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Punctureless Glucose Meter

Glucose Meters: What's On The Horizon?

Glucose Meters: What's On The Horizon?

If you've got diabetes, regular blood glucose (sugar) testing is a fact of life. And getting your all-important glucose level has become easier. Today's glucose meters are more sensitive, and require less blood -- which likely equates with less pain. That advance has been a big one for people with diabetes. But will the "ouch" ever go away? Researchers are hard at work -- developing special contact lenses, fluorescent "tattoos," infrared devices, and smart sensors to decipher your glucose levels -- with them being "ouchless" as their goal. In some cases, no blood testing is required -- maybe one prick at the most. Guenther Boden, MD, chief of endocrinology at Temple University School of Medicine, has monitored developments in this field over the last few decades. "The GlucoWatch Biographer seemed like the answer," Boden tells WebMD. "The underside of the watch has a membrane that can suck interstitial fluid through the skin; get 'juice' out of skin, so to speak. And that's what you need to measure glucose; you need to get some body fluid. The technology seems to work. But skin irritation has been a problem for some people." That problem is being corrected, says Audrey Finkelstein, a spokeswoman for Animas Corporation, the product's maker. "We are presently working on Biographer III, which will combine the Biographer with tiny microneedles that will extract fluid to provide a better blood sample than is possible with other technologies. It will also greatly reduce or even eradicate skin irritation." Products like GlucoWatch are good at alerting patients to impending danger -- especially necessary during sleep hours. "It's a dangerous thing for people to buy a product like this, thinking they won't need to do finger sticks anymore ... You simply can't replace finger stick Continue reading >>

Glucometers Faq: What They Are And How They Work

Glucometers Faq: What They Are And How They Work

Glucometers FAQ: What They Are and How They Work Page 1:Glucometers FAQs - General Questions Dignifyed is an online resource devoted to reviewing technology and services aimed at preserving seniors' independence and quality of life. How many hours of hands-on testing and research did you perform for this review? We spent over 80 hours researching the best glucometers on the market. We started with 30 models and narrowed down our choices to the best 10 glucometers to do our hands-on evaluations and reviews. Because of the level of testing that would have been required and given that glucometers must meet specific FDA regulations for accuracy we did not test the accuracy of the glucometers we reviewed. Instead, we researched glucometers and evaluated them based on their design, features, cost and ease of use. You can read more about our evaluation and research process here . Glucometers provide readings by detecting the level of glucose in a person's blood. To get a reading, a person pricks the skin most commonly, a finger and applies the blood sample gained to a test strip inserted in the meter. The glucose in the blood reacts with the chemicals in the strip. Then, electrical currents pass through, determining the level of glucose in the sample and providing numerical results within seconds. Self-Monitoring Blood Glucose (SMBG) Meters: These are the most basic and typical meters that utilize test strips and small blood samples. Meters and test strips are available over the counter in stores and online. Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs): This type of monitoring requires a sensor to be implanted under the skin to take readings every few minutes throughout the day and night. They require approval from and implantation by your medical doctor. Noninvasive Glucometers: These Continue reading >>

Bloodless Glucometer Uses Light To Check Blood Sugar In 20 Seconds Or Less

Bloodless Glucometer Uses Light To Check Blood Sugar In 20 Seconds Or Less

When will diabetics in the U.S. get a bloodless glucometer that will allow them to check their blood sugar without a finger prick? The short answer is, we don’t know for sure. But a company that’s wrapped up initial testing of its bloodless glucometer and closed a series B round of financing thinks it has a good shot at becoming the “first noninvasive technology with a real shot at diagnostic accuracy,” in the words of its CEO. Grove Instruments’ Optical Bridge technology uses near-infrared spectroscopy to measure a person’s real-time blood sugar in less than 20 seconds. The company’s first product is an accessory-free, battery-operated personal glucose meter used on the fingertip or earlobe. Grove is one of several companies working on a noninvasive diabetes test using spectroscopy including DIRAmed, C8 MediSensors and InLight Solutions. Challenges in developing devices using this technique have included water interference and low signal-to-noise ratio, but Grove thinks it has developed solutions to these problems. “Yes, we work in near-infrared spectroscopy space, but our methodology and our particular construct is unique within the space,” said CEO Arthur Combs. “We have strong validation that we have unique technology.” That validation has come in the form of funding through 10 SBIR grants awarded by the NIDDK NIH and a loan from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center Accelerator Program, Combs said. It’s also come in the form of results from a large study conducted last fall to test the device’s measurements against standard blood glucose determination. The company collected nearly 4,000 data pairs; the results, which are pending publication, indicate that the device was able to meet the ISO 15197 standard for accuracy, Combs said. Over th Continue reading >>

Apple Ceo Tim Cook Test-drove A Device That Tracks His Blood Sugar, Hinting At Apple's Interest In The Space

Apple Ceo Tim Cook Test-drove A Device That Tracks His Blood Sugar, Hinting At Apple's Interest In The Space

Tim Cook has been spotted at the Apple campus test-driving a device that tracks blood sugar, which was connected to his Apple Watch. A source said that Cook was wearing a prototype glucose-tracker on the Apple Watch, which points to future applications that would make the device a "must have" for millions of people with diabetes -- or at risk for the disease. As CNBC reported last month, Apple has a team in Palo Alto working on the "holy grail" for diabetes: Non-invasive and continuous glucose monitoring. The current glucose trackers on the market rely on tiny sensors penetrating the skin. Sources said the company is already conducting feasibility trials in the Bay Area. Tim Cook also talked about the device to a roomful of students in February at the University of Glasgow, where he received an honorary degree. He didn't say if it was a medical device from a company like Medtronic or Dexcom, or an Apple prototype. "I've been wearing a continuous glucose monitor for a few weeks," he said. "I just took it off before coming on this trip." Cook explained that he was able to understand how his blood sugar responded to foods he was eating. He made modifications to keep his blood sugar more constant. In Silicon Valley, a huge health trend is low-carb, high fat diets. Increasingly, venture capitalists and executives are finding that if they cut down their sugar consumption, they see dramatic results including increased productivity and weight loss. Cook has a lot of interest in personal health. For instance, he's also an active gym-goer, and recently told CNBC's Jim Cramer that he has lost 30 pounds. At the University of Glasgow, he reiterated Apple's commitment to the health space and spoke about the struggles faced by people with diabetes. "It's mentally anguishing to stick y Continue reading >>

3.3 Safe Diabetes Care

3.3 Safe Diabetes Care

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video From the course by The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Learn about the role of environment in disease transmission and how to implement standard and transmission-based precautions to prevent the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria and other infections in your facility. The goal of this module is to identify how to protect residents and staff using safe injection practices and safe diabetes care. To obtain CE Credit for this module: Take the Quiz and complete the evaluation at the end of the module, you will be directed to your course completion certificate. North Carolina Statewide Program for Infection Control and Epidemiology (SPICE) Another means of spreading blood borne pathogens is through unsafe diabetes care. This under appreciated area of risk has been the mode of transmission for As mentioned earlier, there have been twenty three hepatitis B virus outbreaks associated with the assisted monitoring of blood glucose. 92 percent of all hepatitis B virus outbreaks in long term care facilities. The outbreaks have been linked to the infection control breaches shown here. Including sharing of blood glucose meters without disinfection and cleaning between uses, use of finger stick devices or insulin pens for multiple people, and failure to perform hand hygiene or change gloves between procedures. Sharing glucometers without proper disinfection is the most common breech. If all health care providers know and practice these three simple rules for the knowledge gap that contributes to outbreaks will be significantly reduced. If new knowledge is applied to implement safe practices, great strides could be made in preventing devastating out breaks. W Continue reading >>

How To Use A Glucometer

How To Use A Glucometer

First, set out your glucometer, a test strip, a lancet and an alcohol prep pad. Wash your hands to prevent infection.If you are not by a sink, it is okay to just use the alcohol swab and vice versa. If you are by a sink and wash your hands thoroughly, you do not have to use an alcohol swab. Decide where you are going to obtain the blood from the standard choice is from a finger . Some monitors let you use, alternative site testing, such as your forearm or another less sensitive place. Before you use an alternate site,discuss this with your doctor and check the instructions for your glucometer. Sometimes it helps to warm your hands first to make the blood flow easier. You can rub your hands together briskly or run them under warm water. If you run them under hot water, be sure to dry them well as wet hands can dilute the blood sample, resulting in a lower number. Turn on the glucometer and place a test strip in the machine when the machine is ready. Watch the indicator for placing the blood on the strip. Make sure your hand is dry and wipe the area you've selected with an alcohol prep pad and wait until the alcohol evaporates. Pierce your fingertip on the side of your finger, between the bottom of your fingernail to the tip of your nail (avoid the pads as this can pinch more). The type of drop of blood is determined by the type of strip you are using (some use a "hanging drop" of blood versus a small drop for strips that draw blood in with a capillary action). Place the drop of blood on or at the side of the strip. The glucometer will take a few moments to calculate the blood sugar reading. Follow your doctor's orders for whatever blood sugar reading you get. You may use the alcohol prep pad to blot the site where you drew the blood if it is still bleeding. Write down y Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing Goes Wireless, Painless For Diabetes Patients

Blood Sugar Testing Goes Wireless, Painless For Diabetes Patients

Open this photo in gallery: Now that is cool: Testing your sugar without needles and without blood droplets. In Europe, the medical company Abbott has just released its FreeStyle Libre system, which may usher in a revolution in diabetes care. And both doctors and patients can't wait. Prabahar Gopalakrishnan, 26, is a type 1 diabetic who has taken daily insulin injections since the age of seven. "I've probably pricked my fingers almost 15,000 times so far," he tells me. When I tell him about the new system, he finds it hard to believe. "You mean I might never have to poke myself again?" Chandroutie Permaul, a 65-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, also finds routine self-testing problematic. "My flesh gets so tender," she complains. "And when I wash the dishes, it just burns and burns." These hassles may soon be a thing of the past. The Libre system uses an advanced, coin-size sensor that is worn on the arm for two weeks at a time. According to the instructions, a tiny "filament is inserted just under the skin and held in place with a small adhesive pad." It comes with a hand-held scanner which looks like a largish smartphone. Swiping the scanner over the sensor instantly measures your sugar, displaying the result in "less than one second." Speaking at the European launch in Vienna, Jared Watkin, a technology vice-president at Abbott, also demonstrated that you can even scan the sensor "through your clothes." You don't even need to calibrate the system with a test drop of blood. That's remarkable – and unheard of in the diabetes world. "Patients would fly with this," says Dr. Susan Burlacoff, a Toronto family physician. She believes there will be great utility of this bloodless system in her own practice. "It's painless, convenient, without needles and [patients] woul Continue reading >>

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar

How Do You Monitor Your Blood Sugar? Monitoring and tightly controlling your blood sugar level can significantly reduce the risk of complications due to diabetes and provide you with a higher quality of life. Knowledge of your blood sugar levels at different times of the day is an essential input into your diabetes care plan and allows you and your medical team to work out and modify your plan for medication, diet and exercise. The heart of the system to monitor your blood sugar is the blood glucose meter and the automatic lancing device used to obtain your blood sample. There are many types of glucose meters with varying degrees of sophistication and abilities to store test results. Your doctor or nurse will recommend the type best for you. You will need to be familiar with the manufacturer’s instructions for each unit. This program will provide you with general guidelines that apply to all units. The equipment you will need to assemble includes: the glucose testing meter, a packet of test strips, an automatic lancing device, and facial tissue, alcohol wipes. The meter will have a display with blood sugar readings are shown, an on/off power button and a slot into which the Test Strips are inserted. In the back of the meter will be a compartment for batteries. The Automatic Lancing Device has three components: the body with a release button, lancet holder and cocking device, the removable end cap and a separate short lancet. The first step is to code the meter to match or calibrate the meter to the reactivity of the Test Strip. This is done by following the manufacturer’s instructions and matching a number on the meter’s display to a number on the Code Strip or on the test strip package. Coding is done: Whenever a new package of Test Strips is opened (Note: not al Continue reading >>

Gm782 Blood Glucose Meter User Manual Bionime Corporation

Gm782 Blood Glucose Meter User Manual Bionime Corporation

Trouble Viewing? See the or view the HTML Version or PDF in frame GM782BIONIME GmbHTramstrasse 16, 9442 BerneckSwitzerlandE-mail: [email protected] Date: September/2014BIONIME CORPORATIONNo. 100, Sec. 2, Daqing St., South Dist.,Taichung City 40242, TaiwanTel: +886 4 2369 2388Fax: +886 4 2261 7586http: //www.bionime.comE-mail: [email protected] Glucose Monitoring System GM782USERS MANUAL PrefacePrefaceTMThank you for selecting the Rightest Blood Glucose Monitoring System GM782 This manualprovides all the information you need to operate this product for accurate test results. Please readthis entire manual before you start any testing.For people living with diabetes, it is important to regularly monitor blood glucose levels to effectivelyTMreduce complications from the disease. The easy-to-use Rightest Blood Glucose MonitoringSystem GM782 provides accurate, reliable test results to help you better manage your diabetes.TMThe Rightest Blood Glucose Monitoring System GM782 is designed for in vitro diagnostic useonly (for self-testing by a single user outside the body). Testing requires only a small amount offresh capillary whole blood from either the fingertip, palm or forearm.TMThe Rightest Blood Glucose Monitoring System GM782 is a personal blood glucose monitoringsystem to be used for self-testing only. It is not recommended for multiple users.The testing result is calibrated to be plasma equivalent for test with fresh capillary, venous, arterialand neonatal whole blood samples. Capillary samples may be drawn from the fingertip, palm andforearm, and in the case of neonates, the heel. You may consult your healthcare professional forinstructions on how to use the system correctly. Our customer support staff is available to assistyou as well.A healt Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

People living with diabetes have to prick their fingers to check their blood sugar levels anywhere from one to seven times a day. But now, there’s a better way to monitor blood sugar. This week, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first at-home, needleless system for continuously monitoring glucose for people with diabetes. The system, called FreeStyle Libre Flash, and manufactured by the DC-based Abbott Laboratories, allows users to forgo finger-pricking for up to 10 days at a time. The Flash is essentially a small, circular plastic sensor that sits on top of the skin and detects blood sugar from a small wire that goes under the skin beneath the sensor. People can insert themselves using an applicator that works sort of like a rubber stamp. Once people have applied the sensor on their arms, they can wave a mobile device a little smaller than a smartphone in front of it to read glucose levels. It takes about 12 hours for the wire to become adjusted to the person’s body, but afterward the device takes continuous data that tracks blood sugar over time for over a week. Afterward, you peel the sensor off slowly, and apply a new one. Ideally, this would encourage people with diabetes to check their blood sugar more routinely, Jared Watkin, senior vice president of Abbott’s Diabetes Care unit, told Reuters. Often, people will forgo checking their sugar levels as often as they should because finger pricking can be such a nuisance. Right now it’s only marketed for adults, but the company hopes to receive approval for children under 18 as well. Abbott already has one needle-free blood sugar monitoring system available for the public called the FreeStyle Libre Pro. However, users have to make a special trip to the doctor’s office to have the wire placed und Continue reading >>

How To Dispose Of Needles, Lancets And Blood Strips Properly

How To Dispose Of Needles, Lancets And Blood Strips Properly

Some people with diabetes use supplies such as needles, lancets and blood strips which become medical waste. Learn the importance of disposing of them safely and properly. Find out the right type of containers to use for getting rid of sharps. Discover ways to dispose of medical waste in accordance with the law. Never share or reuse lancets, pen needles or syringes. Cleaning needles or lancets with alcohol will remove the protective coating that helps them slide into your skin and allows them to be so thin. After the first stick this coating is removed and they will become dull. A dull stick is more painful and offers less blood. You may then waste expensive strips. Insulin Needle Disposal Dispose of insulin needles when they are bent, dull or unsanitary. Do not bother to clip the needle. It could fly off, hurt you, someone or get lost. The entire syringe should be placed in an sealed container (no need to recap) that will not allow the needle to break through. Lancet Disposal Lancets used to collect small blood samples also need to be disposed of in a sanitary manner. Suitable containers for disposing of needles and lancets include a heavy plastic bottle with a screw cap or a metal or plastic box that closes securely. Never use glass or clear plastic. Puncture-proof containers should be sealed with heavy duty tape and labeled, “USED SHARPS. DO NOT RECYCLE” and put in the regular trash. There are also store bought containers that can be purchased and returned to the original company with the dirty needles. Look on diabetic product web sites for these specific containers. Test Strip Disposal Typically people with diabetes dispose of their blood strips in the same waste container as their sharps. Some keep them in a sealed bag and then place them in the sharps contain Continue reading >>

Jefferson Blood Glucose Monitoring -accu-chek Inform Ii

Jefferson Blood Glucose Monitoring -accu-chek Inform Ii

Learning Objectives At the conclusion, participants should be able to: Demonstrate how to perform a patient test on the Accu-chek Inform II glucose meter. Discuss how to perform Quality Control testing on the Accu-chek Inform II glucose meter. Recall how to properly handle glucose reagents. Discuss cleaning and troubleshooting of the meters. Glucose System Components Accu-Chek Inform II meter w/ rechargeable battery Base unit–charges battery, receives patient & reagent info from system Storage Case – conveniently stores and transports meter and supplies Quality Control – 2 vials of liquid quality control (“hi/loâ€) Testing Strips – small sample volume Glucose Meter Base Unit Return the Inform II meter to any base unit when finished with patient testing to charge the battery. A drained battery will take 1 hour to reach full charge. Docking the meter also synchronizes the information in the meter with the system (patient lists, operator lists, strips and controls). Test strips are stored in the tightly capped original container. There is a dessicant in the cap that keeps the strips from being exposed to humidity. The container must remain closed. Improperly stored Test Strips will produce inaccurate results and must be discarded. Test strips can be used until the expiration date printed on the vial. You may discard the code key that comes with every vial of strips. Both low and high level control must be tested every 24 hours. Each time QC is tested, the 24-hour clock resets. The Inform II meter is locked for patient testing until both low and high level QC PASS. QC should also be tested following these conditions: Patient test results are questionable. New test strip vial is opened. New control solutions are opened. The Inform II has Continue reading >>

Noninvasive Glucose Monitor

Noninvasive Glucose Monitor

Noninvasive glucose monitoring refers to the measurement of blood glucose levels (required by people with diabetes to prevent both chronic and acute complications from the disease) without drawing blood, puncturing the skin, or causing pain or trauma. The search for a successful technique began about 1975 and has continued to the present without a clinically or commercially viable product.[1] As of 1999, only one such product had been approved for sale by the FDA, based on a technique for electrically pulling glucose through intact skin, and it was withdrawn after a short time owing to poor performance and occasional damage to the skin of users.[2] Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in companies who have sought the solution to this long-standing problem. Approaches that have been tried include near infrared spectroscopy (measuring glucose through the skin using light of slightly longer wavelengths than the visible region),[3] transdermal measurement (attempting to pull glucose through the skin using either chemicals, electricity or ultrasound), measuring the amount that polarized light is rotated by glucose in the front chamber of the eye (containing the "aqueous humor"), and many others. A 2012 study reviewed ten technologies: bioimpedance spectroscopy, electromagnetic sensing, fluorescence technology, mid-infrared spectroscopy, near infrared spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, optical polarimetry, raman spectroscopy, reverse iontophoresis, and ultrasound technology, concluding with the observation that none of these had produced a commercially available, clinically reliable device and that therefore, much work remained to be done.[4] As of 2014, nonregarding the severe shortcomings mentioned above, at least one noninvasive glucose meter was bei Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

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