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Questions And Answers About Diabetes

Facts On Diabetes Quiz

Facts On Diabetes Quiz

Class is in session! Quizzes are fun to take and help you learn what facts you know and what you might want to read up on! We hope you enjoy taking this 10 question diabetes fact quiz based on five of our most popular blogs. The answers are found at the bottom of the page. We are giving you a link to the blog that each question comes from so you can review the topics. For those of you who like to keep track, each question is worth 10 points so this fun diabetes quiz is worth a total of 100 points. Good luck and enjoy! If you let us know, we are happy to write another quiz in the future. According to the Mayo Clinic, how much caffeine is in 8 ounces (240mL) of generic brewed coffee? Which facts are true about coffee and caffeine? A. As little as 200 mg of caffeine may enhance a special type of memory called pattern separation B. Increased caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption is associated with a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes C. A small study on people with type 1 diabetes found that with unplanned exercise and when a person cannot reduce their insulin dose, caffeine may help reduce extra calories needed to treat hypoglycemia. A large scale study is needed to research this. Questions 3 and 4 are from: Diabetes and Five Related Foot Problems . Question 3: Peripheral neuropathy is very common in people with diabetes. As many as 70 percent of people with diabetes suffer from this condition. What is the definition of peripheral neuropathy? A. Nerve damage affecting vision and hearing B. Nerve damage to the parts of the body that is away from the center. This includes feet and hands. D. Sharp pain in the body below the heart. This includes the abdomen and digestive tract. Question 4:Foot calluses are a hard layer of skin that are usually formed on t Continue reading >>

5 Questions (and Answers) About Gestational Diabetes

5 Questions (and Answers) About Gestational Diabetes

Pregnancy is an exciting and overwhelming time in a woman’s life. Learning that you have or may have gestational diabetes can really throw a wrench in an otherwise joyful experience. While developing gestational diabetes is certainly not ideal, it is not as scary as it seems. With timely testing and diligent health choices, gestational diabetes can be easily diagnosed and managed. Here are a few answers to common questions many women have about gestational diabetes: What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes (or GDM) occurs when a woman who has never had diabetes before pregnancy develops elevated levels of blood glucose (sugar) levels during pregnancy. It is thought that gestational diabetes affects up to 18% of pregnant women. Doctor’s don’t really know what causes GDM, but they have some theories. One of the most prevalent is that hormones from the placenta block the action of the mother’s insulin in her body. This is called insulin resistance and it makes it hard for the mother’s body to properly use insulin. Without enough insulin, glucose is unable to leave the bloodstream and be utilized for energy. Blood glucose can then build up to dangerous levels, which is called hyperglycemia. You will typically be tested for gestational diabetes between your 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. Testing is done by drawing blood after a screening glucose challenge test or an oral glucose tolerance test. For the screening test, you will drink a sugary beverage an hour before having your blood glucose checked. The glucose tolerance test involves having your blood glucose checked after having fasted (not eaten or drunk anything) for 8 hours. You will then be given a sugary drink and have your levels checked at 1, 2, and 3 hours. How is gestational diabetes treated? Continue reading >>

Diabetes Interview: 30 Questions

Diabetes Interview: 30 Questions

Sometimes, working on my own can feel slightly schizophrenic. I know you have tons of questions for me. And today you’ll get some of them answered! I’ve done an interview with none other than my fabulous self. I asked myself, included the ones from you (and googled some) questions to answer. So here we go, here is the GrainBrain.ch interview with Hanna Boëthius: Beginning GrainBrain: What type of diabetes do you have? Hanna Boëthius: I have Type 1 Diabetes. GB: How long have you had diabetes? HB: I was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 2, 29 years ago now. GB: How did you manage, growing up? Did you hide your diabetes? HB: I had my moments. Up until the age of about 10, my parents had full control of the diabetes and me. That’s also when I learned how to do my own injections, which gave me a little more freedom. I can’t say I ever took pride in having diabetes before. Being a teenager with T1D was difficult for me, I wanted nothing else than to be like “everybody else”, and I felt the diabetes hindered me in that. Starting at about age 16 I started hiding the diabetes more and more, at times even ignoring it. It was a stupid move on my part, as it brought me to the ICU on the night of my high school graduation with a life-threatening DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis), but luckily I survived, thanks to the excellent health care staff around me. This complete roller coaster of taking care of myself vs not doing it continued a few years after that too, purely because I didn’t achieve the results I was promised and that I was working towards. GB: Was it tough on your sibling, with you being the center of attention? HB: Oh yes, most definitely. What she actually feels about it, you’ll have to ask her, but I think she has found it very tough. GB: What was hard Continue reading >>

Diabetes Frequently Asked Questions

Diabetes Frequently Asked Questions

Treatment usually involves weight loss, exercise , and medication. Daily treatment helps control diabetes and may reduce the risk of complications. The two types of diabetes , insulin -dependent (type 1) and noninsulin-dependent (type 2), are different disorders. While the causes, short-term effects, and treatments for the two types differ, both can cause the same long-term health problems. Both types also affect the body's ability to use digested food for energy. Diabetes doesn't interfere with digestion, but it does prevent the body from using an important product of digestion, glucose (commonly known as sugar), for energy. After a meal the digestive system breaks some food down into sugar. The blood carries the sugar throughout the body, causing blood sugar levels to rise. In response to this rise the hormone insulin is released into the bloodstream to signal the body tissues to metabolize or burn the sugar for fuel, causing blood sugar levels to return to normal. A gland called the pancreas , found just behind the stomach , makes insulin . Sugar the body doesn't use right away goes to the liver , muscle, or fat for storage. In someone with diabetes, this process doesn't work correctly. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas doesn't produce insulin. This condition usually begins in childhood. People with this kind of diabetes must have daily insulin injections to survive. In people with type 2 diabetes the pancreas usually produces some insulin, but the body doesn't respond very well to the insulin signal and, therefore, doesn't metabolize the sugar properly, a condition called insulin resistance . Insulin resistance is an important factor in type 2 diabetes . Diabetes interferes with the body's use of food for energy. While type 1 and type 2 diabetes are dif Continue reading >>

False Hypo Symptoms: Diabetes Questions & Answers

False Hypo Symptoms: Diabetes Questions & Answers

False Hypo Symptoms: Diabetes Questions & Answers Q: I have had Type 1 diabetes for 40 years. Recently Ive been noticing low blood sugar feelings (glazed, unable to concentrate) even when my blood sugar levels are normal or high. Sometimes I even have ketones when this happens. Is this whats causing my symptoms? A: Symptoms of low blood glucose ( hypoglycemia ) tend to change over time. Most people who have had diabetes as long as you have lose the early warning signs (shaking, sweating, rapid heartbeat) and only experience cognitive (mental) symptoms, such as the ones you described. Interestingly, these types of symptoms can occur in different situations. Unusually high blood glucose, particularly when you dont spend a lot of time in a high range, can temporarily impair mental function and lead to tiredness, confusion, and mood changes. It is easy to confuse these with symptoms of hypoglycemia, so it is important to check your blood glucose whenever symptoms occur. You dont want to start popping glucose tablets when your blood glucose is 300 mg/dl (16.7 mmol/l). Another situation that can cause hypoglycemic symptoms is a rapid decline in blood glucose, such as falling from 300 (16.7) to 130 (7.2) within an hour. This may happen during intense exercise or when rapid-acting insulin is peaking. The rapid drop fools the brain into thinking that the blood glucose is low simply because it is coming down so fast. Since you mentioned ketones in your question, it is worth noting that the presence of ketones, with or without elevated glucose levels, can indicate a lack of insulin in the body, a lack of dietary carbohydrates or an infection that is causing intense insulin resistance. Regardless of the cause, ketones reflect a conversion from carbohydrate to fat metabolism, which Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Diet Questions And Answers

Diabetes - Diet Questions And Answers

Read this article to have your questions about diabetes and diet answered. Q: Will exercise help me to control my blood glucose levels? A: Yes. Doing regular exercise such as brisk walking will certainly help to control blood glucose levels and keep weight under control. Studies have shown that regular, moderately strenuous exercise reduces the risk of diabetes in normal and overweight individuals of both sexes. The positive effect of exercise on diabetes is believed to be due to an improvement in the way insulin works in the body and in glucose transport in muscles. Also keep in mind that regular exercise lowers the risk of heart disease which is often associated with diabetes. A: Walking briskly for 4 hours a week will use up nearly 8500 kJ per week. It is also easy to stick to this level of activity to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce weight. Always have a medical checkup and an exercise tolerance test before you start doing exercise, especially if you are older. Please take care to check your insulin levels regularly and to have some carbohydrate after you have exercised to prevent hypoglycaemia. A: Ideally diabetics should not be overweight , but it is also unrealistic to set your goals too high. Generally speaking a modest loss of 10% of body weight will improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance and reduce blood cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. So be realistic when you attempt to lose weight. Start off by deciding to lose 5 kg and when you succeed, then set your next goal. A: Yes, but in moderation. Artificial or non-nutritive sweeteners as they are also called, include saccharin, cyclamate, aspartame, and sucralose. Despite the fact that the safety of some of these products has been questioned, e.g. that cyclamates may cause bladder canc Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faq - Quick Answers To The Most Common Questions

Type 2 Diabetes Faq - Quick Answers To The Most Common Questions

Written by Amy Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is when your body doesnt use insulin properly. In type 2 diabetes, some people are insulin resistant, meaning that their body produces a lot of insulin but cant use it effectively.Some people with type 2 diabetes dont produce enough insulin. Type 2 is different from type 1 diabetes because in type 1, your body doesnt produce any insulin at all. Whether youre insulin resistant or have too little insulin, the end result is the same in type 2 diabetes:your blood glucose level is too high. What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes? The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop graduallyso gradually, in fact, that its possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms.Some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: For more information on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes, please read our article on type 2 symptoms . Type 2 diabetes has several causes:genetics and lifestyle are the most important ones.A combination of these factors can cause insulin resistance, when your body doesnt use insulin as well as it should.Insulin resistance is the most common cause of type 2 diabetes. To get more details on this, please read our article on the causes of type 2 diabetes . What are the risk factors for type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes has many risk factors associated with it, mostly related to lifestyle choices.But in order to develop insulin resistance (an inability for your body to use insulin as it should) and type 2 diabetes, you must also have a genetic abnormality.Along the same lines, some people with type 2 diabetes dont produce enough insulin; that is also due to a genetic abnormality. That is, not everyone can develop type 2 diabetes.Addi Continue reading >>

100 Questions & Answers About Diabetes

100 Questions & Answers About Diabetes

Michael Bryer-Ash, MD , Clinical Professor of Medicine, Associate Director, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Medical Director of Gonda Diabetes Center, University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California Whether youre a newly diagnosed patient, friend, or relative of someone suffering with diabetes, this book offers much-needed help.100 Questions & Answers AboutDiabetesgives authoritative, practical answers to common questionsaskedto provide you with a greater understanding of how to cope diabetes, including treatment options, sources of support, and much more. 100 Questions & Answers AboutDiabetes is an invaluable resource for anyone coping with thephysical and emotional turmoil of this disease. Part4What Are the Consequences of Diabetes? Part6Monitoring and Living with Diabetes Part8Resources for People with Diabetes Part9When a Family Member or Loved One Has Diabetes Part10What Does the Future Hold for People with Diabetes? Michael Bryer-Ash, MD-Clinical Professor of Medicine, Associate Director, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Medical Director of Gonda Diabetes Center, University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California MichaelBryer-Ash M.D. attended medical school at the University of London in England and received postgraduate training in internal medicine and endocrinology and metabolism at the University of London, Stanford University, the University of Chicago and the University of California, San Diego. He had been on the faculty of universities in Canada and the United States and was formerly the Director of the UCLA Gonda Diabetes Center as well as Associate Chief of the UCLA Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension. Dr Bryer-Ash has authored or co-auth Continue reading >>

Quiz: Diabetes Facts And Figures – Can You Answer These Questions?

Quiz: Diabetes Facts And Figures – Can You Answer These Questions?

How much do you know about diabetes? Diabetes is a widespread disease and it’s on the rise in populations all over the world. It occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or the body is unable to make use of the insulin it produces. Insulin is vital for ensuring the glucose we eat reaches the cells in our body to produce energy. Without it, the build-up of unused glucose can cause damage to the body and failure of various organs and tissues. Try this quiz to see how much you know and to learn more about diabetes. Good luck! Continue reading >>

Insulin And Diabetes: Your Questions Answered

Insulin And Diabetes: Your Questions Answered

Insulin and Diabetes: Your Questions Answered Insulin and Diabetes: Your Questions Answered People with diabetes often have to take insulin shots. Here are the answers to some common questions about insulin. People with diabetes often have to take insulin shots. If you or someone in your family has been diagnosed with diabetes, you may have a lot of questions about insulin. Here are some answers. What is insulin, and why is it important? Insulin is a hormone that helps your body use sugar. It is made by the pancreas, a large organ that lies behind your stomach. When you eat, your digestive system breaks the food down into simpler forms that the body can use. Most food is broken down into a form of sugar called glucose. Glucose travels through the body in the blood. Insulin helps glucose move from the bloodstream into the cells, where it can be used for energy, growth and repair. What does insulin have to do with diabetes? In healthy people, the pancreas releases the right amount of insulin to move glucose into the cells. But people with diabetes have a problem: People with type 1 diabetes don't make insulin. People with type 2 diabetes either don't make enough insulin or their bodies don't use it properly (which is called insulin resistance). Without the proper amount of insulin, glucose builds up in the blood and passes out of the body in the urine. This means the body loses its main source of energy. High blood sugar also damages the blood vessels and nerves throughout the body, which can lead to serious problems. Taking insulin shots helps correct the balance between blood sugar and insulin in the body. All people with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin. Some people with type 2 diabetes take insulin. Can insulin be taken as a pill instead of a shot? No. At this ti Continue reading >>

Smart Answers To Annoying Diabetes Questions

Smart Answers To Annoying Diabetes Questions

Smart Answers to Annoying Diabetes Questions Smart Answers to Annoying Diabetes Questions My family and I get a lot of questions from the rest of the world about living with diabetes. Sometimes the questions are smart and come from the right place. But many other times, they are infused with judgement and infuriate us . Sometimes they simply confound us. Sometimes they make us snort. For those of you who struggle to answer the perplexing questions you may get out in the wild, Ive compiled this list of suggested replies. Feel free to adopt, share, tweak and use. And if you have some great answers, add them in the comments. This is the kind of public support and service the Diabetes Online Community is great for. Read on. Question: How are your/your childs numbers? Answer: Oh, thank you for asking. Im finding that sometimes they are even numbers, and sometimes they are odd. Every once in a while they are divisible by three, but thankfully, they are almost never prime numbers. Ha ha can you imagine a prime number? OMG. One time last week she had numbers that were multiples of 10. Twice in one day! Thats about where we are at. Answer: Funny you should ask. I know the government is really into regulating commerce, and certainly the airlines. Or are they into de-regulating? Whatever But in all the research Ive done, Ive not found a case of them regulating people with diabetes. If she is supposed to be regulated and I failed to do that? I sure hope we dont get caught! Question: Can I catch diabetes from you/your child? Answer: Listen, buddy: Ive seen you on the field. You are way more of a designated hitter. Dont even TRY to catch. Okay? Question: Do you have the bad kind of diabetes or the good kind? Answer: Thats such a great question. I think I have the good kind. Because Continue reading >>

Diabetes Frequently Asked Questions

Diabetes Frequently Asked Questions

Diabetic FAQ aims to simplify diabetes questions from around the web. You can use the search to ask any question you may have. If we are missing an answer let us know , we canresearch the information for youand add the answer to our index. Once wepublish your answer, we notify you via email. What are the benefits of asking questions? Getting a diabetes question answered properly can improve your diet , it can help you understand the cause of each symptom youre feeling, and recommend suggestions to ask your doctor about treatment. At Diabetic FAQ we collect answers from multiple trusted sources around the web, the information we provide is only for self knowledge and we advise you to double check our answers with your doctor, every case is different and your doctor knows your condition. Do not use Diabetic FAQs research to self diagnose yourself or to treat any symptoms. Our goal is to provide people with answers to all diabetes questions. If we do not have an answer to one of your questions, we will be more than happy to answer it for you here . Continue reading >>

8 Common Diabetes Questions Answered

8 Common Diabetes Questions Answered

Health.com -- Nearly 24 million Americans have diabetes; another 57 million have prediabetes, a precursor to the disease. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that if the diabetes epidemic continues, one in three Americans will develop it in his or her lifetime. That's especially bad news for women, because the disease can affect both mother and child during pregnancy, and women with diabetes are more likely to have a heart attack (and at a younger age) than women without diabetes. Along with the worries about diabetes, there's a lot of misinformation (like skinny girls can't get the disease, or eating too much candy causes it), which is why we've gathered expert answers to the most common questions. What's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. It's most often diagnosed in patients under 18, but it can strike at any age. Type 1 diabetics need insulin to manage the disease. In type 2 diabetes, the body loses its sensitivity to insulin, the hormone that helps muscles absorb and use blood sugar. Traditionally, type 2 diabetes was diagnosed in older people. But with the rise in obesity, it's now being diagnosed at younger ages, sometimes even in children. Some traditionally thin populations are also being diagnosed with the disease as well. Type 2 is generally treated with changes to diet and exercise habits, as well as oral medication or insulin. How will I know if I have diabetes? Diabetes may cause no symptoms at all, but some signs include frequent thirst and hunger, having to urinate more than usual, losing weight without trying to, fatigue, and crankiness. If you're concerned, get your blood-glucose level checked, says Deborah Fillm Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Questions And Answers With The Experts

Type 1 Diabetes: Questions And Answers With The Experts

Type 1 Diabetes: Questions and Answers with the Experts Daily type 1 diabetes (T1D) management can be challenging for adults or children living with the disease, as well as for their parents or caregivers. We asked two diabetes experts, Desmond Schatz, M.D., and Anne Peters, M.D., to share with us the most frequently asked questions they hear in their practices. Their answers will help children and adults alike learn a little more about the disease and how to help manage it better. Both Dr. Schatz and Dr. Peters have seen many people, young and old, with T1D, and they recognize that, although the diagnosis can be scary at first, with the right help and support people with T1D can live long and healthy lives. FAQs for children with T1D and their parents Desmond Schatz, M.D., is a pediatric endocrinologist, associate chair of pediatrics, and director of the Diabetes Center at the University of Florida. Dr. Schatz has treated children with T1D for 25 years, and he directs clinical trials aimed at finding a way to prevent and reverse the disease. No one in our family has diabetes, how did our child get T1D? Dr. Schatz: Up front we can say its no ones fault that your child got diabetes. We dont know what causes T1D, although we believe that it results from a complex interaction among genes, the environment, and the immune system. In the United States, the risk of getting T1D is roughly one in 300, but when one family member is affected, the risk increases to one in 20, indicating that genes are involved. But almost 90 percent of people with T1D do not have a family history of the disease. Moreover, T1D is increasing in epidemic proportions, with a 23 percent rise in the prevalence of T1D in people under 20 years old between 2001 and 2009. Worldwide, the number of youth who Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions About Diabetes

Frequently Asked Questions About Diabetes

Contact > CDA > Information and Support Services > Frequently Asked Questions about Diabetes Frequently Asked Questions about Diabetes Have a question about diabetes? Get quick answers to the most frequently asked questions. If your question is not answered below, please feel free to call us at 1-800-BANTING (226-8464) or email us at [email protected] . I have just been recently diagnosed, what should I do? Whether you have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you can live a long and healthy life by eating healthy, being physically active, and taking medications (if prescribed) to keep your blood glucose (sugar) in your target range. Read about Treatments & Management and learn more in our Healthy Living Resources . Online tools are also available from Taking Charge of My Diabetes . Visiting a diabetes education center (DEC) is a great way to learn more about diabetes and how to manage your blood sugar. To find a DEC near you, contact Diabetes Canada by calling toll-free at 1-800-BANTING (226-8464) or email [email protected] . Diabetes can be diagnosed with different blood tests taken at a lab. Many people have no symptoms of diabetes. If you are over the age of 40 or are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, you should have you blood sugar checked. For information on the signs and symptoms and the lab values that indicate diabetes, visit Signs & Symptoms . What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes and their causes? Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune disease which affects the persons ability to make any insulin. People with type 2 diabetes do make insulin but it may not be enough, or their bodies cannot use the insulin that is made. There is no known cause for type 1 diabetes, but some things can increase a persons risk for type Continue reading >>

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