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Signs And Symptoms Of Childhood Cancer: A Guide For Early Recognition

Signs And Symptoms Of Childhood Cancer: A Guide For Early Recognition

Although cancer in children is rare, it is the second most common cause of childhood mortality in developed countries. It often presents with nonspecific symptoms similar to those of benign conditions, leading to delays in the diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Primary care physicians should have a raised index of suspicion and explore the possibility of cancer in children who have worrisome or persisting signs and symptoms. Red flag signs for leukemia or lymphoma include unexplained and protracted pallor, malaise, fever, anorexia, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, hemorrhagic diathesis, and hepatosplenomegaly. New onset or persistent morning headaches associated with vomiting, neurologic symptoms, or back pain should raise concern for tumors of the central nervous system. Palpable masses in the abdomen or soft tissues, and persistent bone pain that awakens the child are red flags for abdominal, soft tissue, and bone tumors. Leukokoria is a red flag for retinoblastoma. Endocrine symptoms such as growth arrest, diabetes insipidus, and precocious or delayed puberty may be signs of endocranial or germ cell tumors. Paraneoplastic manifestations such as opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome, rheumatic symptoms, or hypertension are rare and may be related to neuroblastoma, leukemia, or Wilms tumor, respectively. Increased suspicion is also warranted for conditions associated with a higher risk of childhood cancer, including immunodeficiency syndromes and previous malignancies, as well as with certain genetic conditions and familial cancer syndromes such as Down syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, hemihypertrophy, neurofibromatosis, and retinoblastoma. The annual incidence of cancer in children who live in developed countries is between 105 and 150 cases per 1 million children Continue reading >>

5 Signs Of Aging That Could Be Diabetes In Disguise

5 Signs Of Aging That Could Be Diabetes In Disguise

Research published this month in the Annals of Internal Medicine shows a significant spike in the rates of diabetes in the U.S. over the past two decades. In particular, the prevalence of prediabetes has risen from 5.8 percent between 1988 and 1994 to 12.4 percent between 2005 and 2010. Dr. Kathleen Figaro, an endocrinologist with Genesis Health System in Bettendorf, Iowa, told Healthline that a shrinking “cost per calorie” ratio in our food is partly to blame for the increase. “There is an excess amount of corn being produced, and it has to go somewhere. It is being used to make high-fructose corn syrup that is added to foods and decreases the price per calorie,” she said. As a result, we get dense, highly processed foods that are readily available, said Figaro. They can be bought cheaply in inner cities or other so-called “food deserts,” where access to quality, fresh foods is limited. Learn About the Type 2 Diabetes Diet » Get Tested by Age 45, Says ADA Tami Ross, a certified diabetes instructor in Lexington, Ky., who served as the president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators, told Healthline that age 40 is the “magic number,” when diabetes begins to sneak up on people. She said that everyone 40 and older should take the interactive type 2 diabetes screening test provided by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Find Out How to Face Diabetes Head On » Diabetes occurs when the body does not process sugar properly. Nonwhites, people who are overweight, and those with a family history of diabetes are at a higher risk. Almost 26 million people in the U.S., or 8.3 percent of the population, have diabetes, according to the ADA. Type 2 diabetes tends to affect people as they get older. About seven million people in the U.S. have type 2 di Continue reading >>

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