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Puppy Diagnosed With Diabetes

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

There are two forms of diabetes in dogs: diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is sometimes called "drinking diabetes" and diabetes mellitus is also known as "sugar diabetes". Diabetes insipidus is a very rare disorder that results in failure to regulate body water content. Diabetes mellitus is more common in dogs, and is frequently diagnosed in dogs five years of age or older. This is also known as adult-onset diabetes. There is a congenital form that occurs in puppies called juvenile diabetes, but this is rare in dogs. Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas. This is a small but vital organ located near the stomach. It has two significant populations of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta-cells, produce the hormone insulin. Simply put, diabetes mellitus is a failure of the pancreatic beta cells to regulate blood sugar. Some people with diabetes take insulin shots, and others take oral medication. Is this true for dogs? In humans, two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of disease differ somewhat between the two groups. Most dogs with diabetes mellitus will require daily insulin injections to regulate their blood glucose. Type I or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta-cells. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilise blood glucose levels. Type II or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus is different because some insulin-producing cells remain. However, the amount produced is insufficient, there is a Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Detection

Diagnosis And Detection

Diabetes is one of many conditions that can affect your dog and cause visible changes in behavior and other signs. That’s why it is important that your dog be thoroughly examined by a veterinarian at least once a year or more frequently, if your veterinarian advises. Knowing the signs of diabetes is the first step in protecting your dog’s health. If any of these statements describes your pet, speak with your veterinarian about the possibility of diabetes: Drinks more water than usual (polydipsia) Urinates more frequently, produces more urine per day, or has “accidents” in the house (polyuria) Always acts hungry (polyphagia), but maintains or loses weight Has cloudy eyes When evaluating your dog for diabetes, your veterinarian may ask about these signs and will check your dog’s general health to rule out the possibility of other conditions or infections. In addition, your veterinarian will test your dog’s urine for the presence of glucose and ketones and, if indicated, will then measure your dog’s blood glucose concentration. A diagnosis of diabetes only becomes definite when glucose is found in the urine and at a persistently high concentration in the blood. Drinking large quantities of water, urinating frequently, and eating more than usual (or begging more often for food) all suggest the possibility of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes is more common in older pets, but it can also occur in younger or pregnant pets. The disease is more manageable if it is detected early and managed with the help of your veterinarian. The good news is that with proper monitoring, treatment, and diet and exercise, diabetic pets can lead long and happy lives. Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a condition that occurs when the body can not use glucose (a type of sugar) normally. Glucose is the main source of energy for the body’s cells. The levels of glucose in the blood are primarily controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made by the pancreas. As food passes through the intestines during digestion, sugars are one of the nutrients absorbed from the food. The sugars are transported into the cells that line the intestines and are converted into simple sugars (including) glucose. The simple sugars are then absorbed into the bloodstream for circulation and delivery to the whole body’s tissues and cells. Insulin is required for the transfer of glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. If there is not enough insulin or the body is unable to use the insulin, glucose accumulates in high levels in the blood – a condition called hyperglycemia. When the blood glucose reaches a certain level, the glucose overflows into the urine (this is called glucosuria) and draws large volumes of water with it. This is why diabetic pets often drink more water and urinate more frequently and in larger amounts. In diabetics, regardless of the source of the sugar or the amount of sugar in the blood, there is not enough glucose transported into the body’s cells. As a result, there is not enough energy for the cells to function normally, and, the tissues become starved for energy. This state of metabolic “starvation” caus Continue reading >>

Nine Signs Your Pet Could Have Diabetes

Nine Signs Your Pet Could Have Diabetes

Over 1.4 million pets in the U.S. suffer from diabetes mellitus, a condition in which the blood sugar (glucose) level is too high. One in every 500 dogs and one in 200 cats develops diabetes. Certain breeds are predisposed to the condition, for example Samoyeds, Australian Terriers, Schnauzers, Toy Poodles and Burmese cats. However, regardless of breed, the incidence of diabetes in companion animals is rising at an alarming rate, resulting in an unprecedented number of sick pets. What Exactly Is Diabetes? The condition of diabetes results from a shortage or misuse of insulin in your pet’s body. The problem can be caused by either a reduced production of insulin (commonly known in humans as juvenile or Type I diabetes), or because your dog’s or cat’s body isn’t using insulin efficiently (Type II diabetes) due to insulin resistance. Insulin is an anabolic hormone whose job it is to move not just sugar, but also amino acids, electrolytes and fatty acids into the cells of your pet’s body. A lack of insulin will cause these vital substances to remain outside the cells. This causes the cells to starve while surrounded by the very nutrients they need to survive. If there is sufficient insulin being produced in your pet’s body, but the cells don’t use the nutrients they receive properly, the result is the same – cells starved for nutrients. Juvenile diabetes is rare in pets. Most of the time, diabetes in companion animals is life-style induced. I’ll discuss this in more detail in part 2 of this series. Adult onset diabetes typically shows itself when your pet reaches midlife, after she has encountered enough lifestyle obstacles to induce either decreased production of insulin or a diminished ability to use it efficiently. Symptoms of Diabetes in Your Dog or Ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes in dogs is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. After a dog eats, his digestive system breaks food into various components, including glucose-which is carried into his cells by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas. When a dog does not produce insulin or cannot utilize it normally, his blood sugar levels elevate. The result is hyperglycemia, which, if left untreated, can cause many complicated health problems for a dog. It is important to understand, however, that diabetes is considered a manageable disorder-and many diabetic dogs can lead happy, healthy lives. Diabetes can be classified as either Type 1 (lack of insulin production) or Type II (impaired insulin production along with an inadequate response to the hormone.) The most common form of the disease in dogs is Type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes, which occurs when the pancreas is incapable of producing or secreting adequate levels of insulin. Dogs who have Type I require insulin therapy to survive. Type II diabetes is found in cats and is a lack of normal response to insulin. The following symptoms should be investigated as they could be indicators that your dog has diabetes: Change in appetite Excessive thirst/increase in water consumption Weight loss Increased urination Unusually sweet-smelling or fruity breath Lethargy Dehydration Urinary tract infections Vomiting Cataract formation, blindness The exact cause of diabetes is unknown. However, autoimmune disease, genetics, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, certain medications and abnormal protein deposits in the pancreas can play a major role in the development of the disease. It is thought that obese dogs and female dogs may run a greater risk of developing diabetes later in life (6-9 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Puppy - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Diabetic Puppy - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Diabetes Discussion: Your Dog Anything related to your diabetic dog. We have a 12 week old German Shepherd puppy who was diagnosed with diabetes at 8 weeks. She had already developed ketosis, we almost lost her. Her health is currently good and the insulin seems to be doing it's job. Our vet says in her 20+ years experience she has never encountered a puppy this young with diabetes this serious. We were advised that if we did not have her put down it would be a long road. Obviously, we did NOT put her down; however, we are really struggling with the frequent urination. Every morning we have to mop our laundry room (and it is REALLY sticky) and we have to bathe her as she seems to urinate on herself while sleeping. She is ALWAYS extremely thirsty (she even jumps in the bathtub looking for water) and will drink until she vomits if allowed. We need some helpful suggestions quickly as we are in unchartered waters. HELP!!!!! - what does she eat and how many times per day? - how is her blood sugar being monitored? The main challenge with a young diabetic dog is that their insulin needs change as they grow and develop - generally going higher over time. But spaying tends to have the effect of lowering the insulin requirement as it reduces the hormones produced and those hormones contribute to high blood sugar. In fact, occasionally a female dog is diabetic only while in heat and the diabetes goes away once spayed. Rare but it does happen. And the insulin requirement can go from none off of cycle to a large dose during heat so it's a huge rollercoaster. I'm anxious to hear more. Welcome to the forum... and I'll bet she's adorable! I got in touch with someone who has been in your predicament literally... Lisa and her dog Hero. She sent me the following reply and is happy to ans Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed Puppy - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Newly Diagnosed Puppy - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Diabetes Discussion: Your Dog Anything related to your diabetic dog. Hi there, our almost 5 month old Newfoundland puppy has just been diagnosed with diabetes! It is a shock to us, and we don't have a clue how to handle this. The vet showed us how to take care of giving him his shots and what to watch for, but we could really just use some advice tips, or even encouragement to let us know that it isn't as bad as it sounds? If that's true. He is such an awesome puppy and we love him so much, that we are so scared about this diagnosis. What does it mean for him? Does it shorten his life? Is our vet just being nice by telling us that he should still be a normal dog? Can he still become a therapy dog like planned? Is this our fault? Should we be upset with the breeder? There are so many questions and worries racing thru our heads, any advice would be great.... we have seen some puppies here . Nobody actively posting but you maybe able to search them out or they may see your post my jesse was diagnosed when she was 5.5 and she is 12 . still having fun chasing rabbits there was another newfie on here jim's spirit you might want to check out that thread .he was not a puppy but the dose he was on was substantially lower than a normal starting dose i believe he thought the breeds metabolism was slower which meant a much lower dose than normal i think he got 15 to 18 units twice a day which is quite small for a dog over a 100 pounds . so something to consider with your pup Its going to be challenging until your pup gets to adulthood with growing still and that possibly causing a change in the dose of insulin I would recommend testing blood sugar at home its a lifetime commitment and you want to keep your pup safe . large breeds are easy to test . i use the inner lip on jesse no Continue reading >>

You Just Learned Your Pet Has Diabetes

You Just Learned Your Pet Has Diabetes

The first day Commitment, patience & education Expenses Your emotions People think you're crazy Your social life The bottom line I wrote this essay to help people whose pet has recently (or not so recently) been diagnosed with diabetes. Many of the things discussed below will probably go through your thoughts. Hopefully this will help you understand your new situation and you won't feel so overwhelmed. The First Day The initial shock and fear you feel when the vet tells you that your pet has diabetes can be overwhelming. Diabetes is a treatable condition and your pet can live a normal, happy, healthy life. Diabetes is not a death sentence for your pet. A question that is often asked is “My pet is older, should I put him to sleep”. This is a very complicated issue and depends on the overall health of your pet. Age alone should not be the deciding factor in determining whether to treat your diabetic pet or whether to euthanize it. Many older pets have been diagnosed with diabetes and with commitment and loving care, they have lived many more years. Our cat was diagnosed at age 14, and after almost three years with diabetes he is very healthy and happy. There are diabetic cats and dogs that are quite elderly (18 years old or more) and are in very good health. You may want to read some of the Quality of Life stories that are on this site. Commitment, Patience and Education Caring for a diabetic pet takes a very strong commitment from both the owner / caregiver and the vet. You must provide a very high level of care for your pet on a daily basis. Gone are the days of putting out food and water, giving a quick pat on the head, and hurrying out the door. Every day you will have to give your pet medication, feed a proper diet, and watch his behavior. But don’t get the imp Continue reading >>

Top Ten Signs Your Pet Has Diabetes

Top Ten Signs Your Pet Has Diabetes

Recognize the Pet Diabetes Epidemic November is nationally recognized as American Diabetes Month, a month focused on raising awareness about diabetes in people. Not as commonly known is that November is also recognized as Pet Diabetes Awareness Month. A growing epidemic amongst our pets, recognizing and spreading awareness about diabetes in dogs and cats is vital to helping pet owners spot and treat the disorder early. Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Dogs can have diabetes just like humans - both Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetic dogs are increasingly common, but the disease is entirely manageable unless left untreated. MY DOG HAS DIABETES: OVERVIEW 1. If your dog shows symptoms of diabetes (described below), seek veterinary care at once. 2. Work with your vet to determine the right type of insulin and the right dose for your individual dog. 3. Take your dog for frequent veterinary checkups. 4. Learn how to give insulin injections and reward your dog for accepting them. 5. Consistently feed your diabetic dog the same type of food at the same time of day. 6. Report any unusual symptoms or reactions to your vet. For years public health officials have reported a diabetes epidemic among America’s children and adults. At the same time, the rate of canine diabetes in America has more than tripled since 1970, so that today it affects about 1 in every 160 dogs. But while many human cases are caused and can be treated by diet, for dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires careful blood sugar monitoring and daily insulin injections. The medical term for the illness is diabetes mellitus (mellitus is a Latin term that means “honey sweet,” reflecting the elevated sugar levels the condition produces in urine and blood). Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin to metabolize food for energy, or when the body’s cells fail to utilize insulin properly. The pancreas’s inability to produce insulin is known in humans as type 1 (formerly called juvenile or insulin-dependent) diabetes. This is analogous to the type that affects virtually all dogs. Dogs can also develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Type 2 (formerly adult onset) diabetes, which is the result of insulin resistance often l Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Common In Puppies?

Is Diabetes Common In Puppies?

Is it common for puppies to get diabetes? If so, can it go into remission so that she doesn’t need shots for the rest of her life? Laura Concord, NH Diabetes is very uncommon in puppies. Diabetes mellitus (known simply as diabetes) is a common disease of cats and dogs. It occurs when the body is unable to regulate blood sugar levels. Diabetic animals have chronically high levels of sugar in their blood. The most common symptoms of diabetes are increased thirst, increased appetite, and weight loss. Diabetes is a life-threatening syndrome that must be treated. In my experience, diabetes is most common in middle aged animals. I have never diagnosed diabetes in a puppy or kitten. I have, however, seen high blood sugar levels in puppies and kittens. Very young animals may develop temporarily high levels of sugar in their blood after meals or after treatment with IV fluids that contain sugar. They are also prone to episodes of low blood sugar when they haven’t eaten for long periods. I am therefore wondering about the circumstances of your puppy’s diagnosis with diabetes. Have multiple blood sugar tests yielded high results? Is there sugar in her urine? Has her blood sugar been tested after she has been fasted for several hours? If your veterinarian has performed rigorous testing and concluded that your puppy is diabetic, then you will have to administer insulin. Some animals do experience remission from diabetes and do not require injections for their entire lives. If your vet hasn’t performed the sort of testing listed above, I’d recommend it. There may be a chance that your puppy isn’t diabetic after all. For more information on canine diabetes, visit my website: And there also is information on feline diabetes: Photo: Tina was diabetic, but not when she was a Continue reading >>

Testing For Canine Diabetes

Testing For Canine Diabetes

Introduction Canine diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder of the endocrine system that occurs when the pancreas is unable to produce an adequate supply of insulin, or alternatively when a dog’s cells are unable to take up the insulin that is produced. If your dog is showing clinical signs that are suggestive of diabetes mellitus, your veterinarian will run a series of tests to confirm the diagnosis. Several other diseases can cause the same or similar symptoms as canine diabetes mellitus, so several tests are usually necessary to rule out other conditions and to confirm a definitive diagnosis of diabetes. Testing for Diabetes Mellitus in Dogs Your veterinarian will conduct a thorough physical examination to assess your dog’s general health. She probably will ask you about any changes in your dog’s behavior and body, such as increased or decreased urination, thirst or appetite, weight loss or lethargy, among other possible signs. Some tests are fairly standard in the assessment of diabetes. A urine sample will be collected and tested for the presence of glucose or bacteria in the urine. A bladder or urinary tract infection can mimic the clinical signs of diabetes, but also commonly accompanies the disease. Blood samples will be analyzed for a number of things, especially for the levels of blood glucose, cholesterol and liver enzymes. Your dog likely will need to fast for 12-24 hours before this particular blood test, to ensure accurate results. A single blood test may not be sufficient for a definitive diagnosis, so additional tests may be necessary. Some other things your veterinarian may recommend include abdominal ultrasound and assessment of serum thyroid hormone concentration, serum pancreatic enzyme levels, blood progersterone concentration in intact female Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

A healthy dog has a blood glucose level ranging from 75 mg to 120 mg. A dog is diagnosed with high blood sugar, or as hyperglycemic, when it exhibits high blood glucose, or sugar above the normal range. Elevated blood sugar may be temporary, stress-induced, or a sign of a serious underlying disease such as pancreatitis or diabetes mellitus. High blood sugar is more common in female than male dogs, and is more likely to occur in older dogs. Elevated blood glucose can occur transiently fairly often for various reasons (diet, stress, exertion, medications). Moderately elevated glucose can indicate infections (dental, kidneys, bladder), inflammatory conditions (pancreatitis) and hormonal imbalances (Hyperadrenocorticism). However persistent high glucose levels in the blood is diagnostic of Diabetes Mellitus. High blood Sugar causes increased thirst and urination. See a veterinarian promptly if your dogs shows these symptoms. The warning signs for high blood sugar are varied. If your dog’s high blood sugar is temporary or the result of stress or medication, you may not see any symptoms. However, if it is the result of a serious disease, you will likely see some of the following: Wounds not healing; infections worsening Depression Enlarged liver Urinary tract or kidney infection Bloodshot eyes Cataracts Extreme fluctuation in weight, gaining or losing Obesity Hyperactivity Excessive thirst or hunger Increased frequency of urination High blood sugar can indicate one of the following issues: Diabetes mellitus, caused by a loss of pancreatic beta cells, which leads to decreased production of insulin, rending the dog unable to process sugar sufficiently. Pancreatitis, inflammation of the pancreas, which can damage insulin-producing cells, inhibiting the dog’s ability to proce Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Overview of diabetes insipidus Most everyone is familiar with the term “diabetes;” it is a common human disease. But our four-legged friends can get diabetes, too. There are different types of diabetes, one being diabetes insipidus—an uncommon disorder that affects our pet’s ability to conserve water. Because of this disease, your dog or cat urinates and drinks water excessively in an attempt to keep up with the loss of water through the urine. There are two types of diabetes insipidus. One is due to the insufficient production of a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) that regulates the body’s ability to absorb water from the kidneys. The other form of diabetes insipidus is caused by the kidneys’ inability to respond to ADH. The kidneys are responsible for regulating the water in your pet’s body. So, without this hormone or the kidney’s response to it, your dog or cat can’t conserve water. Access to water is critical for pets with diabetes insipidus—without it, a dog or cat can become dehydrated in as little as 4–6 hours. Generally, diabetes insipidus is considered idiopathic, which means the ultimate cause is unknown. Possible causes include congenital issues, trauma, metabolic conditions, kidney disease, adverse reactions to certain medications, or tumors of the pituitary gland. Despite the underlying cause of diabetes insipidus, the symptoms are the same. They include: Diagnosis of diabetes insipidus Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam and take a detailed history of your pet’s health. The symptoms of diabetes insipidus are very similar to other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus (“sugar diabetes”), Cushing’s syndrome, liver or kidney disease, Addison’s disease, and hypo-/hyperthyroidism. Your veterinarian may Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes cant be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus , or sugar diabetes, is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the bodys cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: Glucose: essential fuel for the bodys cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a gatekeeper that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isnt working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: Insulin-deficiency diabetesThis is when the dogs body isnt producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. Insulin-resistance diabetesThis is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dogs body isnt utilizing the insulin as it should. The cells arent responding to the insulins message, so glucose isnt being pulled Continue reading >>

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