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Raising Awareness Of Diabetes

Diabetes Awareness Month: 12 Ways To Get Involved Together

Diabetes Awareness Month: 12 Ways To Get Involved Together

November is Diabetes Awareness Month, a time to shine the spotlight on diabetes and diabetes research. Ready to get involved? Here are some noteworthy events happening across the country along with suggestions for creative ways you and your family can raise awareness about diabetes in your community. Observe JDRF’s T1Day What better way to kick off the month? The JDRF-sponsored T1Day, held each year on November 1, is an opportunity to get people everywhere more engaged in talking about type 1 diabetes. Suggested T1Day activities include visiting your child’s class for a kid-friendly diabetes Q&A, encouraging your child to write to the local paper about type 1 awareness, and sharing some of your story via social media. Even something as simple as a tweet describing how diabetes has affected your family’s life can be a rich conversation starter. Tag your message with #T1Day to connect with others in the diabetes community. Ryan Reed was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 17, just as his racing career was taking off. At diagnosis, he was told he’d never race again. Now, at age 22, Ryan is driving for Roush Fenway Racing in the No. 16 Lilly Diabetes/American Diabetes Association Ford Mustang in the NASCAR® Xfinity® Series. Stop by or tune in for races on November 7 (Texas Motor Speedway), November 14 (Phoenix International Speedway), and November 21 (Homestead-Miami Speedway). November 14 is World Diabetes Day, an annual observance marked all across the globe. The “Go Blue” campaign encourages supporters to do just that for the occasion: Dress your family in blue and go blue at home by putting a blue bulb in your porch light or lighting a blue candle. Let it shine! Diabetes Social Media Advocacy founder Cherise Shockley encourages you to wear blue on all fo Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Raise Awareness For Diabetes

7 Ways To Raise Awareness For Diabetes

The phrase diabetes awareness often crops up when we hear stories of diabetes being poorly represented or understood, and we regularly cite the need for awareness to be increased. Last month, fitness company Crossfit tweeted an ironic slogan for Coca-Cola open diabetes. Three weeks later, an Irish cinema apologised to a nine-year-old boy with type 1 after they prevented him from bringing in his own water to a film screening. These unfortunate situations arise due to a lack of diabetes awareness, and unless businesses and individuals are highlighted for their errors, more and more frustrating myths about diabetes will continue to be perpetuated. But what can we actually do to raise awareness? Here are seven great ways to contribute. Keep an eye out for petitions encouraging government changes that would benefit people with diabetes. When these gain momentum, they make news, and in turn boost awareness. Most recently, a petition has called for the symptoms of type 1 diabetes to be added to the NHS Red Book to highlight the dangers of undiagnosed type 1. In 2014, the JDRF launched the #CountMeIn petition to increase government funding for type 1 research, which was achieved. Diabetic children face more challenges than most kids, and one effort made to assist them is The InDependent Diabetes Trusts (IDDT) Parents Passport for Schools. The IDDT School Passport helps teachers who arent specifically trained to deal with diabetes understand the needs of diabetic children. It gives teachers all the facts they need to help children with type 1 diabetes, including information on meal times, insulin delivery, and hypo warning signs. Hypos are scary. Not just for the person having one, but for helpless onlookers unable to identify the symptoms or treat it properly. Too often, its s Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day Designed To Raise Awareness

World Diabetes Day Designed To Raise Awareness

HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Before her 12-year-old daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a year ago, Michelle Moriarty knew very little about the blood sugar disease other than that there was more than one type of diabetes and one kind of diabetes required shots. While her daughter was in the hospital recovering from a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis, Moriarty was given a crash course in managing type 1 diabetes, the type that can only be managed with insulin injections. Moriarty now knows more than she ever wanted to about living with diabetes. Nov. 14 is World Diabetes Day, sponsored by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). The hope is that by raising awareness and educating people about diabetes, people that have a chance to prevent type 2 and gestational diabetes (type 1 isn't currently preventable) will be able to do so. As many as 366 million people have diabetes worldwide, according to the IDF. That number is predicted to rise to 552 million by 2030. Most of those people have type 2 diabetes, and many don't even know they have the disease. In the United States, almost 26 million people have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy, according to Dr. Vivian Fonseca, president of medicine and science for the ADA. Type 1: Although the least common type of diabetes, affecting about 5 percent to 10 percent of those who have diabetes, type 1 patients are often the sickest when they're diagnosed, according to Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the clinical diabetes center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Type 1 is believed to occur when the body's immune system mi Continue reading >>

Raising Awareness On Diabetes In A Fun Way

Raising Awareness On Diabetes In A Fun Way

Raising awareness on diabetes in a fun way The event engages children to a number of activities. The Qatar Diabetes Association (QDA) organised an outreach programme at the Hyatt Plaza Shopping Mall aimed at raising public awareness on diabetes in a fun way. The initiative is part of a campaign by a group of young volunteers from The Power of Health with Diabetes Team.' The objective is to ensure that children will remember the message, Mohamed Khalid al-Saadi, special assistant for care programmes and regional chair for the Middle East and North Africa region at International Diabetes Federation, told Gulf Times. QDA, a member of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development, wants to effectively send key messages about the disease to residents of all ages, particularly to the young generation. Apart from free blood-test and medical consultation, the event also included puppet shows, stage performances, games, drawing and colouring, face painting, and sports competitions. Dozens of children also joined mascots in a walk-in-the-mall activity from 4pm. Al-Saadi, who supervises the volunteers, said the event at Hyatt is part of a series of celebration to mark the World Diabetes Day (WDD), a worldwide awareness campaign, set every November 14 of each year. Themed Eyes on Diabetes this year, several WDD activities will be held to promote the importance of screening, ensuring early diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes and treatment to reduce the risk of serious complications According to QDA, the campaign was introduced in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organisation in response to the alarming rise of diabetes around the world. Al-Saadi noted that a large percentage of Qatars population are diabetics, a reason for them to create more community awareness on dia Continue reading >>

Prevention Through Awareness Raising Global Awareness Of Diabetes And Its Complications

Prevention Through Awareness Raising Global Awareness Of Diabetes And Its Complications

Prevention through Awareness Raising Global Awareness of Diabetes and Its Complications European Endocrinology, 2006(2):24-8; DOI: Citation European Endocrinology, 2006(2):24-8; DOI: The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has recently concluded its World Diabetes Day campaign. This year-long awareness campaign, run by the IDF with the support of the World Health Organization (WHO), aims at informing the public of the causes, symptoms, complications and treatments associated with the condition. The year reaches its zenith on the World Diabetes Day itself, 14 November, when stakeholders from the global diabetes community join in what is both a celebration of the lives of people with diabetes and the worlds largest diabetes awareness-raising event. In 2005, there has been a focus on diabetes and foot care. The IDF has received significant help from its Consultative Section on the Diabetic Foot and the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot both of which are chaired by Karel Bakker. The aim of the campaign has been to convey and promote the message that it is possible to reduce amputation rates through prevention, aggressive management of existing diabetes and the provision of appropriate education for people with diabetes and healthcare professionals. World Diabetes Day serves as an important reminder of the increasing global incidence and prevalence of diabetes and the significant human, social and economic costs that this brings. It is crucial to alert the public worldwide to the fact that diabetes is a serious condition that is currently underestimated in terms of its frequency, cost and impact on quality of life. Each year, more than three million deaths worldwide are attributable to diabetes-related causes. The IDF estimates that approximately 194 mill Continue reading >>

Giving A Hand To Raise Awareness Of Diabetes | Johnson & Johnson

Giving A Hand To Raise Awareness Of Diabetes | Johnson & Johnson

Learn About the Company's Rich Heritage at Our Digital Museum This site is governed solely by applicable U.S. laws and governmental regulations. Please see our Privacy Policy . Use of this site constitutes your consent to application of such laws and regulations and to our Privacy Policy . Your use of the information on this site is subject to the terms of our Legal Notice . You should view the News section and the most recent SEC Filings in the Investor section in order to receive the most current information made available by Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc. Contact Us with any questions or search this site for more information. All contents Copyright Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc.1997-2018. All Rights Reserved. Giving a Hand to Raise Awareness of Diabetes Giving a Hand to Raise Awareness of Diabetes Just recently, a colleague of mine over at our LifeScan business gave me a heads up about a project shes been working one that they hope will help raise awareness about a disease that is all too often about statistics and too seldom about the hearts and minds of the thousands of people it touches. Back in 2008, LifeScans OneTouch brand team launched the Global Diabetes Handprint which enables people with diabetes to share what it means to them to live with this disease. Inspired by the Word in Your Hand Project found on TuDiabetes.com , the idea is for you to write the one word in the palm of your hand that best describes what diabetes means to you and share it on the Global Diabetes Handprint website. The Global Diabetes Handprint now has a home on Facebook. When you add your hand image to the site, it will be added to a community mosaic comprised of people representing every age, gender, and race from all around the globe. Yet beyond raising awareness of a disease th Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

The biggest month for diabetes awareness activities is only a few days away, and it’s the perfect time to raise your voice to increase awareness about diabetes! You might ask: Why? How does more awareness meaningfully impact the lives of people with diabetes? The question is a good one, but the answer is simple. Awareness is the first step to any kind of change. More funding for research, better public support for legislation issues. More understanding and empathy. Less blame and shame. Awareness + education is even more powerful. Knowing symptoms of type 1 can be life-saving when a diagnosis is right around the corner. If you’re at risk for type 2, education can help prevent or delay the progression of the disease (in cases where you’re able to do that). And education that helps our communities offer support (instead of blame) through a very challenging disease is invaluable. Here’s a list of different ways you and your family and friends can make an impact for diabetes in your community. 1. Make Social Noise with JDRF’s Thunderclap Campaign Once again JDRF kicks off National Diabetes Awareness Month on November 1st with type 1 diabetes awareness day, “T1D”, a day devoted to raising the voices of people touched by type 1 diabetes. Use the web platform “Thunderclap” to join in an auto-generated, mass-shared social media post All you have to do is sign-up on the JDRF #noT1D Thunderclap page. Show your friends, family, and the public you can live well with this disease and chase your dreams – whether that’s running marathons, travelling the world, falling in love, or advocating for a cause. The Instagram contest will ask you to show a photo of how you’re doing just that along with a few sentences on what it’s like to live with diabetes. Look for Continue reading >>

Connecting The Dots To Raise Diabetes Awareness

Connecting The Dots To Raise Diabetes Awareness

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. Connecting The Dots To Raise Diabetes Awareness 12/09/2017 10:08 pm ETUpdatedDec 10, 2017 Seven years ago, my son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. His diabetes management is complex. He checks his blood sugar between 5 and 8 times on a good day, and he needs a dose of insulin to regulate high blood sugar levels and anything he eats. Over the years, my husband and I have become intimately familiar with the volatility and uncertainty of diabetes. Given the premise that you become an expert after 10,000 hours of immersing yourself in a subject, then we are experts five times over. We continue to learn every day. That is why I watched coverage of National Diabetes Awareness Month with keen interest, wondering just how effective the medias attempts at awareness were. After watching several television reports, I came to a sobering conclusion: Diabetes awareness and education initiatives are severely flawed. Well-intended efforts are riddled with vagueness and misinformation that do not help the public make informed decisions. Since diabetes affects nearly 100 million people in the United States --with one in four not knowing they might be living with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)--the implications of this failure carry great weight. On November 10, The Morning Blend show, part of the FOX network, aired an interview with the actor Derek Theler , diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age three. Most of the conversation revolved around Mr. Thelers experience, and a call to action to stand up to diabetes so it wont hold you back. Although I appreciated the motivational angle of the interview, it lacked information to raise awareness. The interviewerafter mentioning the l Continue reading >>

Raising Awareness For Diabetes And A Kitchenaid Giveaway

Raising Awareness For Diabetes And A Kitchenaid Giveaway

All the best low carb keto recipes for a healthy lifestyle Raising Awareness for Diabetes and a KitchenAid Giveaway Raise your hand if you knew that today is World Diabetes Day. No? How about the fact that November is Diabetes Awareness Month? To be honest, if I didnt have diabetes myself, I might not know it either. And if I were REALLY honest, I might acknowledge that if I didnt have it myself, I might not care much about today or November or raising awareness. I dont like to admit it, but its true. And I daresay I am in good company. Diabetes is one of the most prevalent diseases in our society and its on the rise, so it should be on everyones radar. But in some ways, its the very commonness of the disease that makes us less aware. We all know someone living with diabetes, and oftentimes they seem to be doing just fine. Sure, they have to watch their diet, and maybe they have to take a little insulin or other medication, but other than that, its no big deal, right? Wrong. (You knew that was coming!). Many people are indeed managing their diabetes well, but the vast majority are probably not. Because in reality, watching your diet, getting enough exercise and taking insulin in the correct amounts at the correct times are NOT easy things to do. Lets face it, we live in a world of sweet temptations and unhealthy options, and were so busy with life that getting moving is often low on the priority list. If you are unused to healthy habits, it can be incredibly difficult to find a way to manage your blood glucose levels. Its difficult enough even when you are used to healthy eating and deeply committed to exercise, take it from me. And diabetes is a progressive disease, meaning that it gets progressively harder and harder to manage as our bodies age. So even those of us w Continue reading >>

Raising Awareness For Diabetes

Raising Awareness For Diabetes

Every year on November 14, we light up The Polyclinic Madison Center in honor of World Diabetes Day (WDD). The goal is to raise awareness for the growing health concerns posed by diabetes. This year the theme for World Diabetes Day is "Women and diabetes our right to a healthy future." Facts and Figures about Women and Diabetes 199 million women have diabetes, a number expected to rise to 313 million by 2040. Diabetes is a leading cause of death among women. 2 out of 5 women with diabetes are in reproductive age. 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes. Women with type 2 diabetes are almost 10 times more likely to have heart disease. Women with type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of miscarriage or having a baby with malformations. Access to essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information are key ways to manage diabetes outcomes. At The Polyclinic, our Diabetes Education and Nutrition department can help people learn how to stay healthy with diabetes for a lifetime. For World Diabetes Day, our certified diabetes educators hosted events at The Polyclinic Madison Center and Northgate Plaza locations to teach our employees and patients about diabetes, preventative care, and ways to eat and live healthier. Polyclinic employees take pictures with the World Diabetes Day blue circle to raise awareness for diabetes prevention and education. Learn more about healthy eating, exercise, medication, preventing complications, and how to stay motivated with our Diabetes Education and Nutrition team. Polyclinic diabetes educators also offer a full range of educational classes for prediabetes, type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Call 206-860-2208 for more information. Continue reading >>

Raising Awareness Of Diabetes

Raising Awareness Of Diabetes

JOHANNESBURG World Diabetes Day is on 14 November and its time to raise awareness. The world will be united on 14 November to campaign against and raise awareness surrounding the diabetes pandemic. Dr Larry Distiller, specialist physician and endocrinologist, and executive chairman of the Centre of Diabetes and Endocrinology, said this years campaign would aptly focus on Women and Diabetes and is aimed at promoting the importance of affordable and equitable access for all women at risk for, or living with, diabetes. Distiller added, While we advocate an awareness of diabetes for all people, this campaign specifically aims to highlight the essential diabetes treatments and technologies, self-management education and information that women require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes and strengthen their capacity to self-manage or prevent type 2 diabetes. Read: WATCH: CDE educates the public on World Diabetes Day According to facts presented by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF): Currently more than 199 million women live with diabetes worldwide. This total is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040 Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2,1 million deaths per year. Locally, diabetes is the biggest killer of South African women Two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for more than 60 million women worldwide Women with type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of early miscarriage or having a baby with malformations The IDF estimates that 20,9 million or 16,2 per cent of live births to women in 2015 had some form of hyperglycaemia in pregnancy Half of all cases of hyperglycaemia in pregnancy occur in women under the age of 30 The vast majority of cases of hyperglycaemia in pregnancy were in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness

Diabetes Awareness

Some people with diabetes may wish they could be less aware of their diabetes. However, in a busy world, diabetes awareness is key. If we want the medical establishment and national government to put their shoulders behind finding a cure, then we need to raise our voices, raise our profile and raise awareness of this annoying and often unpleasant condition. Insulin was discovered not quite 100 years ago, but since then there have been no major breakthroughs in the treatment of Type 1 diabetes , and the numbers diagnosed quietly grow. Meanwhile diagnoses of type 2 is the headline grabber with dramatics statements made that the NHS cant afford to treat people who are seen to actually just have a weight problem. If they have Type 2 diabetes , chances are that its more or less impossible to lose weight. The medications alone help you gain or at least maintain weight. So theres a lot of misunderstanding out there. Its only by raising awareness that we can help everyone else to understand what we live with. For some people diabetes awareness may be about the prevention of the onset of the condition. Healthy eating and more active lifestyles can ward off type 2 diabetes induced by being overweight. Learn to love food in a way that does not compromise your health, or your taste buds! For other people talking and sharing knowledge will bring them support and let them lose any sense of being different -- it's a tough call, but life with diabetes doesn't have to be all that bad. Let's share what we know. By talking about diabetes and the effect is has on our lives, we help keep healthcare admistrators and politicians focused on the job of providing us with the care and information we need to successfully live with our diagnosis. You can help raise money on this website if you go Continue reading >>

Raising Awareness Of Type 1 Diabetes

Raising Awareness Of Type 1 Diabetes

Each year, more than 15,000 children and 15,000 adults in the United States are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes . Often times, this diagnosis is not made until the person has been hospitalized with a condition such a diabetic ketoacidosis (in which toxic by-products of fat metabolism known as ketones build up in the blood). Thats why the charity Diabetes UK and the JDRF have launched a campaign to spread awareness of the symptoms of Type 1. Before World Diabetes Day on November 14, they hope to reach one million viewers with a video that describes the symptoms in straightforward terms and includes interviews with families whose children have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Karen Addington, Chief Executive of JDRF, notes that If a child is showing any of these symptoms, its vital that they get medical attention immediately: even waiting 24 hours can be dangerous. A simple finger prick blood glucose test can diagnose Type 1 diabetes instantly; early diagnosis can prevent a child from becoming very ill, and even save their life. This blog entry was written by Web Editor Diane Fennell. Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor. A simple blood test should be required each and every year, along with all the immunizations, visual and hearing tests required for school age children. Continue reading >>

Raising Awareness For Diabetes

Raising Awareness For Diabetes

Diabetes Ireland > Latest News > Raising Awareness For Diabetes James OReilly, Diabetes Ireland supporter, has joined a team of riders on agruelingcycling challenge from Brussels to Geneva. James is taking part in the MHealth Grand Tour which is a grueling 1,500km cycle that will take participants across three European countries. The aim of the tour is to raise awareness about diabetes, while providing an ideal opportunity to test and further develop mobile health solutions (mHealth) which aims at improving the day-to-day life for people living with diabetes. James, an avid member of the Marble City Cyclers, says I see my participation in the 2015 mHealth Grand Tour as a great opportunity for me to assist in the development of technical solutions that have the possibility to improve the quality of life of those living with chronic diseases worldwide. As a Type 1 Diabetic, I myself am hugely reliant on technology to manage my condition. Throughout the tour James will be using wearables and other technological advancements to monitor and manage his health. Over the 9 days Jamess progress will be monitored by medical professionals and data will be gathered and analysed with results being shared in late 2015. As well as raising awareness for diabetes, James is hoping to raise some much needed funds for Diabetes Ireland. Diabetes Ireland are the only Irish charity dedicated to supporting those in Ireland living with diabetes. If you would like to support James you can donate to . For updates on Jamess progress throughout the tour you can follow him on twitter . Jamess place on the tour was sponsored by ICON Plc . ICON is a global provider of outsourced development services to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device industries. Continue reading >>

Raising Awareness Of Diabetes

Raising Awareness Of Diabetes

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 03/18/2010 05:12 am ETUpdatedDec 06, 2017 "Between 60 and 70 percent of those age 65 and over are diabetic or prediabetic. Of these, half are unaware they have the condition because they are symptom free." This is the important message conveyed by Academy Award winner Olympia Dukakis and her husband, actor Louis Zorich . You can't spend time around Olympia and Louis without immediately sensing the strength of their 48-year marriage. Olympia begins a sentence; Louis finishes it. When Louis introduces an idea, Olympia seamlessly concludes it. The two speak as one. And the subject of diabetes screening brings out the passion in both of them. Louis describes his shock at being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes seven months ago during a routine exam. Like many others diagnosed with the condition, Louis had no symptoms. His mother and three sisters had been diagnosed with diabetes, and he had concluded that only the women in the family were affected. Fortunately, Louis found out he was wrong before the condition damaged his body. Louis was also surprised by the high incidence of diabetes in seniors. Once he began talking about his diagnosis with friends and colleagues, he confirmed the insidious presence of diabetes in an unexpected number of lives. Olympia and Louis educated themselves about the different kinds of diabetes. Gestational diabetes mellitus occurs during pregnancy. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and accounts for 5 to 10 percent of all cases. Individuals with type 1 diabetes must inject themselves with insulin, eat carefully and exercise regularly. Type 2 diabetes is the more common form and accounts for 90 to 95 percent of the cases. It occurs when the body's processing of in Continue reading >>

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