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Quitting Metformin

Metformin Withdrawal Symptoms?

Metformin Withdrawal Symptoms?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Within the last few weeks I have started to cut down on Metformin due to the successful control of my blood sugar levels, I was just cutting by missing a dose twice a week but this week I have cut from 500 mg twice a day to 500 mg just once in the morning after breakfast, I started this 7 days ago and at first I was OK. Yesterday and today has seen my health turn to the worst, I have been experiencing nausea and an upset stomach and all the side effects I had 14 months ago when I started taking this drug! But what is really worrying me is the psychological impact it has had on me with the onset of anxiety and depression. Could the 50% cut I have made resulted in this? Has anyone else had this experience? My blood sugar levels continue to be OK (at the moment). Please forgive me if I don't respond to all responses, I find the site difficult to navigate. Hi and thanks for your for the above. I am reinstating to the prescribed dose as I want to be well for Christmas. I have read on similar forums that others have had similar depression and anxiety when stopping Metformin, but it certainly isn't a common side effect. But what I do remember is that when I started taking this drug, apart from the initial gastric problems I very quickly started to feel a much happier person, it was was like the Met lifted me out of a trough and I have been a happy bunny until I cut my dose recently. When I googled "What are side effects of stopping metformin"? I got this result : Are you sure those are the symptoms for stopping? They look more like the symptoms for starting taking Metformin. I tried Google and a search result gave the results you posted. However if you look Continue reading >>

Why Isn’t Metformin Prescribed More?

Why Isn’t Metformin Prescribed More?

Since its debut in the United States in 1995, metformin has become the most popular oral drug for Type 2 diabetes in the country — and the rest of the world. Current guidelines by the American Diabetes Association state that unless there are special risks in a particular person, metformin should be the first drug prescribed to people with Type 2 diabetes. Yet perhaps due in part to its popularity, metformin isn’t free of controversy. As we’ve discussed previously here at Diabetes Flashpoints, there are concerns about prescribing metformin in people with kidney disease, and some doctors even question whether metformin deserves its status as the universally recommended first-line drug for Type 2 diabetes. In addition, there’s debate about whether metformin should be taken by more people with prediabetes. A recent study sought to explore the reasons why metformin isn’t prescribed as widely as clinical guidelines suggest it should be. Published last month in the journal Therapeutic Advances in Chronic Disease, the study notes that only roughly 65% of people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes are prescribed metformin — and that over time, this number drops to just 25% of people with the condition. As noted in a Pharmacy Times article on the study, researchers from the University of Colorado put together focus groups of relevant people — doctors, pharmacists, and other medical personnel — to ask about their perceptions regarding metformin. Based on these focus groups, the researchers found that three main factors affected how doctors prescribed metformin: concerns about when to start the drug, concerns about the drug’s known risks, and whether procedures were in place to notice and deal with any adverse reactions caused by the drug. Based on the focus grou Continue reading >>

Day 5 Off Metformin (sorry This Is So Long)

Day 5 Off Metformin (sorry This Is So Long)

Day 5 off Metformin (sorry this is so long) Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Day 5 off Metformin (sorry this is so long) Well.. after whining about false hypos and feeling so shaky, cold and weak, I realized it could be the Met. that was making me feel so bad. I tried adding more carbs (per my doctor) It didn't make any difference. On the 28th day I was so sick, I could barely walk across the room. My muscles ached as well. My husband went to steady me and grabbed my bicep. It was painful, to say the least. My legs didn't feel like they belonged to me.Constipated, hands shaking, sweating, freezing..Horrible.. This has been happening 24/7 since I started the met and went on low carb . I did both on the same day. I've lost a lot of weight. Now down to 118 from about 138. I was and still am, afraid this is something else besides diabetes, but my blood work looks fine, although the lab flagged the BUN (a little high), Creatinine (35 - should be 27) GFR (high at 109) and BUN/ Creatinine ratio. (32 - high is 26) ugh. So there is a problem with my kidneys clearing the met, IMHO. My doc said nothing. Liver and thyroid tests OK. Part of my problem may stem from taking Bactrim, which I was allergic to, but stuck it out for 9 days. That's when my kidney values seemed to go off. Then 15 days after the Bactrim, I was on the Met. My body has been going through a lot, so I went off the met. I am starting to feel better, although still shaky. Just not as weak. Finally have warm hands.Dry mouth a lot better now. Glucose levels are OK. Not as low as when on the met, of course. Fastings used to be 80-90. Now 100-110. PP numbers are acceptible Continue reading >>

Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) Often Undergo Protracted Treatment With Metformin And Are Disinclined To Stop: Indications For A Change In Licensing Arrangements?

Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) Often Undergo Protracted Treatment With Metformin And Are Disinclined To Stop: Indications For A Change In Licensing Arrangements?

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) often undergo protracted treatment with metformin and are disinclined to stop: indications for a change in licensing arrangements? University Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK To whom correspondence should be addressed: University Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Level 3 Q.E. Building, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK. Email: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: University Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK Search for other works by this author on: University Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK Search for other works by this author on: University Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK Search for other works by this author on: Human Reproduction, Volume 19, Issue 12, 1 December 2004, Pages 27182720, Sabine Muth, Jane Norman, Naveed Sattar, Richard Fleming; Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) often undergo protracted treatment with metformin and are disinclined to stop: indications for a change in licensing arrangements?, Human Reproduction, Volume 19, Issue 12, 1 December 2004, Pages 27182720, Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are increasingly being treated with metformin as an insulin sensitizing agent to reduce symptoms of hyperandrogenism and promote fertility. Indications such as hirsutism and cycle regulation require long term treatment. The drug is also being used through pregnancy. It is not licensed for any indication specific to PCOS, which means that much of this prescribing is taking place in an environment short of reliable information concerning safety. We describe the failure of rec Continue reading >>

Effects Of Withdrawal From Metformin On The Development Of Diabetes In The Diabetes Prevention Program

Effects Of Withdrawal From Metformin On The Development Of Diabetes In The Diabetes Prevention Program

Go to: Abstract OBJECTIVE— In the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), metformin significantly reduced the risk of diabetes in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. Diabetes status was assessed by oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) performed while participants were still taking metformin or placebo. To determine whether the observed benefit was a transient pharmacological effect or more sustained, we performed a repeat OGTT after a short “washout” period during which medications (metformin or placebo) were withheld. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— All participants assigned to medication who had not developed diabetes at the end of the DPP were asked to have a repeat OGTT after discontinuing the study medication for 1–2 weeks. The predesignated outcome was the odds of diabetes in metformin versus placebo comparisons during the trial and washout combined. RESULTS— There were 1,274 participants who participated in the washout study and 529 who did not because they had already developed diabetes. Before the washout, the odds of diabetes in the metformin group was lower than that in the placebo group (odds ratio 0.66, 95% CI 0.54–0.82, P < 0.001). After the washout, diabetes was somewhat more frequently diagnosed in the metformin participants (1.49, 0.93–2.38, P = 0.098). Combining diabetes conversions during the DPP and during the washout, diabetes was diagnosed significantly less frequently in the metformin than the placebo group (0.75, 0.62–0.92, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS— The primary analysis of the DPP demonstrated that metformin decreased the risk of diabetes by 31%. The washout study shows that 26% of this effect can be accounted for by a pharmacological effect of metformin that did not persist when the drug was stopped. After the washout the inc Continue reading >>

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

The most common medication worldwide for treating diabetes is metformin (Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet). It can help control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s available in tablet form or a clear liquid you take by mouth before meals. Metformin doesn’t treat the underlying cause of diabetes. It treats the symptoms of diabetes by lowering blood sugar. It also increases the use of glucose in peripheral muscles and the liver. Metformin also helps with other things in addition to improving blood sugar. These include: lowering lipids, resulting in a decrease in blood triglyceride levels decreasing “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increasing “good” cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) If you’re taking metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it may be possible to stop. Instead, you may be able to manage your condition by making certain lifestyle changes, like losing weight and getting more exercise. Read on to learn more about metformin and whether or not it’s possible to stop taking it. However, before you stop taking metformin consult your doctor to ensure this is the right step to take in managing your diabetes. Before you start taking metformin, your doctor will want to discuss your medical history. You won’t be able to take this medication if you have a history of any of the following: alcohol abuse liver disease kidney issues certain heart problems If you are currently taking metformin, you may have encountered some side effects. If you’ve just started treatment with this drug, it’s important to know some of the side effects you may encounter. Most common side effects The most common side effects are digestive issues and may include: diarrhea vomiting nausea heartburn abdominal cramps Continue reading >>

Metformin May Help With Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms

Metformin May Help With Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms

Metformin May Help With Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms The type 2 diabetes drug metformin could potentially be used for treating nicotine withdrawal for people trying to quit smoking, a new study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine indicates. The study, carried out in mice, explored whether metformin could ease nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Prior research has shown nicotine activates a particular chemical pathway (AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK ) in an area of the brain that controls memory and emotions. Cutting out nicotine stops the activation of this enzyme, and this is thought to contribute to the nicotine withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety , irritability and loss of concentration most smokers experience when trying to quit. As metformin has been shown to activate AMPK, the researchers wondered if this could compensate for the sudden withdrawal of nicotine. They found that when mice exposed to nicotine were injected with metformin before nicotine withdrawal, it reduced their anxiety, as measured by the amount they ate and the number of marbles they buried. Obviously, humans are not exactly like mice, and these early findings cant be applied to us. And as metformin is only licensed as a diabetes treatment, we dont know whether it would be safe or appropriate to use it for nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Also, this study provided no evidence that metformin would be any better than the many well-established treatments to help people quit smoking, such as nicotine replacement therapy . Cigarette smoking is the largest preventable cause of disease, but nicotine withdrawal symptoms are one reason why people have difficulty stopping and relapses are common. The researchers had previously found that long-term Continue reading >>

How One Man Stopped Metformin After Losing Weight

How One Man Stopped Metformin After Losing Weight

Exercise and weight loss lower blood sugar because they both reduce the body's insulin resistance, the key problem in people with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, increasing exercise or losing weight can sometimes lower or eliminate your need for diabetes medication. It's easier to keep your blood sugar in check without medication if your body is more sensitive to the insulin your body does make (most people with type 2 diabetes make at least some of the hormone). I was able to stop taking metformin, the drug I had been taking to lower my glucose—Louis Sarkes, Type 2 Diabetes Patient Louis Sarkes, 50, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2006 after a routine blood test during his annual physical exam. "I was surprised, but motivated to do something right away," said Sarkes, who is a money manager based in Baltimore, Md. He went to an all-day session on weight loss at Johns Hopkins University (where his doctor is based). He listened to doctors, nutritionists, and other patients talk about weight loss and exercise strategies, setbacks and successes. More about diabetes and exercise "I chose a diet low in sugars and high in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and kept carbohydrates at 30 to 35 grams per meal, or no more than 100 grams in a day," says Sarkes. He didnt count every calorie, but kept a general sense and tried to keep the daily limit of calories to 1,800. "To get as much information as I could, especially on tips for sticking with the diet, I met with the nutritionist on my own, and also read everything on the Internet I could find," he said. He followed the advice of his nutritionist and didn't feel guilty if he went over his carbohydrate or calorie limithe just started again as soon a possible. He found healthy snacks he liked and avoided high-fat, high calori Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

How To Wean Off Of Diabetes Medication

How To Wean Off Of Diabetes Medication

One of my greatest pleasures in life is to help patients achieve remission of their type 2 diabetes. This means their blood sugar levels have become normal in the absence of any diabetes medication. Many clinicians and patients are interested in learning my views about how to go about decreasing and discontinuing diabetes medications. The main role for medications is to help reduce or delay the risk of nasty complications of diabetes, particularly the damage to the retina, kidney, nerves, and circulation. The higher the average blood sugar level, as indicated by the hemoglobin A1c level, the greater the complication risk (which increases exponentially with increasing A1c). We know from clinical trials that using medication to keep the A1c at or below 7% can help reduce the risk of these complications. There is broad agreement that clinicians should recommend starting or increasing diabetes medications to patients who cannot get their A1c level to 7% or less via lifestyle change. Many patients come to me because the A1c is already over 7% and their primary care provider proposes increasing their diabetes medication, unless the patient can get to 7% or less with improved eating and/or exercise habits. Some of these patients are already on many pills, and insulin shots are the frequently the next appropriate treatment. Many patients would rather make the lifestyle changes than take more medication, so when the doctor frames the issue in this way, then a patient might become inspired to renew or increase the lifestyle efforts. The clinician might say “lets recheck the A1c in 3 months, and start the new medication if it is still above 7.0%”. My goal with patients is to use the lifestyle strategies I’ve discussed previously in this blog to drive the A1c as low as possib Continue reading >>

Stop The Metformin Madness

Stop The Metformin Madness

I have never been a fan of Metformin. It seemed too good to be true. Many years ago I had a conversation with a researcher about all of its possible therapeutic indications. His lab was actively pursuing the anti-cancer angle. That should have been a clue that Metformin might be causing more damage than we recognized, but it wasn’t. At that point, I was still enamored with the wonders of pharmacology and hadn’t yet begun my path toward understanding medication adverse reactions. Indeed, it wasn’t until very recently, when a family member began suffering from one of these reactions, that I began my investigation in full. This is what I learned. Type 2 Diabetes is Big Business The global profits from Type 2 diabetes medications rested at a paltry $23 billion dollars in 2011 but are expected to grow to over $45 billion annually by 2020. The market growth is bolstered in large part by the ever-expanding demand for therapeutics like Metformin or Glucophage. Metformin is the first line of treatment and standard of care for insulin resistance across all populations of Type 2 diabetics with over 49 million Americans on Metformin in 2011-2012. It is particularly popular in women’s health with an increasing reliance on Metformin for the metabolic dysfunction observed in women with PCOS, PCOS-related infertility and even gestational diabetes. Metformin is prescribed so frequently and considered so innocuous that it is sometimes euphemistically referred to as vitamin M. If we quickly scan the safety research for metformin, there is little immediate evidence suggesting any side effects whatsoever. In fact, in addition to controlling blood sugar by blocking the hepatic glucose dump, this drug is suggested to promote weight loss, increase ovulation in women, (thereby helping a Continue reading >>

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

Have you been prescribed metformin for PCOS and are wondering what the side affects are? Metformin is often described as a ‘safe’ drug, but read on to find out why this might not be the case. When I was diagnosed with PCOS, the first thing I asked my GP was what I could take to ‘fix’ it. She gently explained that there was no pill or surgery that could cure my condition. However, there was a drug that could help with the elevated insulin levels caused by it. Metformin, she claimed, was a safe drug with no major side effects that would help with insulin resistance and weight loss. Sign me up. At first, I thought metformin was the wonder drug. I lost about 5kg in 4 months, more than I had ever been able to lose previously. I was ecstatic. I had a quick look online to see whether there were any side effects and initially found that diarrhea, loose stools, fatigue, and muscle soreness were commonly experienced. But I thought that it was small price to pay for finally being able to lose some weight. However, when I investigated further I found that that there are some much more sinister side effects of metformin that aren’t so widely publicised. These include: – Depleting our bodies of essential nutrients. – Increasing the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by up to 9 times. – Reducing energy levels by almost 50%. – Killing beneficial gut bacteria. This article is not intended to be a case against metformin for PCOS. There is no doubt that metformin helps to reduce weight, lowers blood glucose levels, and promotes ovulation. My concern is the lack of studies about the safety of long-term use of metformin for PCOS, especially in utero. Drugs can help with the associated symptoms of a disease, but they cannot fix the root cause of it. Metformin i Continue reading >>

Quit Metformin And Finally Started To Lose Weight!

Quit Metformin And Finally Started To Lose Weight!

Quit Metformin and finally started to lose weight! I see that a lot of you have seen an endo doctor. Can you tell me what to expect and if there are any questions that I should ask when I see her on November 30th? Since having my uterus taken out (which was 3 times larger than it should have been)I am still experiencing a lack of interest in sex. Facial and leg hair growth have excellerated greatly. I was diagnosed with diabetes and it DOES NOT run in my family. My hormone levels are normal however my DHEA was 59. Both my gyno's refused to look at my numbers and dismiss my other symptoms with a solution of one it is your colon, and the other one's answer was bc for 2 months if still in pain let's take the ovaries. Which by the way looked good when I did the hysterectomy. My gp put me on met 500mg at night when my bg test came back as diabetes. Numbers were 148, and my vitamin D was down still so now take 50,000mg a week. So far the met does not seem to be helping with my weight. However it does seem as if my midsection is less swollen then it ever has been. So basically any help that anyone can offer is greatly appreciated. I started Metformin 6 years ago and it did take time for me to get used to it. I was nauseated a lot, and would actually get sick often times. If I "forgot" or was honestly lazy and didn't take a dose of my medicine, it would all come back to me. Once I was on the medicine and my body got used to it, it was better. I take it mainly for diabetes prevention, as I am prediabetic. It has helped me lose weight because it controls my sugar/carb cravings. It has taken time for me to get on the right dosage. I went from immediate release 500 mg a day to 2000 mg a day, and I also now take the ER/extended release version. The change to the current 2000 mg ER Continue reading >>

What Will Happen If I Stop Taking Metformin For Pcos?

What Will Happen If I Stop Taking Metformin For Pcos?

Metformin helps you manage the symptoms of the disease. There is no no doubt that it works. But it does not offer a cure. You can discontinue metformin on only one condition - you should exercise more and cut out all refined sugars and processed foods or just look around to what other diabetics do for insulin resistance. I cannot emphasize home-cooked food enough. Home cooked-food without those processed sauces and canned ingredients. Try it for a short time after you are on an exercise regimen for atleast a month.Keep checking your sugar from time to time. You will know that you need to get back on your metformin if the cravings and the bluesy moods come back. If the cravings don’t come back well and good, but if it does, you should get back on metformin. What I can assure you is that there is no harm in trying - PCOS is a lifelong thing - so nothing that you do can kill or cure you in a day or week. Whatever works will work over months. So give exercise and no sugar a try for two -three months. In the first month continue with the metformin with the exercise and in the next, reduce use by either reducing dosage or eating one every two days. And then if things look positive stop completely. Losing weight also helps reduce metformin dependence. While you are at it one basic advice I can give you is - don’t get into tiring exercise regimes (walking for an hour is also good), don’t get into diets unless your gynaecologist/endocrinologist has recommended one (even then don’t get into anything punishing because sustaining it will be stressful) and do everything it takes to keep a healthy mind - remove or modify habits from your life that induce stress - be it your job, family or friends. Identify them and pull the plug. Be nice to yourself. Please note that if you a Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Stopping Metformin

The Effects Of Stopping Metformin

The medication metformin is a drug in the biguanide family that is used to treat type 2 or adult-onset diabetes mellitus. Drugs.com notes that metformin is often the first prescribed medication for individuals with type 2 diabetes and may also be used in combination with other diabetes medications or insulin. This medication is sold under the brand name Glucophage, Glucophage XR and Fortamet. Metformin helps to reduce glycemic or sugar levels in the blood in a number of ways. If an individual with type 2 diabetes stops taking metformin, they may experience serious immediate and long-term effects of uncontrolled high levels of blood glucose. Video of the Day A primary mode of action of metformin is increasing the sensitivity of the body’s muscles, tissues and cells to insulin--a hormone that is essential for transporting glucose from the blood to the body. Drugs.com notes that individuals with type 2 diabetes have insulin resistance. This causes the cells to ignore the effects of insulin and not allow glucose to be transported into the muscles and tissues where it is vital to produce energy. The body tries to compensate by secreting more insulin, which only leads to hyperinsulinemia in the blood. If a patient stops taking metformin, the type 2 diabetes effects occur due to insulin resistance causing symptoms such as severe thirst, hunger and urinary frequency. The chronic levels of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also contribute to diseases of the heart and vascular-blood vessel-system. Gluconeogenesis is the production of glucose by the liver. A storage supply of glucose is reserved in the liver and released into the bloodstream when the body requires energy due to stress or hunger. The MayoClinic.com notes that another one of the mechanisms of metformin to reduce Continue reading >>

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