diabetestalk.net

Rash Around Ankles Diabetes

What Is Red Rash Around Lower Leg Above The Ankle?

What Is Red Rash Around Lower Leg Above The Ankle?

What is red rash around lower leg above the ankle? Recently returned from Disney World and develop a red blotch rash just above the ankle bone on the inside of my leg.The rash looks like specks of blood under the skin and in some areas form large red blotch.There is slight swelling in the lower ankle area.I did a lot of walking and the temperatures were in the upper 80's and lower 90's.Is it weather related, lack of fluid?I have never experienced this before.Have read the blogs, seems others suffer from the same or similar symtoms. Create an account to receive updates on: What is red rash around lower leg above the ankle? At last I am not alone - thought I was the only one to suffer from Disney Legs.Returned from Florida yesterday after 2 week holiday spent 4 days at disney parks and it happened straightaway - this happens every time I go to Florida (been going 10 years now) and I too was told its the extreme heat reflecting back off the ground!!. I am the only person in my family this happens to. Its so unsightly and uncomfortable and at times sore to the touch and looks like bleeding under the skin like burst capillaries.I saw a pharmsistwho advised hydrocortisone cream and keep legs up but no one seems to have proper diagnosis.Holiday carried on to the Keys, Fort Myers and Clearwater and whenever I walked anywhere it flared up again.I have also had it very mildly when skiing in France- don't know what to make of that!!I love my holidays to Florida and have now just accepted that this is what I have to put up with if I want to visit Mickey Mouse!! Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. Many people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In some cases, skin problems can be the first sign that a person has diabetes. In some cases, people with diabetes develop skin conditions that can affect anyone. Examples of these conditions include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. However, people with diabetes also are more prone to getting certain conditions. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Some common skin conditions in people with diabetes: Acanthosis nigricans This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of the skin. Often, areas of tan or brown skin, sometimes slightly raised, appear on the sides of the neck, the armpits, and groin. Occasionally, these darkened areas might appear on the hands, elbows, and knees. Acanthosis nigricans can affect otherwise healthy people, or it can be associated with certain medical conditions. It is frequently found in people with diabetes. Allergic reactions Allergic reactions to foods, bug bites, and medicines can cause rashes, depressions or bumps on the skin. If you think you might be having an allergic reaction to a medicine, contact your health care provider. Severe allergic reactions might require emergency treatment. It is especially important for people with diabetes to check for rashes or bumps in the areas where they inject their insulin. Atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis is the narrowing of blood vessels thickening of the vessel walls. While atherosclerosis most often is associated with blood vessels in or near the heart, it can affect blood vessels throughout the body, including those that su Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Everyone knows about the major long- and short-term complications of diabetes. But what many newly-diagnosed patients might not realize, is that skin conditions often come with having diabetes. My first exposure to skin conditions was a fungal infection. I can remember saying to the trainer that I could not have a fungal infection because my A1c was 6%. A specific over-the-counter anti-fungal ointment stopped the fungal infection process, and now I travel with this small tube just in case. I use it in the summer when I'm in the water and I develop itchy skin on my upper shoulder always in the same place. It's gone, and I'm happy. First, we want you to know that people who do not have diabetes get these skin conditions also, but as with many other complications, we tend to get them more often. About one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time. In fact, doctors report noting the presence of skin disorders before they diagnose diabetes. Second, if you think you have one of the skin conditions outlined in this article, please see your physician right away. Don't wait. Finally, we end this article with some easy ways to protect your skin when you have diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes). Skin Conditions that Can Affect People with Diabetes Bacterial Infections: People with diabetes appear to suffer more bacterial infections than the general population. There are several kinds of infections that can affect those of us with diabetes. One is a sty, which is an infection of the glands of the eyelids. A second type is a boil, which are infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. We all know bacterial i Continue reading >>

Ankle Rash | Healthgrades.com

Ankle Rash | Healthgrades.com

An ankle rash is an inflammatory reaction of the skin on the ankles. Rashes on the ankle can be caused by a wide variety of mild to serious diseases, disorders and conditions. Ankle rashes can affect a small to large area of one or both ankles at a time, and can occur in all age groups and populations. Ankle rashes are often part of larger areas of rash extending to the legs and feet. Ankle rashes vary greatly in appearance, extent and severity depending on the underlying cause. Ankle rashes may or may not be itchy and can be red, white, purple or silver in color. The texture of an ankle rash can be flat, raised, bumpy or scaly and include flaking off or peeling of skin cells. Ankle rashes can also appear as dots, spots or patches, or they may appear to be solid and continuous. An ankle rash can be a sign of a relatively minor condition, such as irritant contact dermatitis caused by exposure to poison ivy or poison oak. A rash on the ankles can also be caused by an allergic reaction to a variety of allergens (allergic contact dermatitis ), such as grass. Other causes of ankle rashes include viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and varicose veins . Ankle rashes, along with leg and foot rashes, are also a complication of poorly managed diabetes and peripheral artery disease, which can cause skin changes due to poor blood flow to the extremities. Ankle rashes can have several serious causes. A rash of purple spots on the ankles or other areas can be caused by a potentially serious condition, such as allergic purpura.Any rash that is associated with allergies combined with shortness of breath , wheezing , or swelling of the face, mouth or throat is a symptom of a serious, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis . Seek immediate medical care (ca Continue reading >>

Itchy Ankles

Itchy Ankles

Itchy Ankles (Pruritus) The itchiness in the ankles is medically referred to as “pruritus”. In a general sense, itching is the most common sign indicating that a person has a dermatological or skin disorder. It may also be a primary indication of an internal systemic disorder such as disorders of the blood, diabetes mellitus and worse, cancer. Our bodies’ itch receptors are exclusively found in the confines of the skin, cornea and mucous membranes. It may also be a primary indication of an internal systemic disorder such as disorders of the blood, diabetes mellitus and worse, cancer. Our bodies’ itch receptors are exclusively found in the confines of the skin, cornea and mucous membranes. Moreover, itchiness in the ankle is more often than not accompanied by a resulting rash or skin lesion due to the scratch-itch cycle that the person affected does. Meaning, if the person feels itchiness, he/she scratches the affected area to relieve it and the cycle goes on and on and on. However, itchiness is not always limited to rashes and skin lesions; there are actually instances that rashes and lesions do not present because of the pruritus’ rapid onset. This kind of pruritus is medically referred to as “essential pruritus”. It may be severe and can highly interfere with the activities of daily living. What causes itchy ankles? What are the possible predisposing and contributing factors leading to the occurrence of it? Itchy ankles may affect all age groups, may it be the infants, adults and the ones in their old age. And to put it broadly, the causes of itchy ankles may be categorized into 1.) Extrinsic factors and 2.) Underlying medical conditions. The extrinsic factors that may contribute to the development of itchiness in the ankles are as follows, but not limit Continue reading >>

Diabetic Skin Problems And Diabetes Rash [and How To Treat Them]

Diabetic Skin Problems And Diabetes Rash [and How To Treat Them]

Skin complications in diabetic patients are extremely common. They may even be the primary reason for the diagnosis determination. About 33% of diabetics will have skin changes caused or complicated by diabetes during their lives. Some of these changes may occur in people who are not affected by diabetes but are much more common in those with diabetes mellitus. Such conditions provoke itching, fungal and bacterial infections. There are other characteristic conditions of diabetes only. Typical skin changes for diabetes patients Diabetic dermatopathy The condition is also known as “shin spots”. Diabetic dermatopathy is the most common skin pathology in diabetes mellitus and is considered to be a pathologic sign of diabetes. It is presented with small round or oval brown spots on the skin, which are very similar to the age spots. Usually, they are found on the front surface of the legs, the affected areas are often asymmetrical. These spots do not cause itching or pain. Generally, they do not require therapy. They are due to changes in the small blood vessels of the skin – diabetic microangiopathy. It is a skin disease that is often, but not always, associated with diabetes mellitus. Due to the strong relationship between diabetes and this particular disease, many studies have focused on diabetic microangiopathy as the leading etiological factor. Clinically, necrobiosis lipoid is characterized by one or several soft yellowish-brown plaques that slowly develop in the anterior surface of the lower legs for several months. They can continue to exist for years. Some patients also have lesions on the chest, upper limbs and torso. The lesion begins as brown-red or body-colored papules that slowly develop into a “wax” plaque of varying size. The slightly raised border r Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

People with diabetes experience skin itching at higher rates than those without the condition. Ultimately, itching can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort and pain. A study of nearly 2,700 people with diabetes and 499 without diabetes found that itching was a common diabetes symptom. An estimated 11.3 percent of those with diabetes reported skin itching versus 2.9 percent of people without diabetes. A person with diabetes should not ignore itchy skin. Dry, irritated, or itchy skin is more likely to become infected, and someone with diabetes may not be able to fight off infections as well as someone who does not have diabetes. There are a variety of treatments available that can help to reduce diabetes-related skin itching so that a person can be more comfortable and avoid other skin complications. Causes of diabetes itching There are many reasons why a person with diabetes might experience itching more often than someone else. Sometimes itching can result from damaged nerve fibers located in the outer layers of skin. Often, the cause of diabetes-related itching is diabetic polyneuropathy or peripheral neuropathy. This condition occurs when high blood glucose levels damage nerve fibers, particularly those in the feet and hands. Before the nerve damage occurs, the body experiences high levels of cytokines. These are inflammatory substances that can lead to a person's skin itching. Sometimes, persistent itchiness may indicate that someone with diabetes is at risk of nerve damage, so the itchiness should never be ignored. Also, people with diabetes can experience associated disorders that include kidney or liver failure. These conditions may also cause itching. A person with diabetes can experience skin itching related to a new medication they are takin Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Protecting Your Outermost Layer The phrase “feeling comfortable in your own skin” is usually used figuratively to describe a level of self-confidence or self-acceptance. But when your skin itches, hurts, flakes, breaks out, changes color, or just doesn’t look or feel the way you’d like it to, the phrase can take on a new, very literal meaning. Diabetes can affect the skin in a number of ways that can make a person feel less than comfortable. In fact, as many as a third of people with diabetes will have a skin condition at some point in their lifetime. While some conditions may appear uniquely in people with diabetes, others are simply more common in people with diabetes. The good news is that a fair number of these conditions are treatable or can be prevented by maintaining blood glucose control and taking good daily care of your skin. Dry, itchy skin Dry skin can occur as a result of high blood glucose. When the blood glucose level is high, the body attempts to remove excess glucose from the blood by increasing urination. This loss of fluid from the body causes the skin to become dry. Dry skin can also be caused by neuropathy (damage to the nerves) by affecting the nerves that control the sweat glands. In these cases, neuropathy causes a decrease or absence of sweating that may lead to dry, cracked skin. Cold, dry air and bathing in hot water can aggravate dry skin. Dryness commonly leads to other skin problems such as itching (and often scratching), cracking, and peeling. Any small breaks in the skin leave it more exposed to injury and infection. It is therefore important to keep skin well moisturized. The best way to moisturize is to apply lotion or cream right after showering and patting the skin dry. This will seal in droplets of water that are present on t Continue reading >>

Skin Problems In Diabetes

Skin Problems In Diabetes

If you have diabetes, it’s important to be aware of potentially serious skin problems related to the disease and see your doctor before the problem gets out of control. In most cases, skin problems in diabetes can be managed with early diagnosis and treatment. you might like Scleroderma diabeticorum: While rare, this skin problem affects people with type 2 diabetes, causing a thickening of the skin on the back of the neck and upper back. The treatment is to bring your blood sugar level under control. Lotions and moisturizers may help soften skin. Vitiligo: Vitiligo, a skin problem more commonly associated with type 1 diabetes than type 2 diabetes, affects skin coloration. With vitiligo, the special cells that make pigment (the substance that controls skin color) are destroyed, resulting in patches of discolored skin. Vitiligo often affects the chest and abdomen, but may be found on the face around the mouth, nostrils, and eyes. Current treatment options for vitiligo include topical steroids and micropigmentation (tattooing). If you have vitiligo, you should use sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to prevent sunburn on the discolored skin. Acanthosis nigricans. This is a skin problem that results in the darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin especially in the skin folds. The skin becomes tan or brown and is sometimes slightly raised and described as velvety. Most often the condition, which typically looks like small warts, appears on the sides or back of the neck, the armpits, under the breast, and groin. Occasionally the top of the knuckles will have a particularly unusual appearance. Acanthosis nigricans usually strikes people who are very overweight. While there is no cure for acanthosis nigricans, losing weight may improve the skin condition. Acant Continue reading >>

Ankle Rash? Here's What You Should Know

Ankle Rash? Here's What You Should Know

Like other inflammatory skin diseases, a wide range of conditions can cause ankle rashes. Rashes can appear on one or both ankles, and may or may not continue up the leg or down onto the foot. Rashes appearing on the ankle may also originate from further up the leg. A rash on the ankle can be bumpy, scaly, raised or flat. Purple dots on legs can be part of the rash, as can blisters or sores in and around the region. A lower leg rash might appear spotted or include various patterns of coloration. An ankle rash can be bright red or a darker purple or brown color. The causes of an ankle rash vary greatly — from insect bites or contact with a poisonous plant to infections or even autoimmune disorders. There are minor, routine types of ankle rashes, and there are those that indicate a serious problem and require immediate medical attention. Ankle Rash Causes—Infectious Either localized or systemic, infections are one cause of ankle rashes. Infections are mostly communicable diseases that spread by human contact or direct contact with another organism that is carrying the infection. When exposed, the body’s natural reaction is to defend against infection with inflammation, heightened immune activity and even fever. Several types of infections exist that tend to present with a rash on the ankle or lower leg region. These include: Cellulites—a bacterial infection Shingles—a viral infection from the herpes zoster virus Folliculitis—infection of the hair follicles sometimes caused by hair removal activities Measles—an infection with the rubeola virus Tinea corporis—a fungal infection caused by ringworms transferred from cats and dogs or farm animals Strep or Staph—an infection from streptococcal or staphylococcal bacteria Roseola—a viral infection spread by re Continue reading >>

Why Are My Ankles Itchy?

Why Are My Ankles Itchy?

Itchiness, also called pruritus, can happen anywhere on your body. One of the most common areas of the body to experience an itch is your ankles. You’ll want to evaluate the particulars of your itchy ankles to figure out the cause, but you should see a doctor if your itch persists. Some itches are limited to the ankles, but you may also experience itchiness that covers more areas of the body. There are many potential causes of itchy ankles, and many conditions can affect one or both ankles. Contact dermatitis This condition is more commonly caused by a reaction to a skin irritant (irritant contact dermatitis), but one could have an allergic contact dermatitis. Different things can cause contact dermatitis, such as soap, cosmetics, fragrances, clothing, animals, jewelry, or poison ivy. While the main symptom is a red rash that develops where the skin came into contact with the substance, other symptoms include: blisters hives ulcers swelling Allergies Allergies can be caused by many different foreign substances and are one of the most common causes of itchiness. Some allergic reactions are localized, and they can cause symptoms in one place, such as the ankles. Some allergic reactions can cause a systemic reaction that affects the entire body. Hives Hives, also known as urticaria, are a skin rash that can be triggered by food, medication, and other irritants. If you break out in hives, the most common symptoms are itchy, red, raised, and swollen welts on the affected area. Because most hives are the result of a number of different agents, removal of that agent is key in treatment, but most hives go away on their own and are limited to the affected area. Fungal infections A common cause of itchy ankles is athlete’s foot, a type of ringworm fungal infection. Other fung Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Itchy Ankles: Causes, Rash, And Treatment

Itchy Ankles: Causes, Rash, And Treatment

The medical community refers to an itching feeling anywhere on the body as pruritus. Itchy ankles are often the sign of an underlying skin condition, though the feeling may signal other, more severe issues. Irritation may be made worse by excessive scratching. In these cases, treating the cause of the itch may resolve accompanying symptoms. Itchy ankles may cause rashes or lesions. Or, itchiness may be a result of these issues. When itchy ankles are not associated with rashes or lesions, the condition is called essential pruritus. These cases are often characterized by rapid onset of symptoms and interference with daily activities. It is important to discover the cause of itchy ankles. When in doubt, or when the itch lasts longer than a few days, a person should seek medical attention. They are often accompanied by a rash or other irritations. It is not always possible to prevent the itchy feeling. Most people can find relief, using topical anti-itch cream. Allergic reactions and skin conditions are common causes of itchy ankles. There are several underlying causes of itchy ankles. These range in severity from simple allergic reactions to much more serious concerns that require medical treatment. Some of the most common causes of itchy ankles are: The most common symptom of contact dermatitis is an itchy red rash. However, it may also appear with symptoms such as: Treatment for contact dermatitis typically involves identifying the cause and avoiding future contact. Over-the-counter creams alone may provide itch relief. Hives are a common type of rash, characterized by the appearance of raised, swollen welts. They are often the result of: Hives may be caused by an allergic reaction. It is often a good idea to seek medical attention, to ensure that this reaction is not c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rash

Diabetes Rash

There isn’t just one type of diabetes rash. Instead, diabetics can develop a number of different skin conditions, some of which look like rashes. It is estimated that about one third of all diabetics will have some type of skin condition as part of their condition. Most skin rashes in diabetes are the direct result of having out of control diabetes that can be managed by getting the diabetes under good control. This means checking the blood sugars regularly and following the doctor’s orders in treating the diabetes with medications. Here are some common skin conditions and rashes seen in diabetes: Bacterial skin infections. It is possible to get a bacterial skin infection even if you don’t have diabetes but your chances of having bacterial skin conditions is higher if you have diabetes. The usual bacterial infections seen in diabetics include nailbed infections, boils, carbuncles, and styes in the eyelids. It is also possible for these infections to go inward and cause infection of internal structures as well. If you have a bacterial skin infection, the common symptoms include having a red, swollen, painful, and hot area on the skin. Most of these rashes are minor and can be managed with antibiotic ointments, creams, or pills. Fungal skin infections. Fungi thrive in conditions of high blood sugar, which places diabetics at a higher risk of getting a rash from a fungal skin infection. Most of these infections are the result of a Candida albicans infection; however, other yeast and fungal organisms can be involved. The rash is usually itchy and red and may have blisters or scales around the major area of infection. Fungal skin infections are more common in places on the body that are moist and warm, such as between the toes, under skin folds, and in the arm pits. Th Continue reading >>

More in diabetes