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Recipes For Diabetics With High Blood Pressure And High Cholesterol

Mediterranean Recipes To Reduce Hypertension And Control Diabetes

Mediterranean Recipes To Reduce Hypertension And Control Diabetes

Mediterranean Recipes to Reduce Hypertension and Control Diabetes Mediterranean meals are typically loaded with vegetables and healthy fats great for someone trying to lower blood pressure, have a healthier heart or just enjoy eating good food! Who says eating right to lower blood pressure has to taste bland? Ill tell you one thing, it certainly wasnt us! This time, we are bringing you dishes of the Mediterranean that are so flavorful, the word healthy wont even cross your mind! Youll be lowering blood pressure without even knowing it. How great does that sound? A typicalMediterranean mealshiftsthe balance from lotsof meats, saturated fats to a greater percentage of vegetables, healthy fats, and whole grains.Eating meals that are heavier on the vegetableside than on the meat side plays a huge factor in lowering cholesterol, blood sugar and hypertension. Of course, we understand making this switch all at oncecan be a bit rough so try tomake the change gradually. Replaceone meal a week with a Mediterranean dish or if you cant do that, than add a half cup of broccoli, beans, artichokes or other green vegetableto everymeal. Your body will start craving those veggies in no time if you give it a chance! Eating aMediterranean diet bringsmany benefits, includingthe best parts fromtheDASH Diet A study has shown that eating typical Mediterranean dishes for several years canreduce the risks of developing heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure (hypertension), type 2 diabetes, Parkinsons disease and Alzheimers disease. Following the diet has also been linked with a reduced risk of early death and has proved a successful strategy for healthy weight reduction. The typical Mediterranean diet closely mirrorsthe DASH Diet. This way of eating contains theessential components that are Continue reading >>

Meals For Diabetics With High Cholesterol

Meals For Diabetics With High Cholesterol

The risk of heart disease is two to four times greater for people with diabetes. High blood cholesterol levels also increase your risk of heart disease. A healthy diet that includes nutritious foods in moderate amounts can help you control your blood sugars for diabetes and reduce your blood cholesterol levels. Video of the Day To control your blood sugars, you need to control the amount of carbohydrate-containing food, fruit, starch, yogurt and milk, you eat at each meal. The amount you need depends on your blood sugar goals and calorie needs. The American Diabetes Association says most people can start with 45 to 60 g carbohydrate per meal. To help lower blood cholesterol levels, you need to include foods high in fiber and limit the amount of saturated fats and trans fats in your diet. In addition to high-fiber foods, eat whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Choose lean cuts of meat and low-fat and nonfat dairy foods to limit your intake of saturated fat. Trans fats are primarily found in baked goods. To help control your blood sugars, try to eat at the same time each day. Eating regularly and consistently will also help control hunger for weight management. Maintaining a healthy weight can also help you keep both blood sugars and cholesterol levels under control. A heart-healthy breakfast for diabetes includes 1 cup hot cooked oatmeal with 2 tbsp. of raisins and 1 cup nonfat milk. Or, you can try two slices of whole wheat toast with 1 1/2 tsp. peanut butter, 1 1/4 cup of fresh strawberries and 6 oz. nonfat sugar-free yogurt. Including foods high in soluble fiber, such as pears and oranges, helps to lower blood cholesterol levels and slows digestion to allow for a slower release of sugar into the bloodstream. A diabetic lunch meal that may help lower blood cholesterol Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure 101

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure 101

Diabetic Living / Complications / Heart People with diabetes are at increased risk for high blood pressure even if they don't have any other risk factors. This is because having diabetes can damage your blood vessels, and if your blood vessels are damaged, it's harder for the blood to flow through them, causing your blood pressure to go up. But don't despair. Having diabetes doesn't mean that you are automatically destined for high blood pressure. Find out what blood pressure measurement is healthy for someone with diabetes. In addition, check out ways to lower your blood pressure by modifying your lifestyle. Reviewed by Terri Peiffer, RN, BSN, CDE, December 2008 High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, increases your risk for a heart attack or stroke regardless of whether you have diabetes. However, having diabetes is itself a risk factor for heart problems, so the recommended blood pressure for people with diabetes is different from the general public to allow for this additional risk. Blood pressure is how forcefully your blood moves through your blood vessels. If the blood moves with excessive force because your arteries are blocked or have narrowed, your blood pressure is higher and your heart has to work harder, which increases your risk for heart disease and for a heart attack or a stroke. There are no obvious symptoms of high blood pressure; the only way to know whether you have it is to see your doctor regularly and have your blood pressure checked. The National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association recommend a target blood pressure below 130/80 mmHg for people with diabetes. When your doctor says "130 over 80," here's what he or she means: The first number, 130, refers to systolic pressure, or the pressure or resistance inside the Continue reading >>

Is There A Diet For Diabetes, High Cholesterol And High Blood Pressure, As Well As Type 2 Diabetes, Gerd, And Coumadin?

Is There A Diet For Diabetes, High Cholesterol And High Blood Pressure, As Well As Type 2 Diabetes, Gerd, And Coumadin?

In our household we have members with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, reflux, and Coumadin use. Your Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan program sounded like a custom combination could be made to cover all of us. However, the diabetic, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure diets are not choices. The 4 of us range in age from 28-64 and need to lose 50 - 100 pounds. We are motivated to get started if only we could come up with a diet that would work for all of us. What would you suggest we do? Your website could be a lifesaver for all of us. Dr. Gourmet Says... We now know that the most effective diet for all three of the issues you mention is Mediterranean style diet. There is tremendous research to show that eating this way can effectively treat diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. All of the recipes on the Dr. Gourmet web site are based on Mediterranean diet principles and we translate those principles to familiar American recipes for you. You can read about this by using The Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan Coaching program, a collection of brief essays on how to eat healthy. You are correct that a lot of folks who have these sorts of problems also have other challenges like acid reflux or are taking Coumadin (warfarin). This is why we have tagged every recipe to let you know how a dish might affect other conditions. We have set up The Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan planner to create two week meal plans for all the members of your household. You can get started by registering here. We have lots of folks who write us to tell their stories of how they have lost weight and had improvements in their blood sugars and blood pressure. We'd love to hear from you as y'all work to get healthier. Write to us at [email protected] Thanks for writing, Timothy S. Harla Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

High cholesterol has long been known to raise the risk of heart and blood vessel disease in people with diabetes and without. Unfortunately, it’s very common among Americans generally, including those with diabetes. The good news is that there’s a lot you can do to lower your cholesterol and, consequently, lower your risk of heart disease. Making the effort to lower blood cholesterol is especially important for people with diabetes — Type 1 or Type 2 — who have a higher risk of heart disease than the general public. The bad guy: LDL Your LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol is the culprit when it comes to raising the risk of heart disease. LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein, and if you have too much of it in your blood, it can build up along the insides of your artery walls, leading to the formation of fatty deposits called plaque. Plaque makes it harder for blood to flow through your arteries, which means that less blood can get to vital organs, such as your heart and brain. Sometimes this can lead to a heart attack or a stroke. Plaque can also rupture, triggering the formation of blood clots, which can also block the arteries, leading to a heart attack or stroke. So it makes sense to keep your LDL level low. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most adults with diabetes who are not taking cholesterol-lowering statins have a fasting lipid profile done at diagnosis, first medical evaluation, and thenevery five years after, while those taking statins should have the test done when they start the medication and periodically thereafter. This test measures HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, as well as the level of triglycerides (a type of blood fat) in the blood. HDL cholesterol above 50 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, and triglycerides below 150 mg Continue reading >>

Top 10 Natural Foods To Control High Blood Pressure

Top 10 Natural Foods To Control High Blood Pressure

17th May is globally celebrated as World Hypertension Day. Its a day dedicated towards understanding this silent killer better. High BP is one of the biggest health risks that faces the global population today. Some would say it's almost an epidemic. High blood pressure can cause countless problems like diabetes, stroke, heart disease, kidney failure and even death! Hypertension is an unusual condition which has almost no symptoms. The only way to catch it is to get your blood pressure checked regularly. If studies are to be believed, only one-third of all people know they suffer from high blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured in 'millimetres of mercury' (mm Hg) and is written as two separate numbers. The first number or the systolic number measures the pressure inside the arteries when heart muscles contract. The second number measures the pressure in the arteries when the muscle is resting between heartbeats. How high should your blood pressure be? According to the American Heart Association, 120/80 is considered to be the normal limit. The range between 120/80 - 140/90 is referred to as 'pre-hypertension' and anything over 140/90 should be addressed. It's important to note that one reading does not indicate that you suffer from high blood pressure. The numbers need to be steady overtime. Possible Causes for High Blood Pressure While the exact cause of hypertension remains unknown, a few facts have been identified by health experts are: excess consumption of salt, lack of exercise, an unhealthy diet and genetic predisposition. Other factors that increase the odds are: cigarette smoking, binge drinking, obesity and stress. A recent study pointed out that processed or canned food and drinks might also be contributing to this increase. How to Control High Blood Pres Continue reading >>

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Best Foods for Diabetes, High Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure, and Weight All these conditions involve a genetic sensitivity to refined carbohydrates. In many people, refined carbohydrates leads to abnormally high and low blood sugar levels, a condition called dysglycemia. This information sheet helps you reduce this abnormal response. Did you know that what you eat is a critical determinant of how much you eat? Whether you want to lose weight, or want to maintain your present healthy weight, choosing the right kinds of foods will help you achieve your goals. Let's leave calorie counting to the mathematicians. If you are overweight, you know what happens when you ask your doctor for help. The usual response is "follow this diet and get more exercise.†That doesn't work all by itself, does it? That is because it is based on a partial truth - that the reason people gain weight is that they eat too much and exercise too little. Let's look at the facts. The fact my overweight patients have been telling me for years is "Doc, it's my metabolism." Let’s see how and why your food choices influence that metabolism, so that you can know what to eat, and what not to eat, to improve your health and lose weight. First, I suggest you watch our videotape on weight gain. You can borrow it from our receptionist. Here is part of the script for that videotape… �������� � ������ ������������������������������������������ “To help you understand what to do about this kind of metabolism, Continue reading >>

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Two out of three people with diabetes also have high blood pressure. Keeping your diet in check -- counting carbs, limiting sugar, eating less salt -- is key. You can still eat well and manage your conditions with these easy tips. Since you have high blood pressure, you should get no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. That's less than a teaspoon. So retrain taste buds. Instead of reaching for the saltshaker, flavor food with citrus zest, garlic, rosemary, ginger, jalapeno peppers, oregano, or cumin. Cooking at home also helps. “If you’re eating something from a bag or box or off a restaurant menu, chances are you’re getting too much sodium,” says Janet Bond Brill, PhD, RD, author of Blood Pressure Down. To get in the habit of having a balanced diet, “visualize your plate as a clock,” says Amber L. Taylor, MD, who directs The Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables. A quarter gets lean protein like baked fish, beans, or chicken. The last quarter holds grains, preferably whole, like brown rice. You’ll still need to count carbohydrates and make sure you're not getting too much sodium. Caffeine can raise your blood sugar and blood pressure. If you have higher blood sugar or blood pressure after drinking coffee, “limit your caffeine intake to 200 milligrams -- about 2 cups of coffee -- a day,” says Torey Jones Armul, RD, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Skip the French press or espresso and choose coffee made with a paper filter. The paper soaks up an oily compound in coffee beans called cafestol, which can hike up cholesterol. You can also consider switching to decaf. “Some research suggests it can reduce blood sugar,” Armul says. Continue reading >>

Recipes For Diabetes Management

Recipes For Diabetes Management

Eating a healthy, balanced diet can be a challenge. Avoiding excess saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, sodium and added sugars can be easy if you follow our tasty diabetes-friendly recipes. Snacks and Appetizers Honey-Ginger Fruit Dip Fresh ginger adds the "wow" factor to this dip. It is especially good with crisp apple or pear slices. Mushroom-Thyme Toasts Try these toasts when you want a tantalizing snack or appetizer or a sophisticated accompaniment to a soup or salad lunch. Fresh Tomatillo-Poblano Salsa with Tortilla Wedges This lively-tasting salsa will make you feel as if you're dining in an authentic Mexican restaurant! Garlicky Greek Yogurt Dip Whether you serve this quick mixture as a dip, spread, or condiment, you will love having it in your recipe repertoire. Breakfast and Fruits Applesauce Bran Muffins Bake a batch of these tasty muffins to enjoy throughout the week. They're great for breakfast on the go. Pineapple-Carrot Muffins These flavorful muffins are a great way to fit fruit and fiber into a portable breakfast treat. Baked Apple Frittata This custardy creation, brimming with apples and cinnamon, will fill your kitchen with a tantalizing aroma. Farmer's Market Omelets Brighten up your breakfast, lunch, or dinner menu with these flavorful omelets, full of fresh vegetables and fragrant basil. Spinach-Parmesan Quiche Bites Serve these savory bites for a nutritious snack or pair them with a fresh fruit cup of kiwifruit slices, cantaloupe cubes, strawberries, and red grapes for breakfast. Individual Three-Cheese and Vegetable Quiches These veggie-studded crustless quiches are easy to make and reheat well. They are equally good for breakfast on the run or a leisurely brunch. Strawberry Breakfast Mousse Crème No more skipping breakfast! This breakfast tr Continue reading >>

Eating For Diabetes And Heart Health

Eating For Diabetes And Heart Health

Managing one health condition through diet can be hard enough, but when you have diabetes there is an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), too. But this doesn’t mean two separate sets of advice in terms of changes to your diet. Victoria Taylor, Senior Dietitian at the British Heart Foundation, explains. What’s the connection between diabetes and CVD? If your blood glucose levels are high over time, you are more likely to develop atheroma, a fatty material that builds up on the lining of the arteries. This can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Diabetes can also increase the damage done by some of the risk factors for CVD, including smoking, high blood pressure and high blood cholesterol. The good news is that simple changes to your lifestyle, including diet, can help you to manage your diabetes as well as reduce your risk of CVD. What is a healthy, balanced diet? The basics of healthy eating are similar whether you have conditions like diabetes and heart disease or not. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to eating healthily but it is important to have a regular meal pattern and make healthy food choices, such as fruit and vegetables (at least five portions every day), wholegrains, oily fish, lean protein foods such as non-processed meat, poultry, pulses and nuts as well as lower fat milk and dairy products. Keep the fatty and sugary treats to small amounts and focus on the type of fats we use, as well as the amount of salt. Simple switches Making a couple of easy changes can help. 1. From saturated to unsaturated fat Having too much saturated fat can increase your blood cholesterol levels, so it’s important to reduce the amount you eat and instead get fats from unsaturated sources. Three tips to help get you started: Swap butter and ghee for unsatura Continue reading >>

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Take control of your health! Try these recipes from the eating plans mentioned in Heal Yourself With Food, and get on the road to a healthy recovery. Pritikin Diet to fight diabetes When combined with exercise, the Pritikin Diet can improve heart-disease risk factors; prevent and control Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and several cancers; promote weight loss. It's low in fat and sodium and rich in natural unrefined carbs, vitamins, minerals, beneficial phytochemicals, antioxidants and dietary fiber with adequate amounts of protein and essential fatty acids. Pritikin Diet Recipes: Also try Prevention's New 30-Day Diabetes Diet to help manage your condition. Portfolio Diet to lower high cholesterol Relying on four categories of foods known to help prevent heart disease--soy, nuts, plant sterols, and foods high in sticky fiber--and restricting meat, fish, and dairy (high cholesterol foods) the Portfolio Diet produces fast results and works about as well as statins in people with moderately high cholesterol. Portfolio Diet Recipes: DASH Diet to lower high blood pressure The DASH eating plan, which can prevent and control high blood pressure when used along with lifestyle changes such as exercise, calls for a certain number of daily servings of grains, vegetables, fruits, fat-free dairy, lean meats, and nuts. DASH Diet Recipes: [pagebreak] Recipes for diabetes from the Pritikin Eating Plan Ingredients: 2 ½ lb. portabello mushrooms, stems removed & washed 1 cup red peppers, de-seeded and diced ½ c yellow pepper, de-seeded and diced 3 tablespoons basil leaves, chiffonaide 3 tablespoons fresh thyme, picked & chopped 1 teaspoon oregano, dry ½ cup garlic, chopped ½ cup red onion, peeled and diced 1 teaspoon black peppercorns, ground 1 cup eggplant, peeled and diced ½ Continue reading >>

What Foods Are Best For High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Cholesterol And Kidney Function?

What Foods Are Best For High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Cholesterol And Kidney Function?

Anytime you incorporate more fruits and vegetables into your diet, you will be helping to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. Check out this recipe for a good example of what you could put in your Blast: Incorporating fruits and veggies will also help with your kidney function, it may not increase the function but it will help support an overall healthier body. The best thing to do at this time is to start with a one Blast per day. Fill your tall cup with half vegetables, 1/4 low glycemic index fruits like peaches, pears, apples, cherries, apricots, figs, grapefruits and berries. Use unsweetened almond milk, coconut water or regular water as your liquid base and add some superfood boosts like chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax seeds, ginger, turmeric, spirulina. Play around with that outline and find what works for you. You may want to decrease the amount of protein your are eating, for now aim to eat no meat 2-3 times per week. That will help to take some of the work load off your kidneys. Monitor your phosphorus levels with your doctor, if those start to rise we will modify your Blast plan. Ensure you are staying hydrated throughout the day and decrease processed foods from your diet, they are high in sodium and too much sodium can put additional stress on your kidneys. Don't be afraid to eat real food, just make sure each meal is balance and eat clean. Continue reading >>

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Many people think that diabetics have to avoid many foods, including different fruits. However, there are super healthy fruits for diabetics because they provide important minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals and fiber. Some low-carb fruits are also good for diabetics. People who have this disease should care about the ratings of the glycemic index to measure the carbohydrates which are converted to the blood Gl. Scientifically, the suitable glycemic index for diabetics is below 50. The following are the top 19 good fruits for diabetics and high blood pressure. Let’s check out these fruits to control your blood sugar and cure diabetes naturally. 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure Revealed! 1. Apples (Gl: 38, Gl/a fresh apple: 150g:7) Apples are very high in vitamin C, antioxidants and fiber. Apple pulp and peel contain pectin which helps to detoxify your body and remove harmful waste from the body. Pectin also is high in galacturonic acid that can help diabetics lower their insulin requirements up to 30%. You can eat a fresh apple or toss some slices of apples into a cup of tea and enjoy your breakfast. A medium apple contains about 12 g of carbohydrates and 54 calories. You can eat fresh apples without peeling them because apple peel includes a good source of anti-oxidants that good for digestion. Furthermore, apples are available throughout any seasons of the year. For containing a large amount of the soluble fiber, apples are fruit good for diabetics. Apples help diabetes patients reduce cholesterol, normalize their blood sugar level and improve their bowel function. Apple is also good at eliminating inflammation in the body and help diabetics beat infections effectively. Besides, apple is rich in anti-oxidants that help boost immunity. Apple also h Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cooking Tips

Diabetes Cooking Tips

Are your favorite foods full of salt and saturated with fat? Try these makeover-meal ideas for a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . You dont have to give up your Friday night pasta or completely swear off sweets to maintain a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. Your cooking style just needs a makeover. And you can tweak your favorite recipes so you dont feel like youre missing out on taste. As you get started, consider your goals are for overhauling your cooking to accommodate a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. Do you want to manage blood sugar? Lose weight? Boost nutrition? Or better yet, all of the above? If youre focused on blood-sugar control , it's best to think about controlling carbohydrate portions, says Susan Spratt, MD, an endocrinologist and an assistant professor of medicine at the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. But its also important to watch your fat intake and overall calories because of the role they play in obesity and heart disease. A study published in the March 2014 issue of the British Journal of Nutrition noted that a low-fat diet was beneficial for people with diabetes in reducing blood pressure, cholesterol, and fasting blood sugar levels. High blood sugar, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol all increase the risk for heart disease, Dr. Spratt says. Because controlling all three is important to reducing that risk, these recommendations are focused on more than just how to control blood sugar. says. Here's how to achieve all of these objectives: Fat isnt a bad word, but its important to limit the amount you eat and use to cook. Too much fat in the diet can increase body weight, and excess body weigh Continue reading >>

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