diabetestalk.net

Quinoa Carbohydrates Diabetes

Is Quinoa A Good Grain For Diabetics To Eat?

Is Quinoa A Good Grain For Diabetics To Eat?

If you have diabetes, you may constantly ask yourself: Is this OK for me to eat? While as a diabetic, you need to pay more attention to what you eat, you don't need to eat special foods. As a nutritious whole-grain, quinoa makes a healthy choice for anyone, especially someone with diabetes. As a low-glycemic carb that's rich in fiber and magnesium, quinoa is a good grain for people with diabetes. Quinoa and Carbs When you have diabetes, you need to be aware of the carbohydrate content in the food you eat. When your body digests foods with carbs, it turns it into sugar. You don't need to avoid carbs, but you do need to manage how much you eat at meals. Your doctor or a dietitian can help you determine your daily carb needs. As a grain, carbs are the primary source of calories in quinoa. A 1/2-cup serving of cooked quinoa has 110 calories, 20 grams of carbs, 4 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber. As a frame of reference, most people eat 30 to 60 grams of carbs at each meal. That means you might be able to fit in up to 1 1/2 cups of cooked quinoa at a meal. Glycemic Index While quinoa is a source of carbs, not all carbs act the same in your body. Some get digested quickly and cause a rapid rise in blood sugar, referred to as high-glycemic foods. Others digest more slowly and only cause a slight but even rise in blood sugar, referred to as low-glycemic foods. The glycemic index is a tool that ranks how carbs affect your blood sugar. Quinoa is considered a low-glycemic food. As a carb that only causes a slight rise in blood sugar, quinoa makes a good choice for people with diabetes. Fiber Content and Diabetes With 3 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup, quinoa is a good source of fiber, which also benefits people with diabetes. Eating more fiber-rich carbs improves blood sugar and l Continue reading >>

Is Quinoa A Good Grain For Diabetics To Eat?

Is Quinoa A Good Grain For Diabetics To Eat?

Quinoa can be a healthy part of a diabetic diet. It's a whole-grain food that's high in protein and lower in carbohydrates compared to other grains. Quinoa also contains vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that might help manage blood sugar levels and blood pressure, according to a study published in 2009 in the "Journal of Medicinal Food." Video of the Day Quinoa isn't technically a grain, it's a "pseudo-cereal" that's prepared and served as a grain and it has a similar nutritional profile according to the Whole Grains Council. The American Diabetes Association says that whole grains are acceptable for a diabetic diet and lists quinoa as one of the best choices. Quinoa can be prepared and served as a hot cereal, used cold in salads or served as a side dish. Continue reading >>

10 Best Foods For Diabetes And Blood Sugar

10 Best Foods For Diabetes And Blood Sugar

Some foods have a bigger impact on your blood sugar than others. Knowing which ones are the best for keeping blood sugar levels steady is especially important when you have diabetes, but it's a good idea for everyone. Your dietary goal is to choose foods that help keep your blood sugar level on an even keel. That typically means whole, minimally processed foods. Here are… Continue reading >>

Quinoa And Type 2 Diabetes: Is It A Yes Or No Food?

Quinoa And Type 2 Diabetes: Is It A Yes Or No Food?

We've recently had a number of similar questions, for example: “Is quinoa a no no for type 2 diabetes or is it okay? I know that technically it is a seed not a grain, so I was wondering where you stand with that.” It's true, quinoa is technically a seed but there is a lot more to this little seed than meets the eye. If you want to lower (or maintain) your blood sugar and A1C levels, we generally don't recommend you eat quinoa and here's why… What is Quinoa? Often claimed as a “superfood,” you see this stuff everywhere in magazines and health food stores. But what is it? Quinoa is often referred to as an “ancient grain” but the part of quinoa that we eat is actually the seed of the goosefoot plant. This plant is native to regions in South America. When cooked, the seeds become soft and are often used as a more nutritious alternative to white rice or wheat pasta. Quinoa is more nutritionally dense than a lot of grains, plus it is a gluten-free product, which has quickly made quinoa become such an “ideal food” for healthy eating. However, while quinoa is a fairly nutritious choice for a healthy person, for diabetics there is more to the story… Quinoa Nutrition Facts You can see from the nutrition label below that quinoa is high in protein and contains a decent amount of vitamins and minerals as well as 5 grams of fiber. Overall you'd think that stacks up pretty well. Yes, quinoa is considered healthier than some other grains, because it is a complex carbohydrate that contains more fiber than simple carbs like white pasta, white rice, and sugar. The fiber causes the sugar/ carbs contained in quinoa to enter the bloodstream more slowly. So technically, high-fiber whole grains are a better choice than simple, processed carbs like white rice. However, the m Continue reading >>

Why Quinoa Is The Perfect Food For Diabetics

Why Quinoa Is The Perfect Food For Diabetics

Why Quinoa Is the Perfect Food for Diabetics Brian is a current PhD graduate and MD candidate who enjoys writing about health, science, and the ways it can "hack" your life. Full Bio Quinoa has only recently begun to rise in popularity in the United States but it is already made a name for itself as a great source of nutrition. Compared to other grains, quinoa has more protein, antioxidants, minerals and fiber. Quinoa is also gluten free, making it the perfect food for people who are sensitive to gluten. On top of that, it has recently been shown as a good nutrition source for diabetics and can be used as a healthy way to maintain blood sugar levels.Quinoa has only recently begun to rise in popularity in the United States but it is already made a name for itself as a great source of nutrition. Compared to other grains, quinoa has more protein, antioxidants, minerals and fiber. Quinoa is also gluten free, making it the perfect food for people who are sensitive to gluten. On top of that, it has recently been shown as a good nutrition source for diabetics and can be used as a healthy way to maintain blood sugar levels. While it may be new to supermarkets in your area, quinoa has been a staple of the South American diet for centuries dating all the way back to the time of the Incas. It is native to the Andes Mountains and is able to survive harsh conditions. Quinoa is eaten like a grain with the Incas referring to it as the mother of all grains, but it isactually a seed. There are currently 120 different known variations of the seed, but the most popular are the white, red and black quinoa making these three varieties the types you will most likely see in your local grocery store. Research into the benefits of quinoa is relatively knew compared to research in other foods a Continue reading >>

Which Daily Carbohydrate Diet Is Better For A Type 2 Diabetic, Quinoa Or Brown Rice?

Which Daily Carbohydrate Diet Is Better For A Type 2 Diabetic, Quinoa Or Brown Rice?

Answered Apr 29, 2018 Author has 25.3k answers and 49.9m answer views Strictly speaking, they dont matter, just eat a little less quinoa (32 g/100 g instead of 28g/100 g carbs). Quinoa has more dietary fiber, a good thing. If youre overweight, eat a very low carb diet, personally I use no sugar, no staple foods like rice/bread/pasta/potatoes/fries/corn, not snacking, losing weight and exercising more cured me (went into remission) of my diabetes, fasting blood sugar now 5.2 mmol/L = 94 mg/dL. According to the DIRECT Study lead by Professor Lean about 50% of the obese study participants were cured of their diabetes (their diabetes put into remission) by following a strict 830 Cal/day diet for 6 month, losing a mean of 15% = 15 kg body weight and keeping that weight off afterward by radically changing their lifestyle. See Primary care-led weight management for remission of type 2 diabetes (DiRECT): an open-label, cluster-randomised trial The more weight one lost, the higher the chance for a remission 292 Views View Upvoters Answer requested by Quora User Answered Apr 29, 2018 Author has 847 answers and 188.5k answer views US-grown rice is higher in arsenic than Asian rice since rice fields in the South are heavily contaminated from prior use of arsenic in cotton cultivation. Brown since is actually higher in arsenic than white rice. Both rice and quinoa have fairly high glycemic indices and loads and should be eaten sparingly, if at all. If you must eat rice, buy Thai or Indian-grown. Its usually cheaper than US rice if bought from a supermarket that specializes in international foods. Im not diabetic but have a genetic predisposition with several family members whove been diagnosed with the disease. I eat grain-based foods, including rice and quinoa, just a few times pe Continue reading >>

Is Quinoa Good In Diabetes?

Is Quinoa Good In Diabetes?

Quinoa is a food grain which has been used for several centuries by South Americans, especially those who live in the mountainous Andean regions of Peru, Chile, Ecuador and Bolivia. This ‘mother grain’ as the Incans call it is now being cultivated and cooked in many regions of North America, Europe, Australia and other countries. Quinoa is highly nutritious and its nutritional quality is comparable to dried whole milk by the FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization). The protein quality in quinoa is higher than that of other cereals. For example, the lysine content is higher than wheat and essential amino acid content is similar to casein. Hence, quinoa is a great food choice for vegetarians. Quinoa is high in calcium, magnesium, potassium, manganese, zinc, copper, iron and phosphorous. It also has a low sodium and high soluble fiber content. A great advantage of quinoa is that it is a versatile grain and can be used in recipes for soups, casseroles, breakfast cereals, baked dishes, salads etc. Apart from quinoa grains, you get quinoa flour, quinoa flakes and quinoa pasta in health food stores. Diabetes Diabetes is a metabolic disorder. When we eat food, it breaks down to form glucose that is a fuel required by the body. In order for glucose to pass into the blood and be used by the body, it requires the hormone insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. In people with normal metabolism, sufficient quantities of insulin are produced and this helps in the process of moving glucose from the blood to the cells. Those who suffer from diabetes have too less or no insulin produced or the cells are damaged such that they do not utilize the insulin that is produced appropriately. The glucose which is unused gets built up and is excreted through urine out of the body. Thus Continue reading >>

Why Is Quinoa Good For Diabetes?

Why Is Quinoa Good For Diabetes?

Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) has recently become popular in the United States as a nutritional powerhouse. When compared to many other grains, quinoa has more: protein antioxidants minerals fiber It’s also gluten-free. This makes it a healthy alternative for people who are sensitive to glutens found in wheat. Evidence also suggests that eating more quinoa can help people with diabetes manage their blood sugar levels, and possibly prevent other conditions. In addition to eating it by itself, you can substitute quinoa in recipes that call for other grains. While it may be relatively new to supermarkets, quinoa has been a large part of the South American diet for many years. It dates back to the Incas, who called quinoa “the mother of all grains.” It grows in the Andes Mountains and is capable of surviving harsh conditions. While it’s eaten like a grain, quinoa is actually a seed. There are more than 120 varieties. The most popular and widely sold are white, red, and black quinoa. Only in the past three decades have researchers begun to discover its health benefits. Because of its high fiber and protein content, quinoa makes you feel full for longer. There is also reason to believe that it can help lower your risk for high blood pressure and high cholesterol, although more research is needed. Part of living with diabetes is managing your diet to help control your blood sugar. Foods that are high on the glycemic index are associated with raising your blood sugar. Healthy meal plans for people with diabetes often focus on choosing foods rated at medium to low on the glycemic index. Quinoa is on the low end, meaning it won’t cause a spike in blood sugar. Most grains don’t have all the amino acids needed to make a protein, but quinoa has enough to be considered a c Continue reading >>

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

1 / 9 Making the Best Carb Choices for Diabetes "When you say 'carbohydrate,' most people think of sugar," says Meredith Nguyen, RD, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at the Methodist Charlton Medical Center Diabetes Self-Management Program in Dallas. But that's only half the story. Carbohydrates are also starches and valuable fiber, which are found in many nutrient-rich foods that should be part of a diabetes diet. Sugar is the basic building block that, depending on how it's organized, creates either starches or fiber. You need about 135 grams of carbohydrates every day, spread fairly evenly throughout your meals. Instead of trying to avoid carbs completely, practice planning your diabetes diet with everything in moderation. "There's nothing you can't have," Nguyen says. "The catch is that you might not like the portion size or frequency." Use this list of healthy carbohydrates to help you stay balanced. Continue reading >>

6 Carbs To Add To Your Diet To Help You Stay Slim

6 Carbs To Add To Your Diet To Help You Stay Slim

6 Carbs to Add to Your Diet to Help You Stay Slim Swapping out refined "bad" carbohydrates for fiber-rich "good" carbs can boost your heart health, lower your risk of diabetes and help you lose weight. Here are 6 healthy, whole-grain carbs worth tryingplus tasty recipes and simple cooking tips. Pictured Recipe: Farro, Kale & Squash Salad Call it the Battle of the Carbs. On one side are good carbohydratesfound in fruits, vegetables, dairy and whole grainsthat your brain and body need. Then there are bad carbsthe ones in doughnuts, white bread, soda and other sugary, processed foods. Over time, filling up on bad carbs raises your risk of heart disease and diabetes, not to mention a bigger waistline. So here's a winning strategy. Replace refined carbohydrates with whole, unprocessed carbs, and you'll boost your heart health and lower your risk of diabetes. And because good carbs are typically rich in feel-full fiber, they can help you lose weight. A 2018 JAMA study shows that eating unrefined, high-quality foods, including good carbs, counts more toward weight loss than counting calories. Here are 6 healthy, whole-grain carbsplus tasty recipes and helpful cooking tipsworth adding to your meals. Consider it amped-up couscous. A 1/2-cup serving of this delicately flavored whole grain provides 2 grams of fiber, which can help you feel full longer. It also has 4 grams of protein, which can help tame your appetite. To cook: Bring 2 cups water or broth to a boil in a medium saucepan; add 1 cup quinoa. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook until the liquid has been absorbed, 15 to 20 minutes. Fluff with a fork. Note: Rinsing the grains first removes any residue of saponin, its naturally bitter protective coating. Try toasting quinoa before cooking to enhance its flavor. Black Continue reading >>

Quinoa Carbs | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Quinoa Carbs | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does anyone out there have any experience of carbs re Quinoa - it's not mentioned in my DAFNE booklet. I think that they are about 20% carbohydrate, but I'm not sure if I need to count them or if they are too long acting to worry about. Quinoa seems to be an increasing part of my diet these days. Does anyone out there have any experience of carbs re Quinoa - it's not mentioned in my DAFNE booklet. I think that they are about 20% carbohydrate, but I'm not sure if I need to count them or if they are too long acting to worry about. Quinoa seems to be an increasing part of my diet these days. There's 60.5 g per 100gms so it says on the packet in my cupboard Thanks for that - I'd thrown my packet away. So I need to count them, however when I did DAFNE they told me to ignore some foods with quite a high proportion of carbs such as Parsnip (about 20%) because it was so long acting as to make little difference. I wondered if it might be the same for Quinoa. Thanks for that - I'd thrown my packet away. So I need to count them, however when I did DAFNE they told me to ignore some foods with quite a high proportion of carbs such as Parsnip (about 20%) because it was so long acting as to make little difference. I wondered if it might be the same for Quinoa. I always count the carbs in everything I eat. It is surprising how those few carbs here and there soon add up. Trust me, it's not ! Quinoa needs a carb ratio as for any other grain type carb . This it one area where I emphatically disagree with DAFNE , that certain foods magically require no bolus because of a low GI factor . It very much depends on the quantity, for example someone may only eat one parsnip ro Continue reading >>

Can Chickpeas And Lentils Help Control Diabetes?

Can Chickpeas And Lentils Help Control Diabetes?

They’re a common part of traditional diets in India and Latin America, but in western repasts, legumes or pulses — that’s lentils, dried beans, and chick peas — have generally been a culinary afterthought. That may soon change, however, thanks to new research suggesting legumes alone can improve the health of diabetics. The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicines, was funded in part by an association of legume farmers and confirms that simply changing what they eat can help diabetics reduce some of their symptoms, as well as lower their risk of heart disease — in as little as a few months. MORE: Guide: The 31 Healthiest Foods of All Time (With Recipes) Starting in 2010, researchers in Toronto, Canada, enrolled 121 patients with Type II diabetes and tested their blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and more. Roughly half of the study participants were randomly selected to add a cup of legumes per day to their diet. The other half were told to try to eat more whole-wheat products. After three months, the patients were tested again on the same measures. Both the legume-eaters and the whole-wheat-eaters saw a reduction in their hemoglobin A1c values — a marker of average blood sugar, for a period of several weeks. But that reduction was slightly larger among the legume group than among the whole-what group: 0.5% compared to 0.3%. And while those changes may seem small, the study authors say that drops of this magnitude are “therapeutically meaningful,” and can lead to fewer diabetic symptoms as well as lower doses of medication to control blood sugar levels. The legume-eaters also achieved modest reductions in body weight relative to the wheat group, losing an average of 5.9 lbs compared to 4.4 lbs, as well as drops in total choles Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Quinoa: Nutrition, Health Benefits, And Dietary Tips

Quinoa: Nutrition, Health Benefits, And Dietary Tips

Quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) and other ancient grains, such as amaranth, barley, and farro are rapidly growing in popularity because of their wide array of health benefits. Ancient grains are referred to as such because they have remained largely unchanged for hundreds or even thousands of years. Quinoa was known to the Incas as "the mother of all grains" and was first cultivated over 5,000 years ago. There are hundreds of cultivated types of quinoa, but the most common versions available in stores are white, red, and black quinoa. This article will look at the nutritional content of quinoa, its health benefits, and how to add it to the diet. Quinoa is thought to help prevent a number of diseases. It is relatively high in antioxidants , compared with other grains and cereals. It can be prepared in as a little as 15 minutes. Quinoa has a naturally bitter coating called saponin that acts as an insecticide. Quinoa is often considered a whole grain as the whole grain seed is eaten without any parts being removed. Botanically, quinoa is not classified as a grain. It is a pseudo-cereal. This means it is a non-grassy plant used in much the same way as cereals and grains with a similar nutritional profile. The seeds of pseudo-cereals can be milled and ground into flour just as other grains and cereals. However, nutritionally, quinoa is considered a whole grain. Whole grains include the entire intact grain seed without removing any of its parts. In contrast, when grains are milled or refined like white bread, white rice, and white pasta, they have been processed to create a finer, lighter texture. This process removes most of the fiber and important nutrients. Whole grains, such as quinoa, provide essential vitamins , minerals, and fiber. These help regulate the digestive syste Continue reading >>

Quinoa & The Glycemic Index

Quinoa & The Glycemic Index

Sandi Busch received a Bachelor of Arts in psychology, then pursued training in nursing and nutrition. She taught families to plan and prepare special diets, worked as a therapeutic support specialist, and now writes about her favorite topics nutrition, food, families and parenting for hospitals and trade magazines. Quinoa comes in several colors, but ivory is commonly available in stores.Photo Credit: id-art/iStock/Getty Images When it comes to planning a diet, one big decision revolves around carbs. Its not just about choosing the number of carbs to eat. The key is targeting carbs that wont boost your blood sugar. Quinoa is one carb you can use to fill your daily quota. It's good for your health because its a whole grain, and its low glycemic index means it wont spike your blood sugar. The glycemic index, or GI, is a rating system that shows the impact of carbohydrate-containing foods on blood sugar compared to pure glucose. Glucose, which significantly spikes blood sugar, has a GI score of 100. Using a scale of zero to 100, GI scores are separated into three groups -- low, moderate, and high. Any food with a score of 55 or less falls in the low-glycemic range, 56 to 69 puts it in the moderate-glycemic category, and 70 or above represents a high-glycemic item. Quinoa has a glycemic index score of 53, based on a 150-gram serving, or a little less than 1 cup of cooked quinoa. This serving size contains 32 grams of total carbohydrates, including 1 gram of sugar. Most of these carbs come from complex carbohydrates, like starch. These digest slowly, enter your bloodstream gradually and don't cause harmful blood sugar spikes. One cup of quinoa contains 5 grams of fiber, which represents 20 percent of womens recommended intake of 25 grams daily and 13 percent of the 38 gram Continue reading >>

More in diabetes