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Ranch Dressing For Diabetics

Best Homemade (healthy) Ranch Dressing

Best Homemade (healthy) Ranch Dressing

This dressing is DIY at its very best, as it is better-than-bought in every way! No dressing is more loved, or more universally used, than Ranch-style dressing. From salads and wings to veggies and yep, even pizza, everything tastes better when drizzled with Ranch. And when it comes to Ranch dressing, for most of us, Hidden Valley® brand is what “ranch is supposed to taste like”. I am proud to say that this ranch dressing perfectly mimics its beloved flavor. I am even more delighted to share that it does so with SIGNIFICANT sodium, fat, cost, and calorie savings (with only 35 calories per 2 Tbsp. serving it delivers a 75% calorie savings!). Best of all, I think it tastes better than any commercial brand — whether bottled or made with pricey packets. Made in mere minutes, with ingredients always on hand, I honestly will never buy Ranch dressing again. And now you don’t have to either! MAKES 1 CUP 1/3 cup low-fat milk 1/3 cup light mayonnaise 1/3 cup plain low-fat or non-fat Greek yogurt (light sour cream can also be used) 1 teaspoon dried parsley 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1. In a medium bowl add all ingredients and whisk to combine. DARE TO COMPARE: Hidden Valley Ranch bottled dressing has 140 calories per 2-tablespoon serving, including14 grams of fat and 260 mg of sodium. Step into Subway and their Ranch dressing topping your “light” salad will cost you 220 calories and 400 mg of sodium. Nutrition Information Per Serving (2 tablespoons): Calories 35 | Carbohydrate 2g (Sugars 1g) | Total Fat 3g (Sat Fat 0g) | Protein 1g | Fiber 0g | Cholesterol 0mg | Sodium 140mg | Food Exchanges: ½ Fat | Carbohydrate Choices: 0 | Weight Watcher Plus Point Comparison: 1 SmartPoints: 1 Continue reading >>

Italian Dressing Recipe For Diabetics

Italian Dressing Recipe For Diabetics

Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard 1 clove garlic 1/2 teaspoon dried leaf basil Pinch dried leaf thyme Salt and pepper to taste Directions Mix all ingredients together in a small jar and shake well. Chill before serving. Yield: 1/2 cup. Serving size: 1 tablespoon. Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 17 calories, Carbohydrates: 0 g, Protein: 0 g, Fat: 2 g, Sodium: 43 mg Exchanges per serving: free. Recipe reprinted with permission from Light & Easy Diabetes Cuisine by Betty Marks, published by HP Books, a division of Price Stern Sloan, Inc., 360 North La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Best Damn Salad Dressing Recipe

Best Damn Salad Dressing Recipe

Making your own salad dressing is so simple! It’s not as easy as opening a store-bought bottle and pouring it on your salad… but it almost is. Why would you want to make your own? it’s nutritious and delicious! it’s made with heart, taste bud and diabetic friendly ingredients! You can make these salad dressings in batches … or make them fresh, with the meal you are preparing. This assumes you are cooking fatty meats … and you should be. :) Above is a picture of the salad dressing I made in less than a minute… isn’t it GORGEOUS! I don’t eat a lot of salads, but when I do I use the best damn diabetic salad dressing recipe on the planet…. the same one I am about to share with you! :) Why Homemade Salad Dressing? Almost all store-bought salad dressings use ingredients that I avoid, including sugar and vegetable or seed oils. I do not consume these oils: corn, vegetable, soybean, canola, peanut, sunflower, safflower, nor cottonseed. Why do I avoid these? In short, vegetable or seed oil use has been linked to or associated with: obesity, diabetes, fatty liver disease, cancer, etc. I have avoided vegetable oils since 2009 … and I thrive! For years I have only consumed animal fats and coconut oil. If you have “REAL” olive oil it’s ok to use in this recipe. I stopped cooking with Olive Oil years ago, but it’s ok to use in salads and in slaws like this, Low-Carb Paleo Slaw Recipe. Best Damn Salad Dressing Recipe I’ve been making this for years. What are the main ingredients in most salad dressings anyway? Oils (fats), vinegar and spices. Right? The overwhelming majority of the meals I cook involve fatty meats (and so should yours). After cooking the meat there is usually fat and bits of meat left in the skillet (or broiling pan, etc). One day I was Continue reading >>

Crunchy Vegetable Salad With Chipotle-ranch Dressing

Crunchy Vegetable Salad With Chipotle-ranch Dressing

Crunchy Vegetable Salad with Chipotle-Ranch Dressing 2 tablespoons low-fat, shredded Cheddar cheese 1 tablespoon chopped chipotle peppers in adobo sauce Tear or chop lettuce (should yield approximately 4 cups) and place in a large salad bowl. Add cucumber, green pepper, radishes, green onions, tomatoes, and cheese. Toss well. In a small bowl, mix together salad dressing, chipotle peppers, and lime juice. Pour dressing over salad and toss again to combine. Yield: 4 servings. Serving size: 1 1/2 cups. Calories: 71 calories, Carbohydrates: 7 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 2 mg, Sodium: 255 mg, Fiber: 2 g Exchanges per serving: 2 vegetable, 1/2 fat. Carbohydrate choices: 1/2. Kathleen Stanley is a Diabetes Educator at Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. She is coauthor of Quick & Easy Diabetic Recipes for One, published by the American Diabetes Association in 2007. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

1 / 11 Use Portion Control Enhancing your food's flavors through condiments and spices is key to enjoying a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. But before you reach for the ketchup and mayo, know that some choices are a lot better for you than others. You'll also benefit from learning how to read nutrition labels and measuring servings carefully. "Most important is portion control," says Constance Brown-Riggs, RD, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well With Diabetes. "Condiments should be used to enhance the flavor of food and not serve as the main course." Here are the facts on the most popular condiments and spices to help you choose. Continue reading >>

Super Bowl Snacks For Diabetics | Reader's Digest

Super Bowl Snacks For Diabetics | Reader's Digest

Courtesy Christy Brissette 80twentynutrition.com Prepare your end zone dance, because if you like sour cream and onion potato chips, you're going to love this Sour Cream and Onion Kale Chips recipe created by Brissette. This antioxidant and anti-inflammatory superstar is packed with vitamin A and vitamin C and according to research, kale is one of these top 15 foods for a diabetic. Courtesy 4505 meats "Jerky is a great option because it has no carbs and comes in many flavors. Be sure to read ingredients lists and pick ones that have no nitrates or MSG and with minimal ingredients," says Malkoff-Cohen. Don't forget to check the sodium and sugar grams too. (She recommends Krave brand.) For the crunch factor, try a protein rich and low carb option like 4505 Chicharrones pork rinds. They are all-natural, humanely raised, and taste a whole lot better than the nasty ones you might find in a vending machine. Eggplants rate low on the glycemic index chart and won't raise blood sugars as quickly as other foods that are carb-heavy.This dip by the Unleavened Fresh Kitchen , fits the bill."For dipping, avoid carby veggies like corn, peas, carrots, and beets. Try tomatoes, string beans, broccoli, mushrooms, peppers, and celery," advises Malkoff-Cohen. 2 eggplants, split and grilled to light char Extra virgin olive oil, lemon juice, kosher salt and fresh cracked, black pepper to taste. Directions: Scoop out the flesh of eggplant with a spoon and combine first five ingredients in food processor, then pulse to semi-smooth. Add remaining ingredients in small amounts until dip reaches desired consistency and flavor. Make your own healthy popcorn with this recipe from Chef Jason Roberts. "It's a tasty snack loaded with flavor and texture and easy to make," he says. Here's how to make pop Continue reading >>

Salad Dressings | Diabetic Connect

Salad Dressings | Diabetic Connect

As others have shared, home made are the best. I make one that is equal parts of Greek yogurt mixed with mayonnaise, add a little salt and pepper and some crumbled blue cheese. I add just a tablespoon of cream to loosen it up a little bit. YUM I also have one that is a hot dressing that is wonderful on spinach salads. You cook up about 3 slices of bacon, set aside. Then in that pan you saute about 2T of shallots until they are soft. Add 1/4 cup cider vinegar and 1t of honey mustard (or mustard with some stevia if you like). Then take one or two Roma tomatoes and cut them in half, remove the seeds and grate the tomato flesh into the pan with a box grater, discard the skin. I keep it in a jar in the fridge and the crumbled bacon separate. When I want it for a salad, I just pop a couple of table spoons of it into the microwave for 30 seconds and toss it into my salad, add a few bacon crumbles on top. Yum again. But if I buy dressings I stay away from anything that has "lite" in the title or the very sugary ones like french or Catalina. Even the vinaigrette, as Type1Lou points out, can be filled with carbs. The fewer carbs you put in your salad dressing, the more tomato, peppers or onion you can actually eat in your salad. It takes some time, but reading the labels will help and once you have learned the ones to steer clear of, it gets easier. Nothing beats homemade dressings but, for the bottled ones, look at the nutrition labels on the bottles and go with the lower carbs per servingone of my favorites is balsamic vinaigrette (4 grams carb per 2 tbsp)butwatch out for the raspberry balsamic vinaigrette or others with fruitthey usually have more carbs than the plain balsamic vinaigrette. Also, by checking labels you'll note that the regular versions of the same dressing has Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snack Recipe: Ranch Dip

Diabetic Snack Recipe: Ranch Dip

Most people I know like raw veggies–they are so easy to prepare and travel/store well. But I’ll tell you the very first question I get every time: But what about the Ranch Dip??? Can I eat that with type 2 diabetes? I don’t know about you, but in my neck of the woods, ranch dressing is where it’s at. It is a beloved salad dressing and dip, BUT a sky high source of calories, hydrogenated oils, MSG, artificial flavors and a number of other ingredients I can’t pronounce. Not to mention 140 calories in a 2 Tablespoon serving! Here’s the great news: what makes ranch “ranchy” is all the herbs and spices. The low quality oils are not necessary, they are just a vehicle for providing a smooth creamy texture. The artificial stuff is only there to preserve shelf life. What else is thick and creamy? Yogurt! Greek yogurt is strained to provide a thick, rich texture and in the process, much of the lactose-containing whey drips out. Therefore you end up with a protein-rich lower carb product. On it's own it has very little flavor other than ‘sour,’ but takes on the flavor of whatever is added to it. Adding the ranch spices, most of which you probably have sitting around in your cupboard already, will add the right flavor to the creamy texture. And what you end up with is a healthier Ranch Dip you can enjoy. Essential Kitchen Tools Happy Eating! Continue reading >>

Healthy Ranch Dip Mix Low Carb And Sugar Free

Healthy Ranch Dip Mix Low Carb And Sugar Free

Home Easy Button Low Carb Keto Recipes Healthy Ranch Dip Mix Low Carb and Sugar Free Healthy Ranch Dip Mix Low Carb and Sugar Free Posted by Susie T. Gibbs on May 19, 2014 in Easy Button Low Carb Keto Recipes , Gluten Free Recipes , Low Carb Keto Recipes , Spice Blends | Seasonings | 12 comments Who isnt looking for a healthy Ranch dressing mix? Join Fluffy Chix Cook and Susie T. Gibbs in bringing you a healthy Ranch dressing mixsugar free and diabetic friendlya low carb, keto delight. And psssstno MSG was harmed in the making of this recipe. Lets face it, whether or not we were raised on a ranch, or in Hidden Valley99.99% of the population hankers for Ranch Dressing or Ranch Dip and if youre keto or low carb high fat, the search is even more intense, because you want Ranch Dressing and Dip that is sugar free and often want it to be gluten free, too! Weve been informed by commercials thatRanch Dip is healthy, that it breeds healthy children, makes them grow-up to become wholesome, healthy, normal weight adults. But we beg to differwe have a whole family ofkiddos who were a little fluffy, that grew intofluffy adults, who ate a LOT of Ranch(dip and dressing), and whocould probably prove this one a mythand you dont have to look much further than the ingredients listed on the label. Ranch Dressing Mix Ingredients : maltodextrin , salt, monosodium glutamate (aka MSG) , dried onion, dried garlic, spices, modified food starch , less than 2% buttermilk powder and calcium stearate, and natural flavors (soy). Im not sure in which universe maltodextrin (sugar by any other name), MSG, modified food starch are touted as healthy. And then theres soy, mostly GMO , and quite troublesome to those with hormone positive cancers, thyroid problems, auto immune diseases and food sensitiviti Continue reading >>

Chopped Chicken Salad

Chopped Chicken Salad

This Recipe Serves 5 Ingredients Salad 1 avocado, cored and cut in half 8 cups romaine lettuce, chopped 2 green onions, chopped 2 carrots, shredded 2 cups cooked chicken breast, diced 2 hard boiled eggs, diced 1 large tomato, diced 4 tablespoons cooked bacon pieces Dressing ½ cup light ranch dressing 3 tablespoons salsa Instructions Gently remove the insides of the avocado from shell. Cut avocado into thin slices. In a large salad bowl, add salad ingredients, except salad dressing, and toss. In a small bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients. Divide salad evenly among 5 bowls. Top each with about 2 tablespoons salad dressing. Dietitian quick tips: You can either use leftover chicken breasts for this recipe or purchase a cooked rotisserie chicken from your local grocery store. You can also buy cooked bacon pieces. MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Confirm all ingredients are gluten-free and this recipe can be made gluten-free. Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

Are you bored with sugar-free candy, low carbohydrate pasta, and endless chicken dinners? Having diabetes does not mean that your diet should be boring. In fact, it should be the opposite. Variety keeps your palate interested and ensures that you get a healthy balance of vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants. The following 5 foods may or may not be a regular part of your diet, but each has a positive effect on diabetes management and prevention. Experiment with some of the “try this” options below for an easy way to incorporate these foods into your meals. Sunflower Seeds Sunflower seeds are a humble snack. They often sit on the shelf overlooked because of the hoards of positive press that almonds and walnuts get. Almonds and walnuts are very healthful nuts, but sunflower seeds are also full of important vitamins and minerals. Some of the nutrients in sunflower seeds that make them unique are copper, vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, and zinc. The presence and combination of so many of these nutrients can be hard to come by in common foods. Sunflower seeds have about 3 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein in an ounce of kernels. The best part is that sunflower seeds, while high in total fat (about 14 grams), contain mostly polyunsaturated fat, which researchers believe is the best type of fat to combat diabetes. Try this: Swap out your peanuts for sunflower seeds. Or hunt down a jar of sunflower seed butter instead of peanut butter for an easy way to get your fix. Salmon Salmon boasts numerous health benefits. It’s a great source of protein that is low in saturated fat and has important omega-3 fatty acid for excellent heart health. The combination of omega-3 and polyunsaturated fats in salmon keeps blood pressure down and protects the heart from disease. Research Continue reading >>

Just Found Out I Have Gestational Diabetes. - Circle Of Moms

Just Found Out I Have Gestational Diabetes. - Circle Of Moms

All Communities > Welcome to Circle of Moms!! > Just found out I have gestational diabetes. Just found out I have gestational diabetes. [deleted account] ( 4 moms have responded ) I just found out last week that I have gestational diabetes. In the middle of the day my blood glucose is fine; but in the morning and at night it is high. It seems like there is hardly anyhting I can eat. Any suggestions. I also had gestational diabetes. Has your OB referred you to a dietician? I saw a dietician within a few days of being diagnosed. She laid out a diet plan for me. However, my GD was so severe that I often found that foods allowed on the GD diet did not agree with my blood sugars, so I just avoided those. Also, even though I strictly adhered to the diet, I still had to be on medication. So, don't get frustrated if this happens to you. I had to eat small meals every 2 to 3 hours with only 2 to 3 servings (15 grams carbs/serving) of carbs each meal. I also found that my glucose levels were high in the morning due to cortisol levels. I ended up just eating protein for breakfast (ex. bacon and eggs). I then saved my allotted carbs for the rest of the day. I found that walking after eating really helped to keep my glucose levels down. Read labels for carb content. I had to adhere to 2 to 3 servings of carbs per a meal. And, 15 grams of carbs equals a serving. Don't pay attention to sugar amts because this is included in the carb amt. Some of the things that I ate for my meals were... Condiments very low in carbs or carb free are mayonnaise, sour creme, ranch dressing, ketchup, mustard, pickles, and cheese. So these were like free items to me. I found that I couldn't eat most grain/bread products, including oatmeal So I just mainly avoided these to avoid having to be on insulin. L Continue reading >>

Salad Dressing For Diabetics

Salad Dressing For Diabetics

If you have diabetes, choosing the right foods in the right amounts and eating them at the right time can become challenging and even overwhelming. Although salads are a healthy way to increase your vegetable intake, what you put on your salad can make the difference between a healthy meal and a high-calorie and fat-loaded meal. Salad dressings add a lot of flavor to salads, but it is important to know how to choose a healthy salad dressing to stay healthy with diabetes. Video of the Day To keep your blood sugar levels under control with diabetes, carbohydrate intake is your main concern. Mainly found in grains, sugar, starchy vegetables, fruits and some dairy, carbohydrates are broken down into sugar and cause your blood sugar levels to rise after being absorbed. Although salad dressings usually provide few carbohydrates, commercially prepared salad dressings, especially low-fat and low-calorie versions, may contain added sugar. Some "light" salad dressings can contain up to 5 g of carbohydrates per tablespoon, which can quickly add up, depending on the amount you use. When choosing a salad dressing, have a look at the carbohydrate content and avoid the ones containing added sugar. Type of Fat The type of fat used to make a salad dressing have a big influence on how it impacts your blood cholesterol levels and cardiovascular risk. Prioritize salad dressings made with monounsaturated fat-rich fats, because of their ability to lower LDL cholesterol levels. Olive oil, macadamia oil, avocado oil and canola oil are examples of oils rich in monounsaturated fats. Look at the label to know what type of fats are present in your salad dressing. The amount of salad dressing you drizzle on your salad is also an important factor to consider. Salad dressing are dense in calories and Continue reading >>

Homemade Salad Dressings

Homemade Salad Dressings

I make ranch & russian dressings. For ranch I use 1cup low fat or FF sour cream, 1cup FF milk & 1 pack of the ranch mix. For russian I use 1/2 cup Low fat or FF sour cream, 1/2 cup mayo, 1 cup FF milk & a little bit of ketchup to taste. The mayo can be Low or FF. I use Hellman's made with canola oil cause I'm allergic to soy. Hope this helps. Thinking of trying Onion dressing using the ranch recipe & adding toasted onion flakes. Welcome to the neighborhood! Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

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