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Psychosocial Challenges When Living With Diabetes

Impact Of A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis On Mental Health, Quality Of Life, And Social Contacts: A Longitudinal Study

Impact Of A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis On Mental Health, Quality Of Life, And Social Contacts: A Longitudinal Study

Aims The aim was to examine whether a type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) diagnosis increases the odds of psychological distress, a worsening in overall quality of life, and a potential reduction in social contacts. Method Longitudinal data were obtained from the 45 and Up Study (baseline 2006–2008; 3.4±0.95 years follow-up time). Fixed effects logistic and negative binomial regression models were fitted on a complete case on outcome sample that did not report T2DM at baseline (N=26 344), adjusted for time-varying confounders. The key exposure was doctor-diagnosed T2DM at follow-up. Outcome variables examined included the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, self-rated quality of life, and four indicators of social contacts. Results A modest increase in the odds of psychological distress associated with T2DM diagnosis (OR=1.30) was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.75 to 2.25). A T2DM diagnosis was associated with a fivefold increase in the odds of a participant reporting that their quality of life had become significantly poorer (OR 5.49, 95% CI 1.26 to 23.88). T2DM diagnosis was also associated with a reduction in times spent with friends and family (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.95), contacts by telephone (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.02), attendance at social clubs or religious groups (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.91), and the number of people nearby but outside the home that participants felt they could rely on (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.98). Conclusions A T2DM diagnosis can have important impacts on quality of life and on social contacts, which may have negative impacts on mental health and T2DM management in the longer term. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which perm Continue reading >>

How Psychological Support Can Help People Living Withdiabetes

How Psychological Support Can Help People Living Withdiabetes

How psychological support can help people living withdiabetes Research Fellow, Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes Jane Speight is Foundation Director of The Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes, a partnership for better health between Diabetes Australia - Vic and Deakin University. She is also Director of Research at AHP Research, UK. She receives funding from Diabetes UK, Whitehorse Community Health, sanofi-aventis, Medtronic. She consults to and is a member of the Accu-Chek Advisory Board for Roche Diagnostics Australia. The Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes is a partnership for better health between Diabetes Australia - Vic and Deakin University. Jessica L. Browne receives funding from Whitehorse Community Health. She has consulted for Roche Diagnostics. The Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes is a partnership for better health between Diabetes Australia - Vic and Deakin University. Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons license. People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing emotional problems than the general population. sriram bala/Flickr Medical advances are important but we believe the key to living successfully with diabetes is something else entirely. Paying attention to the behavioural and psychological aspects of the condition is crucial to managing diabetes and preventing its complications. Once diagnosed, type 1 and type 2 diabetes are lifelong conditions. Each imposes a complex self-care regimen that can be difficult to sustain. Optimal self-care includes healthy eating, regular physical activity, taking medications as recommended, checking blood glucose levels, and attending medical appointments. New technologies such as insulin pump Continue reading >>

Managing Psychosocial Issues In A Family With Diabetes

Managing Psychosocial Issues In A Family With Diabetes

Managing Psychosocial Issues In a Family With Diabetes MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing January/February 2011, Volume :36 Number 1 , page 49 - 55 [Free] Join NursingCenter to get uninterrupted access to this Article Abstract: Managing diabetes in a child or teen requires constant attention and adjustment of insulin, carbohydrate intake, and activity level. Intensive diabetes management has the potential to improve diabetes outcomes; however, negotiating the many lifestyle accommodations essential to optimal diabetes control can place a significant burden on some children and families. Parenting a child with diabetes also involves a complex process of helping the child to achieve age-appropriate independence while assuring the child's safety in managing his or her diabetes. Each developmental stage brings new challenges to achieving the delicate balance between optimal diabetes control and age-appropriate independence in self-care management. Despite the laborious and intensive nature of diabetes treatment, an overarching goal of parenting a child with diabetes is to ensure that the family's quality of life is maintained and the child is able to participate in all academic and social activities that their peers enjoy. Although many families adapt and thrive, others struggle to make these adjustments. Working with families who are overwhelmed, encouraging them to identify and develop networks involving schools, extended family, community, and church groups can help them to increase available support. Helping families to access treatment when they are struggling can relieve further pain and improve management adherence and diabetes outcomes. Nurses are in a key position to evaluate the family's adaptive and coping skills and assist them to negotiate the Continue reading >>

Psychological Aspects Of Diabetes Care: Effecting Behavioral Change In Patients

Psychological Aspects Of Diabetes Care: Effecting Behavioral Change In Patients

Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients Boon-How Chew , Sazlina Shariff-Ghazali , and Aaron Fernandez Boon-How Chew, Sazlina Shariff-Ghazali, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Aaron Fernandez, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Author contributions: Chew BH, Shariff-Ghazali S and Fernandez A contributed to this paper. Correspondence to: Boon-How Chew, MD, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. [email protected] Telephone: +60-3-89472520 Fax: +60-3-89472328 Received 2014 Aug 27; Revised 2014 Nov 5; Accepted 2014 Nov 17. Copyright 2014 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patients adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. However, provision of psychosocial support is generally inadequate due to its challenging nature of needs and demands on the healthcare systems. This review article examines patients psychological aspects in general, elaborates in particular about emotion effects on health, and emotion in relation to other psycholo Continue reading >>

Psychological Aspects: An Introduction

Psychological Aspects: An Introduction

Diabetes mellitus presents to the physician as a metabolic or pharmacological problem, but adjustment to the diagnosis and its implications represents a major psychological and social challenge for the person affected, and will have a major influence upon the outcome of their disease. Diagnosis brings the realization that the condition is (usually, but not always) irreversible, typically associated with feelings of grief, anger and denial. The condition is often perceived as both isolating and stigmatizing, and may cause problems with self-image, personal relations and sometimes employment. The day to day demands of self care, including dietary restrictions, blood tests and injections, can weigh heavily, especially when associated with fears of hypoglycaemia or late complications. People with diabetes are also more likely to experience depression. Despite so many challenges, the great majority of people affected enjoy a good quality of life. Successful management of diabetes depends upon successful adjustment to the psychological and social challenges of the condition; conversely psychiatric and psychological disorders may result in inability to manage the condition effectively and result in poorer quality of life, worse outcomes and premature mortality. Recent psychological research has greatly increased our ability to identify psychological problems associated with diabetes and to make use of effective interventions. Textbooks published before the second half of the last century make little or no reference to the psychological or psychosocial aspects of diabetes. Psycho-analytic theories as to the causation of diabetes appeared around the mid-part of the century and are now considered frankly ludicrous. There was also discussion of the so-called "diabetic personality Continue reading >>

The American Diabetes Association Releases Psychosocial Recommendations For Medical Providers

The American Diabetes Association Releases Psychosocial Recommendations For Medical Providers

The American Diabetes Association Releases Psychosocial Recommendations for Medical Providers Guidelines encourage comprehensive, personalized mental health assessment and treatment as part of routine diabetes care Living with diabetes can be challenging on many levels, and complex environmental, social, behavioral and emotional issuesknown as psychosocial factorsinfluence the health of people living with the disease, as well as their ability to manage their diabetes. The American Diabetes Association has long addressed the psychosocial components of living with diabetes in its yearly Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, which covers all aspects of quality care for people with diabetes. The Association has now issued its first position statement that provides comprehensive and specific guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care based on factors including age, type of diabetes and family support system. The detailed recommendations are featured in "Psychosocial Care for People with Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association," to be published in the December 2016 issue of Diabetes Care , which will be available online Nov. 22, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. The guidelines focus on the most common psychological factors affecting people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including diabetes distress, depression, and anxiety and eating disorders, and emphasize that diabetes management is more successful when lifestyle and emotional status are an integral component of diabetes care. The psychosocial care position statement is based on current diabetes research and recommendations from the field of mental health, and it combines the expertise of the article's authors, from leading research institutions including the National Institutes of Health, Johns Ho Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Psychosocial Issues In Diabetes

Diabetes Mellitus - Psychosocial Issues In Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus - Psychosocial issues in diabetes Globally the incidence of diabetes is likely to exceed 250 million people by 2025 that is a measure of the scale of the problem this condition is likely to present in the future. It is evidence of how diabetes will be one of the foremost public health challenges facing the world in the decades ahead. Accordingly diabetes belongs at the top of the healthcare agenda but it has yet to be afforded that position. Throughout 2006, this Continuing Education module will deal with the causes and complications of diabetes mellitus, and the management of type 1 and type 2 in the various patient groups. This month Jennifer Clarke and Rita Forde outline the psychosocial implications of living with diabetes. Next month we will begin a focus on the complications of the condition and how they can be prevented. This will include footcare, and microvascular and macrovascular complications. The implications of a diagnosis of diabetes on the person and their family are immense. Many experience various emotions such as shock, anxiety, depression or guilt. Living with diabetes provides a daily challenge, as its management requires frequent and continuous effort from the person living with the condition.1 This incorporates such factors as home blood glucose monitoring, meal and exercise planning, and adherence medications. People living with diabetes need to be provided with information, reassurance and support in relation to all aspects of their condition. It is essential to assess the individuals ability to cope with and manage their diabetes effectively. This assessment involves careful observation, probing questions and attention to their feelings, thoughts and expectations. Health education involves more than just providing information Continue reading >>

Psychosocial Aspects Of Pregnant Women Living With Diabetes

Psychosocial Aspects Of Pregnant Women Living With Diabetes

Psychosocial aspects of pregnant women living with diabetes Amin Muhammad Gadit ( Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Memorial and McMaster Universities, Canada. ) A pregnant woman is exposed to a number of stress factors that can affect the pregnancy, maternal health and well-being of the foetus. Among these are the biological, social/environmental and psychological factors. The biological factors include medical condition of the pregnant woman, most notable is the gestational diabetes. The increased glucose levels can cause detrimental effect on the foetus and also cause maternal distress. This factor becomes more complicated if the woman is exposed to environmental stressors. The result is evident in the form of complications during pregnancy and psychological effects like depression and anxiety. Appropriate steps are important to address these issues in order to maintain the mother and prospective child\'s well-being. Keywords: Stress, Diabetes and mental health, Pregnancy and mental health, Gestational diabetes, Postpartum depression. Pregnancy is a crucial stage in the life of a woman as it involves a number of physiological changes in the body. There is a hormonal role that dominates the entire pregnancy cycle. Apart from this the psychological factors play a major role during this period. The stress about well-being of the developing child and anticipatory anxiety of the labour, delivery and possible complications of pregnancy pose a huge emotional burden on women. This anxiety is further compounded if there is a previous history of complications or risk factors identified or if the said pregnancy is the first one. At the same time, the social responsibilities and obligations are the crucial factors that can make a woman very vulnerable to psychological fragility Continue reading >>

Psychosocial Aspects In Diabetes Education And Management

Psychosocial Aspects In Diabetes Education And Management

Psychosocial Aspects in Diabetes Education and Management This activity is intended for physicians, pharmacists, diabetes educators, and other professionals conducting diabetes research or providing care for persons with diabetes. Improve strategies for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of diabetes. Reassess and modify current practice methods in order to enhance the care of persons with diabetes. Support the clinical practice of health professionals providing care for persons with diabetes. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Review the challenges of managing the pregnant diabetic patient. Discuss the rationale and implications of clinical studies to assess the effect of glycemic control on cardiovascular disease. Describe biochemical changes that occur in skeletal muscle during exercise in insulin resistance. Recognize the effect of psychosocial factors on the management of diabetes. Assistant Professor and Deputy Chief, Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Medical Education Collaborative, a nonprofit education organization, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Medical Education Collaborative designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 hour in Category 1 credit towards the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those hours of credit that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. This educational activity for 1.2 contact hours is provided by Medical Education Collaborative. Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP-12990 for 1.2 contact hours. Medical Education Collaborative, Inc. has Continue reading >>

Psychological Challenges For Children Living With Diabetes

Psychological Challenges For Children Living With Diabetes

Psychological Challenges for Children Living with Diabetes Our clinical psychologists, Drs. Korey Hood and Diana Naranjo, wrote an article for the International Diabetes Federation about the psychological challenges for children living with diabetes. Managing a chronic illness can be challenging, and developing effective coping strategies to overcome difficulties is essential for maintaining health, balance and happiness. Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic illnesses of childhood and requires a complex and demanding treatment regimen. While the large majority of childhood diabetes is type 1, there are increasing numbers of adolescents with type 2 diabetes who, requiring a similar treatment regimen, are subject to comparable risk factors for stress. Frequent administration of insulin, checking blood glucose levels, and treating high and low blood sugars are all a part of daily life with diabetes. Children with diabetes and their families must also coordinate these tasks with dietary intake and physical activity. Other aspects of diabetes management include attendance at regularly scheduled diabetes care appointments in clinics and hospitals, monitoring risk and treatment for medical complications and actively supporting a healthy immune system in order to prevent infections. These tasks are demanding and can be disruptive and stressful, illustrating how children living with diabetes and their families have a number of stresses that children living without diabetes do not experience. Continue reading >>

Psychosocial Concerns Among Patients With Diabetes Attending The Preanesthetic And Pain Clinic Bajwa Ss, Saroha R, Bajwa Sk - J Soc Health Diabetes

Psychosocial Concerns Among Patients With Diabetes Attending The Preanesthetic And Pain Clinic Bajwa Ss, Saroha R, Bajwa Sk - J Soc Health Diabetes

Diabetes is a global health problem that is expected to affect double the population by next decade as compared to those affected at present. In spite of the improved, efficacious and newer modalities available to achieve adequate control of the disease, psychosocial issues like depression and anxiety, which may present in the preanesthetic/pain clinics with varied symptomatology and commonly affects these patients, are often overlooked. The impact of these issues is enormous and usually understated because of the fact that health care providers are not aware of these issues and its effect on the overall management of diabetes. Therefore, it is important to recognize and address these issues for the optimal management of the disease. Of equal importance is the development of educational teaching modules for self-care management while imparting training to health care providers at the same time to recognize the susceptible individuals at the earliest. The need for having multi-disciplinary approach and implementation of the same in the day to day practice cannot be overemphasized. Keywords:Depression, diabetes, pain clinic, preanesthetic, psychosocial issues Bajwa SS, Saroha R, Bajwa SK. Psychosocial concerns among patients with diabetes attending the preanesthetic and pain clinic. J Soc Health Diabetes 2015;3:72-8 Bajwa SS, Saroha R, Bajwa SK. Psychosocial concerns among patients with diabetes attending the preanesthetic and pain clinic. J Soc Health Diabetes [serial online] 2015 [cited2018 Mar 29];3:72-8. Available from: Diabetes is a global health problem that is expected to affect 552 million people by 2030. [1] Although new, more efficacious and improved delivery systems to treat diabetes have been developed, majority of these patients do not achieve an optimal blo Continue reading >>

Psychological Aspects Related To Diabetes Mellitus

Psychological Aspects Related To Diabetes Mellitus

Psychological Aspects Related to Diabetes Mellitus 1Department of Psychiatry, Government Medical College and Hospital-32, Chandigarh 160030, India 2Department of Endocrinology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India 3Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045, USA 4Department of Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India Received 30 July 2015; Accepted 17 August 2015 Copyright 2016 Nitin Gupta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The prevalence of diabetes has shown an exponential worldwide rise in recent years [ 1 ]. Poor glycemic control results in long-term micro/macrovascular complications, and thus most diabetes organizations recommended good glycemic control (defined as A1c less than 7%) to prevent these complications. However, management of diabetes requires lifelong daily adherence to dietary and exercise plans, frequent blood glucose monitoring, and adherence to medications. This results in higher risk for reduced physical, emotional, and social well-being (in terms of quality of life) among people with diabetes. Over the decades, there has been a burgeoning research interest in the psychological aspects related to diabetes. Numerous evidences suggest the important role of psychosocial factors in diabetes self-management. Psychosocial problems can result in nonadherence to medications, poor quality of life, and lack of interest in managing disease resulting in poor glycemic control and long-term complications. In this regard Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Emotions

Diabetes And Emotions

Tweet For anyone with diabetes, experiencing negative emotions such as anger, frustration, hopelessness, fear, guilt and shame is very common. According to NICE (NICE, 2005) when a person is first diagnosed with diabetes, they will often go through similar psychological stages as that of bereavement: Higher HbA1c levels have been found to be associated with physical symptoms including hyperglycemic score, mood including levels of displeasure, depression, tension and fatigue and with worse general well-being. We look at how emotions can affect your life and diabetes management: The relative association varied between 1.02 and 1.36 for each percentage difference in HbA1c. The relation between HbA1c and some mood states have been found to be modified by neuroticism a patient who is less inclined to complain was associated with worse glyceamic control. [45] Mindfulness training has been shown to address depression, stress, anxiety, chronic pain all of which have been implemented with better glycaemia control, diabetes management and greater reported quality of life: More likely to suffer from depression According to the NHS people with diabetes are twice as likely to suffer with depression. Evidence presented by the National Diabetes Support Team indicate that 'recovery from depression is associated with reductions in HbA1c levels of between 0.5% and 1% suggesting that treating depression can not only improve quality of life but could also significantly reduce the risk of complications.' Some stressors may emerge after many weeks, months or years following diagnosis. Alternatively, there may be difficulties that arise upon initial diabetes diagnosis and continue without being resolved. These may include: A NHS Confederation briefing paper has highlighted the importance of i Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Psychological Problems And Emotional Support

Diabetes | Psychological Problems And Emotional Support

This page and associated links are designed to help to identify the emotional and psychological factors that play a role helping patients to manage diabetes. This is vital to consider as it allows for the patient to be seen as a whole person rather than just as a diabetic. In working with situational, cultural and lifespan issues with patients the key is to encourage empowerment and effective self-management of the whole of their lives. People with diabetes experience disproportionately high rates of psychological disorders, with depression and anxiety being the most common diagnoses. Some studies have suggested that approximately 40% of patients will have significantly elevated symptoms of depression. As regards anxiety similar figures have been recorded. Sticking to treatment regimes for the condition is a challenge This is determined by the extent to which a patient's behaviour coincides with health advice/recommendations Remember that where diabetes is concerned effective recommendations are likely to be complex and vary from patient to patient (this is due to the need to balance the various components of treatment with each other and life issues outside of the condition) As adherence to treatment and diabetic control is monitored it needs to be remembered that patients facing this challenge may well feel demoralised or depressed if outcomes are poor. It is vital to ensure that the patient does not feel blamed for these as this could potentially undermine their motivation to comply with all aspects of treatment. Remember it is not simply enough to educate and instruct the patient on how to manage their condition. Support and encouragement are vital if the patient is to feel empowered. In clinic the role of the professional should be one of facilitator rather than e Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.apa.org something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 104.197.17.229 on 2017-12-29 17:06:13 UTC. Trace: 80613e6c-40dc-4398-b09c-e4cf47fb1e2d via 7bcaee21-0f58-4c1e-b08a-f4cd97c75010 Continue reading >>

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