimp for a satisfying dinner that boosts heart health: shrimp is high in vitamin B12, which may lower levels of homocysteine, a marker of heart disease risk. See the full recipe! If you're tired of your standby chili recipe, try swapping ground beef with chicken and adding veggies—chicken has half the Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Archives - Diabetic Recipes, Free Diabetes Magazine & More!

Type 1 Diabetes Archives - Diabetic Recipes, Free Diabetes Magazine & More!

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. This iframe contains the logic required to handle Ajax powered Gravity Forms. Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDNan award-winning RD, certified diabetes educator, and past national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, is the author of The African American Guide to Living Well With Diabetes, which received the Favorably Reviewed designation from the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and Eating Soulfully and Healthfully with Diabetes. Dr. Lori Shemek, PhD, CNC, CLC, the best-selling author of Fire-Up Your Fat Burn! and leading health and weight loss expert, is also known as The Inflammation Terminator. She has made it her mission to educate the public on the toxic effects of certain foods and lifestyle choices and how they create inflammation in the body. She is a leading authority on inflammation and its role in weight loss, preventing disease and optimizing health. Rebecca Bitzer MS, RD/LD, CEDRD is an award-winning Registered Dietitian, writer, speaker, blogger, and REBEL Dietitian business owner. Rebecca and her team of six Registered Dietitians have counseled thousands of clients struggling with diabetes for over twenty-five years. They work closely with each other along with internists, endocrinologists, therapists, and families. Maureen Sullivan RN, CDE has worked for many years as a Registered Nurse, most of them in emergency and trauma services. She is a Certified Emergency Nurse, Certified Diabetes Educator, and the former manager of a hospital stroke program. Maureens wealth of knowledge, passion for nursing and education, and ability to engage people makes her an excellent teacher and a captivating lecturer. Recently, Maureen has been concentrating on writi Continue reading >>

Easy Recipes: One-dish Dinners

Easy Recipes: One-dish Dinners

Diabetic Living / Diabetic Recipes / 30 Minute These yummy one-dish recipes are super easy to prepare and even easier to clean up. Made with a diabetic menu in mind, our meal-in-a-bowl recipes are nutritious and tasty, perfect for dinner tonight. This easy slow cooker meal is packed with protein -- and flavor. Chicken, corn, and carrots simmer with yummy spices, while homemade cornmeal dumplings make this one-pot meal extra tasty. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetic Meals , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Meals Made Easy This yummy meal-in-a-bowl recipe is great for using leftover beef steak or pot roast. Bonus: The lean beef brings 26 grams of protein per serving to the dinner. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetic Meals , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Meals Made Easy Orzo Chicken Salad with Avocado-Lime Dressing This healthy chicken recipe uses just six ingredients, and the DIY dressing is made with just four. Serve with red sweet pepper strips and no-sugar-added canned mandarin oranges. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetic Meals , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Meals Made Easy Learn the secrets to smart grocery shopping and food prep with our handy guide for cooking right. Find tasty ways to cut carbs (cauliflower crust!) and our favorite tricks for adding flavor with less salt and fat. Buy this special edition from Diabetic Living. Get your copy today! Continue reading >>

[management Of Type 1 Diabetes (insulin, Diet, Sport):

[management Of Type 1 Diabetes (insulin, Diet, Sport): "dorchy's Recipes"].

1. Rev Med Brux. 2010;31(2 Suppl):S37-53. [Management of type 1 diabetes (insulin, diet, sport): "Dorchy's recipes"]. (1)Clinique de Diabtologie, Hpital Universitaire Des Enfants Reine Fabiola, ULB, Bruxelles. [email protected] The principal aims of therapeutic management of the child, adolescent and adultwith type 1 diabetes are to allow good quality of life and to avoid long-termcomplications by maintaining blood glucose concentrations close to the normalrange and an HbA1c level under 7%. The number of daily insulin injections, 2 or >or = 4, by itself does not necessarily give better results, but the 4-injectionregimen allows greater freedom, taking into account that the proper insulinadjustment is difficult before adolescence. Successful glycemic control in young patients depends mainly on the quality and intensity of diabetes education. Anydogmatism must be avoided. Due to their pharmakokinetic characteristics,fast-acting and long-acting insulin analogues have specific indications in boththe twice-daily injection regimen and the basal-bolus insulin therapy. Theyimprove quality of life, without necessarily reducing HbA1c. Dietaryrecommendations issued over the last few years are the same for diabetic andnon-diabetic individuals in order to avoid degenerative diseases. In thetwice-daily free-mix regimen, the allocation of carbohydrates throughout the day is essential. There is no linear correlation between the metabolization of xgrams of glucose by y units of insulin and carbohydrate counting is a piece ofnonsense. Glycamic changes during exercise depend largely on blood insulinlevels. In the young diabetic, during insulin deficiency, and therefore in a poordegree of metabolic control, i.e. hyperglycemic and ketotic, exercise accentuateshyperglycemia and ketosis, lea Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Mini Omelets

Low-carbohydrate Mini Omelets

Need an easy breakfast recipe that is low carb, kid friendly and easy to make? When you are preparing meals for someone with diabetes, it is easy to get caught up in the list of things that need to be avoided or consumed in moderation. Don’t get me wrong, that list is quite lengthy, but the good news is that the list of healthy foods that are also low in carbohydrates and even zero carbohydrates is pretty hefty as well. When I meal plan complete meals for my type-1 diabetic son, I am always trying to incorporate low and zero carbohydrate options. When the entire meal consists of these foods, I feel as though I have won the lottery. Take these mini omelets for example; they are made with eggs, milk, veggies, meat of choice, and topped with shredded cheddar cheese. All of these ingredients have either low or zero carbohydrates. I cooked mine in a brownie pan, and they became perfect individual portions! Each square has a pretty even amount of eggs, milk, veggies, meat, and cheese; each individual serving is virtually carbohydrate free. For insulin dosage purposes, I calculate one portion as 2 carbohydrates. I’ve found a brand of bread with as little as 7 grams of carbohydrates, so I add a piece of toast, making the entire meal roughly 9 carbohydrates. Include some fresh blueberries, strawberries, apple slices, or yogurt, and you still have a very low-carbohydrate meal. Make these for breakfast, brunch, or pack them for lunch. Low-Carbohydrate Mini Omelets makes 12 individual portions in muffin tins or brownie squares. Ingredients 12 eggs 3/4 c. milk Veggies (green pepper, red pepper, onions, mushrooms, tomatoes, etc.) Meat (diced ham, turkey sausage, bacon, etc.) Shredded cheddar cheese (for topping) Instructions Whisk together milk and eggs. Pour into the 12 wells, f Continue reading >>

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

Indulge in these diabetic-friendly dishes Not all low-carb, low-sugar meals have to be tasteless. Check out this collection of recipes to find a dish perfect for every course. Applesauce Pancakes Trading butter for applesauce is a healthy way to cut out excess fat and still enjoy the sweetness of pancakes. Try this recipe: Applesauce Pancakes Continue reading >>

A Guide To Cooking For One

A Guide To Cooking For One

How to treat yourself right when dining on your own Everyone eats alone sometimes. Whether your usual companion is out of town for a few days or you live by yourself and often dine on your own, there's no need to resort to wolfing down a bowl of cereal over the kitchen sink when you could be eating in style. This month we offer tips and techniques for making single servings work, from planning to shopping to the final product. While it may seem at first like a lot of trouble to prepare a complete meal for one, the results are well worth it. Homemade dishes are usually more nutritious and economical than restaurant meals. Cooking well for yourself can also be an important way to make your own health and happiness a priority. In other words: You're worth it. It may also be helpful to think of preparing dinner less as a chore than as a way to relax and de-stress. You can try out different recipes at your leisure without the pressure of others' approval. And you get to choose your favorite foods, since you are the only one you have to please. Begin the process by setting the mood. Make an effort to establish a dividing line between the day's activities and dinnertime. Set a place at the table with your favorite linen. Turn off the television, turn on the music, light a candle or two, maybe have a glass of wineand enjoy taking care of yourself. Planning makes a huge difference when it comes to healthy eating. That's certainly true for big families, but it may be even more so for individuals and couples. Set a goal to plan menus for a week at a time. Don't like the idea of leftovers? Think of them as "planned overs" instead: A small roast prepared on a Sunday, for example, could serve as an open-face sandwich on Monday and a vegetable stir-fry with small amounts of beef on T Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

It's not always easy to follow your diabetes meal plan day after day, but these delicious recipes may help. Appetizer recipes Beverage recipes Bread recipes Breakfast recipes Dessert recipes Main dish recipes Salad recipes Sandwich recipes Sauce and dressing recipes Side dish recipes Soup recipes Vegetable recipes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Recipes: The Best Places To Find Them Online

Diabetes Recipes: The Best Places To Find Them Online

Medically reviewed by Peggy Pletcher, MS, RD, LD, CDE on March 16, 2016 Written by Anna Schaefer When someone in your household is diagnosed with diabetes, life changes for everyone. One of the more difficult adjustments occurs in the kitchen, where meals must now be prepared with their potential blood sugar effects always at the top of your mind. Whether youre the cook or the one with diabetes or both finding recipes that accommodate your dietary needs can cut meal prep frustration and boost mealtime enjoyment in a big way. Weve selected the top nine websites and tools that are making it easier to cook for diabetes. Check them out to find your next diabetes-friendly meal. Carolyn Ketchum was diagnosed with gestational diabetes while pregnant with her third child. Thats where her affinity for low-carb eating began, and it continues on All Day I Dream About Food today. She specializes in turning high-carb delights into low-carb recipes, proving you dont have to go without your favorites just because you have diabetes. Theres a lot of deliciousness to choose from, but were particularly enticed by Carolyns desserts, like her peanut butter Texas sheet cake . This one promises perfect proportions of cake and frosting with every bite! Caroline Potter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 20, but that didnt put a dent in her joy of cooking. Colorful Eats is a literal feast for your eyes, filled with enticing photography of some truly fantastic diabetes-friendly recipes. We are having serious cravings for her chipotle roasted acorn squash with prosciutto and pomegranates . The name of the recipe might seem daunting, but its actually pretty easy to put together, not to mention gorgeous to look at. If youre a big fan of cooking from scratch, Diabetic Foodie is the place to g Continue reading >>

Recipes

Recipes

These recipes have been adapted from safefood with information tailored to those with Diabetes. Check out the food and diabetes section on the website for more information and background to healthy eating for diabetes. You will find that some of these recipes include sugar and that the traffic light system indicates red, as the recipe may be high in sugars but this does not mean that they can’t be included as part of a balanced diet. We are trying to increase awareness that having diabetes does not mean you must follow a diet that restricts sugar, as this is not the case. Small amounts of sugar are fine, particularly if they are combined with foods that are high in fibre. Desserts, biscuits and confectionery are not forbidden but because these are also usually high in calories, fat and sugar, people with diabetes should only have these occasionally. Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes: Recipes For Success

Diet And Diabetes: Recipes For Success

Diabetes Basics In the past few years, much of what we thought we knew about diabetes has been turned on its head. New understanding of the nutritional causes of diabetes gives us the power to keep it from occurring or to turn it around. Here is what is supposed to happen: Our bodies turn starchy and sweet foods into glucose for our muscle cells to use for fuel. Insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, ushers glucose into the cells. People with type 2 diabetes, the most common type, generally have enough insulin. However, their cells become resistant to it, leaving too much glucose in the bloodstream, where it can cause problems. Over the short run, people with uncontrolled diabetes may feel tired, thirsty, urinate frequently, and notice blurred vision. In the long run, they are at risk for heart disease, kidney problems, vision loss, nerve damage, and other difficulties. Dietary Approaches to Diabetes Diabetes diets typically call for portion control, carbohydrate limits, and, for those who are overweight, calorie restrictions. Fortunately, there is another way. Low-fat, plant-based diets are ideal for diabetes and the conditions associated with it, such as heart disease, weight gain, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. And they offer the advantage of not requiring any weighing or measuring of portions. Going hungry is not necessary! The old approach recommended cutting down on carbohydrates. It’s true that overly processed carbohydrates—those made with sugar or white flour, for example—are poor choices. However, delicious unprocessed or minimally processed foods, such as potatoes, rice, oats, beans, pasta, fruit, and vegetables, were the main part of the diet in countries where people were traditionally fit and trim and where diabetes was rare. Unfortunat Continue reading >>

46 Chefs Share Healthy Cooking Tips For People With Diabetes

46 Chefs Share Healthy Cooking Tips For People With Diabetes

People with diabetes should cook their meats by baking, grilling, or broiling them for the most part. An occasional fried food should be balanced with a low carbohydrate option, such as a salad or other cooked vegetables. Meals should be well balanced, and include foods from all food groups. They also often have a “dyslipidemia.” In other words, the “bad” cholesterol, or LDL cholesterol is high, and the “good” cholesterol, or HDL cholesterol is low. Therefore, they should choose their fats wisely, and pick fats that are liquid at room temperature. These healthier oils include olive oil, safflower oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, and canola oil, among others. The idea is to increase the good cholesterol in your bloodstream, so that it takes the bad cholesterol out via your liver. Use olive oil or canola oil cooking spray instead of butter. People with diabetes should cook their vegetables ahead for the week if they have a busy schedule. That way, they will always have some vegetables that they like on hand to fill out their meal. They can also cook their meat or protein portions ahead. It’s best to be prepared, and have some of the foods you love already prepared on hand. That way, you don’t get tempted to go off your plan. When you make recipes, use low fat dairy products, as opposed to higher fat dairy products. Pick nonfat or 1 percent milk instead of 2 percent or whole milk, for example. Generally cook with less fat in your meals overall. Limit your fat servings to 1 per meal or a fat that is considered a healthier fat such as olive oil. Brush it on sweet potatoes, or whole wheat bread, along with some roasted garlic. When you pick your carbohydrate servings, pick whole grain products. Cook brown rice, or try whole wheat pasta. Cook pastas and rice a l Continue reading >>

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

If you are a caregiver for someone with type 1 diabetes, you know that a healthy diet and proper food preparation are an important part of controlling diabetes. "You don't need to buy special foods,” advises Sue Tocher, MS, RD, dietitian and diabetes clinical program coordinator at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. “You should prepare the same healthy foods that would be recommended for someone without diabetes. That means plenty of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and a low concentration of fats and sweets." Diabetes: Food and Blood Glucose Levels It's important for diabetics to keep their glucose from getting too low or too high. This is achieved by regularly checking blood glucose levels and regulating insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake. It's best to eat about the same amount of carbohydrates each day, eat and snack at regular hours, and avoid skipping meals. "Carbohydrates are the most important food group for diabetics,” says Tocher. “These are the foods that impact glucose levels. Fats and proteins supply calories but have little effect on blood glucose." Foods that contain lots of carbs include bagels, crackers, dried beans and peas, fruit, pasta and rice, and of course, sweets. Diabetes: The Food Pyramid The diabetes food pyramid illustrates how to make the best food choices. The pyramid has six color-coded categories, each representing a different food group. "The idea of the food pyramid is to get you to eat from a variety of food groups,” says Tocher. “The foods closest to the bottom are the foods that are closest to their natural state, such as whole grains, fresh vegetables, beans, and fresh fruit. You want to get your calories from the bottom up." Foods from the bottom also provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Moving up the pyramid, as t Continue reading >>

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