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Questions To Ask Endocrinologist Diabetes

10 Questions To Ask An Endocrinologist (diabetes Specialist) As A Patient

10 Questions To Ask An Endocrinologist (diabetes Specialist) As A Patient

List of Questions to Ask an Endocrinologist (Diabetes Specialist) As a Patient List of Questions to Ask an Endocrinologist (Diabetes Specialist) As a Patient A thing about being medical patient is that youre quite impatient about your health. No thats not a paradox, a patient seeking services of a medical advisor is always impatient about whats going on with their body and thereby want to know more about it. Maybe its a reason why confront the doctor with a list of questions, dont we? But hey thats a good thing to do. Asking the doctor, a host of interrogative questions will help the doctor and yourself know better about your health and proper diagnosis shall follow upon. In fact, its strongly advised to speak off clearly with your doctor when it comes health issues. However, there have been times when weve been reluctant to ask questions to our doctor. And at other times, doctors have been reluctant to discuss the whole terminology at once. This might necessarily not be a good practice to preach upon. And when the case renders diabetes, theres every need that you ask your doctor things relating to your case. So here we are, with a list of questions to allow you impetus on your diabetic symptoms and case. This will help you out on your next visit to the doctor or the endocrinologist as we know by. Read along and get to know the List of Questions to Ask an Endocrinologist (Diabetes Specialist) as a patient. 1. How often should I check my blood sugar levels? The first and foremost thing to ask your endocrinologist is how often you should be checking your blood sugar levels . A patient on an insulin shot will require around 4 testing of blood sugar levels in a day whereas the one with no insulin shots will only be required to do so twice during a day. Your doctor will hel Continue reading >>

Endocrinology Frequently Asked Questions

Endocrinology Frequently Asked Questions

In this section are answers to questions about endocrine-related diseases. There are separate sections for diabetes, weight management, pituitary problems and bone problems. Questions about Diabetes Questions about Pituitary Problems Questions about Bones What is hemoglobin A1c? This is a type of blood test. A hemoglobin A1c percentage is important because it is the only way to know how well patients are controlling their diabetes over time. Based on blood tests taken over a period of two or three months, doctors can estimate patients' average blood sugar levels. The goal for most diabetics is an A1c of less than 7%. This is roughly equivalent to an average blood sugar level of about 150 mg/dl. An A1c of 9% indicates an average blood sugar level of about 210 mg/dl. Here's how blood sugar works in the body. Glucose (blood sugar) circulates in the blood after food is absorbed in the intestine. A small amount normally combines with the hemoglobin molecule (A1c). Hemoglobin is the red-colored protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the rest of the body. It operates in direct proportion to the amount of glucose in the blood. The glucose remains with the hemoglobin molecule until the individual's red blood cells die - usually between two and three months. When the patient's blood is analyzed for hemoglobin A1c, the resulting value number provides an estimate of the level of glucose over that time period. How do I properly treat a low blood sugar reaction? Should I eat a chocolate bar to bring my sugar back up? Chocolate is not usually the best choice because the fat in it slows down the absorption of the sugar. Treat a low blood sugar reaction with some type of fast-acting sugar, such as glucose tabs, four ounces of juice, four ounces of nonfat milk or a half can of Continue reading >>

Questions To Ask Your Doctor

Questions To Ask Your Doctor

Your first visit to a doctor who will treat your child's diabetes should have four parts: The doctor should take a medical history (ask questions about your child's life, complications, and previous diabetes treatment plan). The doctor should give your child a complete physical examination. The doctor should run tests on your child's blood and urine to find out your child's blood glucose (blood sugar) level, glycated hemoglobin level (a measure of average blood glucose levels over the past two to three months), cholesterol and fat levels, and urine protein level. Your child's age, complications, and symptoms dictate which other laboratory tests the doctor does. Your child's health care team should work with you to make a plan for managing your child's diabetes. This checklist will help you make sure your health care team is thorough at your child's first visit. measure your child's blood pressure look in your child's eyes, ask about any problems your child may have seeing, and refer you to an eye doctor for a dilated eye exam look in your child's mouth, and ask about your child's dental health feel your child's neck to check the thyroid gland, and do tests if necessary feel your child's abdomen to check the liver and other organs ask how and when your child was diagnosed with diabetes ask for results of laboratory tests you're child has had in the past ask about your child's eating habits and weight history ask about your child's current diabetes treatment plan ask how often and how hard your child exercises ask about times your child has had ketoacidosis as well as low blood glucose reactions ask what complications your child has had and what treatments your child has received for them ask what other medical problems your child has had Putting together a diabetes care Continue reading >>

Your Visit To The Endocrinologist: What To Expect

Your Visit To The Endocrinologist: What To Expect

After narrowing down your search for an endocrinologist, you have finally selected the one that you think will give you the best care for your diabetes. Diabetes is one of the most common conditions endocrinologists manage. You can work with your doctor to control this disease. You should write down any questions you have as preparation for your appointment. You should go to see an endocrinologist when you’re having problems controlling your diabetes. Your primary care physician may also recommend that you see a specialist for managing diabetes. Signs and symptoms that your diabetes isn’t well-controlled and may benefit from the expertise of an endocrinologist include: tingling in your hands and feet from nerve damage frequent episodes of low or high blood sugar levels weight changes vision problems kidney problems frequent hospital admissions because of diabetes A visit to the endocrinologist usually involves: a complete medical history a head-to-toe exam blood and urine tests an explanation of your management plan This is just a brief overview. Your appointment will start with a measurement of your height, weight, and vital signs, including blood pressure and pulse. They’ll probably check your blood sugar using a finger stick. Your doctor will want to check your teeth to ensure you don’t have mouth infections, and they will check the skin of your hands and feet to ensure that you aren’t developing sores or skin infections. They’ll listen to your heart and lungs with a stethoscope and feel your abdomen with their hands. Be prepared for questions about your current symptoms, family history, and eating habits. Your doctor will want to know how much you exercise you get and what your blood sugars typically run. It’s important to bring a record of your blood Continue reading >>

8 Questions To Ask Your Doctor About Diabetes

8 Questions To Ask Your Doctor About Diabetes

More than 85% of people who have type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Losing even a little of the extra weight can help improve insulin sensitivity. (In people who have prediabetesa state in which blood glucose is elevated but not high enough to be diabeteslosing just 5% to 10% of your body weight with diet and exercise helps reduce the risk of progressing to full-blown diabetes.) Ask your doctor for specific weight loss programs that have helped other diabetes patients. "People know intuitively what they need to do to lose weight," Maryniuk says. "But theyre often more successful if they have support from a program like Weight Watchers, or just having your doctor check in." 6 / 9 How often should I check my blood sugar? Checking your blood glucose (blood sugar) is an important way to gauge how well youre managing your diabetes. How often you check typically depends on whether youre taking insulin or oral diabetes medications, says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. "Even for people who take no medications, its always good to know whats going on in your body," she says. "Blood sugars are like light in a dark tunnel. Its information against your enemy. If you dont have information, you cant fight as well as you can. Are you going up? Are you doing well? It gives you a snapshot of how youre doing." 7 / 9 How will I know if my blood sugar level is low? Almost everyone with diabetes experiences low blood sugaror hypoglycemiaat one time or another. If your blood sugar gets too low, youre at risk of losing consciousness, which can be dangerous. The key is to recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia and treat them before your blood glucose level drops too low. People on the brink of hypoglycemia often feel shaky, dizzy, and weak. Ask your doctor ab Continue reading >>

Questions For Your Doctor

Questions For Your Doctor

Ensuring Good Care You’ve just been diagnosed with diabetes and you want to take proper care of yourself. After all, you know that if you control your blood glucose levels, you’ll feel better and lessen your chances of developing complications. But there are two problems. The first is that you don’t know enough about diabetes to ask the right questions. And the second? There’s a chance your doctor doesn’t know a lot about diabetes, either. On the other hand, it’s possible that your doctor didn’t explain much when you were diagnosed because he knew that all you would hear that day was the word “diabetes,” and wanted to give you some time to let the diagnosis sink in. Short of completing a fellowship in endocrinology, how can you tell if your doctor knows enough about diabetes to give you the proper care? It’s simple: Interview your current or potential doctor. Although taking care of your diabetes day-to-day will be primarily a do-it-yourself project, you’ll need the proper knowledge and tools before you can manage the condition, and that calls for a team of experts to guide you along the road to maintaining good health. Dr. Rhoda Cobin suggests beginning the interview with your doctor or prospective doctor with the open-ended question, “What’s going on in my body?” Cobin, who is a past president of the American College of Endocrinologists, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, and practices endocrinology in Ridgewood, New Jersey, says that that is the most important question you can ask. That one question, Cobin says, can open up a dialogue between you and the doctor. It’s a chance for the doctor to tell you about diabetes: how it begins, how it can affect the rest of your body, what needs to Continue reading >>

Ask An Endocrinologist: Understanding&managing Diabetes

Ask An Endocrinologist: Understanding&managing Diabetes

grkbfd: With Type 2 diabetes and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), how do these affect each other? Dr__Olansky: Polymyalgia rheumatica is usually treated with prednisone, but prednisone causes insulin resistance. This will raise the blood glucose in people with diabetes or prediabetes. mj22: What is the best treatment for ulcers on the leg resulting from Type 2 diabetes? Dr__Olansky: The best treatment for foot ulcers in patients with diabetes is to keep the ulcers clear, treat any infection with antibiotics and keep the pressure off the ulcer. This patient might need a special shoe if the ulcer is on the bottom of the foot. Crutches may be used and avoid bearing weight on that foot. In some patients, hyperbaric oxygen can help. sam500016: I have Type 2 diabetes and I have been on metformin (500 mg twice daily) for the past four years. It appears to agree with me and I am able to maintain my A1C level around six percent. However, my serum lactate is more than 2.4, which is very high. How should I deal with my high lactate level ? Dr__Olansky: I would not worry about an elevated lactate as long as your kidney function is normal and you feel well. We know metformin interferes with lactate conversion to glucose, so that is why yours is somewhat elevated. However, lactic acidosis makes you feel sick. thereg: What can you tell me about taking statins and high fasting glucose results? Before lowering my cholesterol with statins, my fasting glucose was normal. Now the doctor says I have pre-diabetes Dr__Olansky: In a large state trial called Jupiter, it was shown that there was more diabetes in patients that received the statin drug, but all the people who developed diabetes had either a fasting blood glucoses above the normal range or a HgbA1c that was in the diabetic range. Wha Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Top 10 Questions To Ask Your Doctor

Diabetes: Top 10 Questions To Ask Your Doctor

Medical Reviewer: Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology. Note: We recommend you use this page as a reference for your consultation with your doctor. Should I check my blood sugar levels at home with a glucose monitor? How often should I check them? What are my goals regarding blood sugar levels? What are the warning signs or symptoms that my blood sugars are too high? What do I do if my blood sugars are too high? What are the warning signs or symptoms that my blood sugars are too low? What do I do if my blood sugars are too low? How can I change my lifestyle and diet in a way that will be healthy? Continue reading >>

Nine Questions For Your Diabetes Care Team

Nine Questions For Your Diabetes Care Team

If you have diabetes, use the time you have with your healthcare team to your advantage. At every visit to your doctor, bring a list of questions to make sure you’re doing all that you can to take care of your diabetes. The following set of questions is designed to help you start a dialogue with your doctor about managing diabetes. 1. When was the last time my A1C was tested? A1C measures diabetes control over the past three months. Research has shown that tight control over glucose (sugar) means fewer diabetic complications, so having this test performed regularly is key to maintaining your health, whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. You should aim for an A1C reading of 7% or lower. Based on the outcome of this test, your healthcare provider should work with you to either reinforce best practices, or educate you about how to reach a better A1C level. 2. What were the results of my last lipid profile? This test determines your blood fat levels, meaning your cholesterol and triglycerides. There are two types of cholesterol: HDL (the good cholesterol that protects against heart disease) and LDL (the bad kind that can damage your heart). Your LDL levels should be lower than 100, and even under 70 for those at very high risk. Triglycerides, another fat, should be less than 150, but be sure to discuss your individual goals with your healthcare team. 3. How often should I be checking my blood glucose? How often you test depends on what kind of medication you take to control diabetes. If you’re not on insulin, your doctor may recommend testing just two times per day. However, if you’re on insulin, then your healthcare provider will likely recommend testing at least four times per day. Your healthcare provider should work with you to devise an individualized testi Continue reading >>

15 Questions For Your Doctor About Type 2 Diabetes

15 Questions For Your Doctor About Type 2 Diabetes

15 Questions for Your Doctor About Type 2 Diabetes Once youve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, open communication with a doctor you trust will be key to managing your health. Sign Up for Our Everyday Health: Diabetes Step-by-Step Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Now that you know what it means to have type 2 diabetes, you're ready to have a dialogue with your doctor about how you'll manage this disease together. Here are 15 questions to get the conversation started. Do you have special training in diabetes? If not, can you refer me to a specialist ? How many patients with type 2 diabetes do you see? What tests will you do at regular office visits? How often do I have to have the tests, and what will they tell you? Is there anything I need to do in advance of the tests? For example, do I need to fast if Im going to have a blood-sugar test? Can you refer me to a diabetes educator or a registered dietitian? I have a family history of heart attack and/or stroke . Will my diabetes put me at greater risk for those problems? How can I tell if my blood sugar is too high or too low? What should I do about either high or low blood sugar? Will I have to test my own blood sugar at home every day? Continue reading >>

Preparing For Your Endocrinologist Appointment

Preparing For Your Endocrinologist Appointment

We have all been there: the clammy hands, nervous stomach, constant anxiety, racing thoughts about eating choices we should or shouldn’t have made-all caused by the anticipation of seeing our endocrinologist. This is the appointment where we find out if we have been naughty or nice with our diabetes. The thought of hearing our A1c can be scary, especially since it is about to be made apparent just how diligent or lazy we have been over the last 90 days controlling our disease. There is no hiding from the reality of our A1c “score.” It will immediately declare if we have been eating right and keeping our disease in check or have been letting it get the best of us. But, regardless of the results, it is imperative that we find out on a regular basis just how well we are doing. So, with that thought in mind, below is a list of a few pre-doctors’ visit checks that we all need to start making with ourselves. 1. Keep track of your body-Think about times that you struggled with your diabetes and what parts of the day this happened. There is nothing more annoying than telling your doctor “I don’t know,” when he or she asks you a question. If there are certain times of the day that you struggled with blood glucose numbers, write it down to jog your memory. Try to think about the fact that the doctor is there to help and is not the diabetes police. Doctors can only help if you tell them what is going on. 2. Ask Questions-Your doctor’s appointment should always be interactive. Do not sit staring off if you have a question. Sometimes you might feel insecure about asking, but remember that’s what a doctor’s appointment is all about. Your doctor is there to help, but he or she can’t read your mind. You must verbalize what is going on. I suggest you write down a f Continue reading >>

Meeting A New Endocrinologist? Questions You May Want To Ask

Meeting A New Endocrinologist? Questions You May Want To Ask

Meeting A New Endocrinologist? Questions You May Want To Ask Prior to selecting an endocrinologist for help with diabetes management, its a good idea to have a face to face, question-and-answer meeting with him or her. Most physicians will meet with prospective patients to answer their questions, but the appointment will likely be limited to about 15 minutes. So, if the meeting is to be productive, its essential for patients to prepare a list of well thought-out questions. Here are some suggested questions to ask an endocrinologist, or doctor at an initial meeting. Its best to write selected questions down with enough space between them to record the physicians responses. Doctor and Staff. Its helpful to know the physicians experience with type1, or type 2 diabetes, and whether a certified diabetes educator, or diabetes-savvy dietician is available for consultation. Its also important to learn who in the doctors office deals with prior authorizationsshould there be a problem with acquiring supplies. Availability. Patients should know how long routine office visits are, what the doctor recommends patients do when they become sick, and who to call in the middle of the night. Insulin users need to find out who handles insulin adjustment inquiries, and when that person is available. Tests. Inquire how often patients are expected to test blood sugar levels, and how often an A1C test is required. Where the A1C testing is done, and the doctor's preferred A1C target score are also good to know. Type 1, and some type 2 patients might want the physician's guidelines for ketone testing. Protocols. Learn the doctors protocols for treating hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), for treating glucose levels at or above 300 mg/dL, and when the physician recommends glucagon. Pumps and Monitor Continue reading >>

Diabetes Interview: 30 Questions

Diabetes Interview: 30 Questions

Sometimes, working on my own can feel slightly schizophrenic. I know you have tons of questions for me. And today you’ll get some of them answered! I’ve done an interview with none other than my fabulous self. I asked myself, included the ones from you (and googled some) questions to answer. So here we go, here is the GrainBrain.ch interview with Hanna Boëthius: Beginning GrainBrain: What type of diabetes do you have? Hanna Boëthius: I have Type 1 Diabetes. GB: How long have you had diabetes? HB: I was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 2, 29 years ago now. GB: How did you manage, growing up? Did you hide your diabetes? HB: I had my moments. Up until the age of about 10, my parents had full control of the diabetes and me. That’s also when I learned how to do my own injections, which gave me a little more freedom. I can’t say I ever took pride in having diabetes before. Being a teenager with T1D was difficult for me, I wanted nothing else than to be like “everybody else”, and I felt the diabetes hindered me in that. Starting at about age 16 I started hiding the diabetes more and more, at times even ignoring it. It was a stupid move on my part, as it brought me to the ICU on the night of my high school graduation with a life-threatening DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis), but luckily I survived, thanks to the excellent health care staff around me. This complete roller coaster of taking care of myself vs not doing it continued a few years after that too, purely because I didn’t achieve the results I was promised and that I was working towards. GB: Was it tough on your sibling, with you being the center of attention? HB: Oh yes, most definitely. What she actually feels about it, you’ll have to ask her, but I think she has found it very tough. GB: What was hard Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - What To Ask Your Doctor

Type 2 Diabetes - What To Ask Your Doctor

Ask your provider to check the nerves, skin, and pulses in your feet. Also ask these questions: How often should I check my feet? What should I do when I check them? What problems should I call my provider about? Who should trim my toenails? Is it OK if I trim them? How should I take care of my feet every day? What type of shoes and socks should I wear? Should I see a foot doctor (podiatrist)? Ask your provider about getting exercise: Before I start, do I need to have my heart checked? My eyes? My feet? What type of exercise program should I do? What type of activities should I avoid? When should I check my blood sugar when I exercise? What should I bring with me when I exercise? Should I eat before or during exercise? Do I need to adjust my medicines when I exercise? When should I next have an eye doctor check my eyes? What eye problems should I call my doctor about? Ask your provider about meeting with a dietitian. Questions for the dietitian may include: What foods increase my blood sugar the most? What foods can help me with my weight loss goals? Ask your provider about your diabetes medicines: When should I take them? What should I do if I miss a dose? Are there any side effects? How often should I check my blood sugar level at home? Should I do it at different times of the day? What is too low? What is too high? What should I do if my blood sugar is too low or too high? Should I get a medical alert bracelet or necklace? Should I have glucagon at home? Ask your provider about symptoms that you are having if they have not been discussed. Tell your provider about blurred vision, skin changes, depression, reactions at injection sites, sexual dysfunction, tooth pain, muscle pain, or nausea. Ask your provider about other tests you may need, such as cholesterol, A1C, and Continue reading >>

20 Questions To Ask A New Endocrinologist

20 Questions To Ask A New Endocrinologist

Here are some questions you might want to ask a doctor during this initial visit: 1. What is your experience with Type 1 diabetes? 2. What do you expect my A1C score to be? 5. Do you do the A1C test in your office? 6. How many times a day do you expect me to test my blood sugar? 7. What is your protocol on treating a bout of hypoglycemia? 8. What is your protocol on treating blood sugar levels that are 300 mg/dL or higher? 9. When do you have your patients test for ketones? 11. Do you have a certified diabetes educator who is experienced in working with people with Type 1 diabetes? 12. Do you have a dietician who is experienced in working with people with Type 1 diabetes? 13. Who takes insulin adjustment calls, and what are their hours? 14. Who do I call in the middle of the night? 16. Are you familiar with all the insulin pumps on the market? 18. Do you download pumps and meters at every visit? 19. Do you have many patients on continuous glucose monitors? 20. Who in your office works with prior authorizations in case I have an issue with supplies? Your options for doctors may be limited by geography. If you are in a rural area, there may only be one endocrinologist in the area, or there may be none. If thats the case, you will have to make the best of the situation and develop a good relationship with that physician. However, if you do have a choice, this set of questions will help you find the best medical provider possible for your needs. If you would like to buy The Savvy Diabetic A Survival Guide, you can do so at thesavvydiabetic.com/buythebook . This excerpt has been edited for length and clarity. Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here . Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation , our sister p Continue reading >>

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