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Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes A Position Statement

Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association 1Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 2Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 3Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 4Yeshiva University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 6Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. More information is available at . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Complex environmental, social, behavioral, and emotional factors, known as psychosocial factors, influence living with diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, and achieving satisfactory medical outcomes and psychological well-being. Thus, individuals with diabetes and their families are challenged with complex, multifaceted issues when integrating diabetes care into daily life. To promote optimal medical outcomes and psychological well-being, patient-centered care is essential, defined as providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions ( 1 ). Practicing personalized, patient-centered psychosocial care requires that communications and interactions, problem identification, psychosocial screening, diagnostic evaluation, and intervention services take into account the context of the person with diabetes (PWD) and the values and preferences of the PWD. This article provides diabetes care providers with evidence Continue reading >>

Ada Releases Statement On Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Ada Releases Statement On Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

ADA releases statement on psychosocial care for people with diabetes Young-Hyman D, et al. Diabetes Care. 2016;doi:10.2337/dc16-2053. Recommendations for comprehensive and specific guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care-based factors for diabetes have recently been released in a position statement from the American Diabetes Association, according to a press release. Many psychosocial factors, including diabetes distress, depression, anxiety and eating disorders, affect people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes . This newest position statement emphasizes lifestyle management as well as addressing emotional status as integral parts of diabetes care. The recommendations include the following: Psychosocial care should be combined with collaborative, patient-centered medical care for all patients with diabetes; Assessment of symptoms of diabetes distress , depression, anxiety and disordered eating should be considered by health care providers; Patient performance of self-management behaviors should also be monitored by health care providers; Assessment of life circumstances that may affect physical and psychological health outcomes should be considered by health care providers; When psychosocial problems are identified they should be addressed immediately. Diabetes is unique in that it is a disease that is managed on a daily basis by the person who has diabetes, and this can lead to increased stress, Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, clinical health psychologist and vice president of the lifestyle management team at the ADA, said in a press release. People with diabetes have a greater risk of depression and anxiety, and while medical providers are trained to help people manage the medial aspects of their disease, they are not always taught to understand the impact that Continue reading >>

Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed By Ada In First Published Recommendations

Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed By Ada In First Published Recommendations

Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed by ADA in First Published Recommendations Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed by ADA in First Published Recommendations Evidence-based guidelines and clinician recommendations have been evaluated to create the first-of-its-kind statement focused on psychosocial care of people with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has released a position statement focused on aspects of psychosocial care in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, published in Diabetes Care.1 Based on current diabetes research and recommendations from mental and behavioral health professionals, these comprehensive guidelines are a first from the ADA. Deborah Young-Hyman, PhD, of the Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, and colleagues authored the position statement, which focuses on the most common psychological factors affecting people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, according to an ADA press release.2 Providing care for the mental and physical health of people with diabetes simultaneously will improve both outcomes, said Dr Young-Hyman in an email interview with Endocrinology Advisor. It is not expected that any one clinician can provide all services. The biggest challenge is capacity: the need for more mental health providers who are knowledgeable about living with and managing the disease. Dr Young-Hyman added that topics were chosen based on a number of criteria: The impact of psychosocial factors on people's ability to manage the disease (ie, carry out self-management behaviors essential to achieving good outcomes); the prevalence of comorbid psychological conditions in the [type 1 and type 2 diabetes] populations; and the state of the evidence and expert opinion regarding sta Continue reading >>

The Ada Issues Guidelines For Psychosocial Care In Diabetes

The Ada Issues Guidelines For Psychosocial Care In Diabetes

The ADA Issues Guidelines for Psychosocial Care in Diabetes The ADA released detailed guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care based on factors including age, type of diabetes, and family support system. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) released its first position statement that includes detailed guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care based on factors including age, type of diabetes, and family support system. The specific recommendations are available in "Psychosocial Care for People with Diabetes: A Position Statement of the America Diabetes Association" which will be published inDiabetes Care. The ADA's guidelines address the most common psychological factors affecting patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including diabetes distress, depression, anxiety and eating disorders . It emphasizes that diabetes management is more successful when lifestyle and emotional status are integrated into diabetes care. The position statement was based on diabetes research and recommendations combined with expertise of the study authors. Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, clinical health psychologist and vice president of the lifestyle management team at the ADA added, "People with diabetes have a greater risk of depression and anxiety , and while medical providers are trained to help people manage the medical aspects of their disease, they are not always taught to understand the impact that psychosocial factors have on people living with diabetes. Every person's needs are different, so individualized, patient-focused care that includes a mental health component should be a part of a comprehensive diabetes care plan for every person with diabetes." Cognitive Ability and Brain Gray Matter in Adolescents With Type 2 Diabetes Clinicians are encouraged to assess Continue reading >>

The American Diabetes Association Releases Psychosocial Recommendations For Medical Providers

The American Diabetes Association Releases Psychosocial Recommendations For Medical Providers

Guidelines encourage comprehensive, personalized mental health assessment and treatment as part of routine diabetes care Living with diabetes can be challenging on many levels, and complex environmental, social, behavioral and emotional issues—known as psychosocial factors—influence the health of people living with the disease, as well as their ability to manage their diabetes. The American Diabetes Association has long addressed the psychosocial components of living with diabetes in its yearly Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, which covers all aspects of quality care for people with diabetes. The Association has now issued its first position statement that provides comprehensive and specific guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care based on factors including age, type of diabetes, and family support system. The detailed recommendations are featured in “Psychosocial Care for People with Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association,” to be published yesterday in the December 2016 issue of Diabetes Care. The guidelines focus on the most common psychological factors affecting people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including diabetes distress, depression, and anxiety and eating disorders, and emphasize that diabetes management is more successful when lifestyle and emotional status are an integral component of diabetes care. The psychosocial care position statement is based on current diabetes research and recommendations from the field of mental health, and it combines the expertise of the article’s authors, from leading research institutions including the National Institutes of Health, Johns Hopkins Medical School, and Stanford University, among others. “Diabetes is unique in that it is a disease that is managed on a daily b Continue reading >>

Ada Issues Guidelines For Psychosocial Care In Diabetes

Ada Issues Guidelines For Psychosocial Care In Diabetes

ADA Issues Guidelines for Psychosocial Care in Diabetes The ADA's guidelines address the most common psychological factors The American Diabetes Association (ADA) released its first position statement that includes detailed guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care based on factors including age, type of diabetes, and family support system. The specific recommendations are available in "Psychosocial Care for People with Diabetes: A Position Statement of the America Diabetes Association" which will be published inDiabetes Care. The ADA's guidelines address the most common psychological factors affecting patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including diabetes distress, depression, anxiety and eating disorders. It emphasizes that diabetes management is more successful when lifestyle and emotional status are integrated into diabetes care. FDA Approves Soliqua 100/33 for Type 2 Diabetes The position statement was based on diabetes research and recommendations combined with expertise of the study authors. Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, clinical health psychologist and vice president of the lifestyle management team at the ADA added, "People with diabetes have a greater risk of depression and anxiety, and while medical providers are trained to help people manage the medical aspects of their disease, they are not always taught to understand the impact that psychosocial factors have on people living with diabetes. Every person's needs are different, so individualized, patient-focused care that includes a mental health component should be a part of a comprehensive diabetes care plan for every person with diabetes." Clinicians are encouraged to assess the patient's emotional health and life circumstances during the first visit, and to perform necessary evaluations the Continue reading >>

Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed By Ada In First Published Recommendations

Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed By Ada In First Published Recommendations

Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed by ADA in First Published Recommendations Evidence-based guidelines and clinician recommendations have been evaluated to create the first-of-its-kind statement focused on psychosocial care of people with diabetes. To combat depression and anxiety disorders , the authors recommend annual screening of all patients, particularly those with a history of anxiety or depression, either self-reported or documented in medical records. A directive to promptly refer all patients who meet clinical criteria for a diagnosis of depression to a mental or behavioral health professional received an A grade. Similarly, patients who meet criteria for an anxiety disorder should be referred for treatment. In both cases, assessment of self-management behaviors is recommended since both depression and anxiety can effect adherence. Patients who have anxiety secondary to episodes of severe hypoglycemia should be evaluated for hypoglycemia unawareness and treated using Blood Glucose Awareness Training or a similar, evidence-based intervention (A grade). Clinical and Subclinical Disordered Eating Diagnosable eating disorders are associated with high rates of comorbid psychiatric conditions in people with diabetes.10 Unhealthy behaviors including omitting insulin injections in order to lose weight and binge eating are common in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. 11-13 When assessing disordered eating behavior clinicians should examine patients' motivation and intentions to help determine if medication or treatment regimen changes are appropriate. To manage disordered eating behaviors, the authors gave B grades to 2 recommendations: consider evaluating treatment regimen when a patient presents with symptoms of either disordered eating or disrupted patterns of eati Continue reading >>

Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program Receives Nearly $1 Million Grant From Helmsley

Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program Receives Nearly $1 Million Grant From Helmsley

News, Events and Publications / Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program Receives Nearly $1 Million Grant from Helmsley Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program Receives Nearly $1 Million Grant from Helmsley 07.14.17 | Type 1 Diabetes | Helmsley Announcements More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, and people with diabetes face multiple, complex environmental, social, behavioral, and emotional issuesknown as psychosocial factorsthat influence their health and ability to manage the disease. In collaboration with the American Psychological Association (APA), the American Diabetes Associations (Association) first Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program , which was launched last month, has received an $839,000 grant from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust to support the program. Psychosocial challenges, including mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, diabetes distress, and disordered eating have frequently been overlooked in diabetes care. Having supported the integration of psychosocial care for people with diabetes in our position statement Psychosocial Care for People with Diabetes and our Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2017, we are excited to launch this program to increase the number of mental health providers knowledgeable about diabetes, said Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, vice president of lifestyle management at the Association. The lack of mental health providers experienced in caring for people with diabetes is a huge gap in our healthcare system. Thank you to the Helmsley Charitable Trust for supporting our efforts to increase the capacity of mental health providers with the important knowledge and expertise to provide care and support for people living with diabetes. The AssociationsStandards of Continue reading >>

Erratum. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2126-2140

Erratum. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2126-2140

Erratum. Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2126-2140 Meld u aan voor de maandelijkse nieuwsbrief Kleur. Gebruikt standaard de kalenderkleur Opmerkingen voor de recensent (optioneel) Weather data is currently not available for this location Deze website is primair bedoeld voor artsen 2018 diabetesgeneeskunde.nl - realisatie Diabetesgeneeskunde.nl rechtsgeldig vertegenwoordigd door Olio Communicatie b.v. (Kamer van Koophandel: 31044167), hierna te noemen Diabetesgeneeskunde.nl, verleent u hierbij toegang tot Diabetesgeneeskunde.nl ("de Website") en publiceert hier ter informatie teksten, afbeeldingen en andere materialen. Diabetesgeneeskunde.nl behoudt zich daarbij het recht voor op elk moment de inhoud aan te passen of onderdelen te verwijderen zonder daarover aan u mededeling te hoeven doen. De informatie op de Website is bedoeld als vrijblijvend en niet als een concreet aanbod om een overeenkomst te sluiten. Overeenkomsten worden alleen gesloten door aanvaarding van een als zodanig aangeduide offerte van de Website. Diabetesgeneeskunde.nl spant zich in om de inhoud van de Website zo vaak mogelijk te actualiseren en/of aan te vullen. Ondanks deze zorg en aandacht is het mogelijk dat inhoud onvolledig en/of onjuist is. De op de Website aangeboden materialen worden aangeboden zonder enige vorm van garantie of aanspraak op juistheid. Deze materialen kunnen op elk moment wijzigen zonder voorafgaande mededeling van Diabetesgeneeskunde.nl. In het bijzonder zijn alle prijzen op de Website onder voorbehoud van type- en programmeerfouten. Voor de gevolgen van dergelijke fouten wordt geen aansprakelijkheid aanvaard. Geen overeenkomst komt tot stand op basis van dergelijke fouten. Voor op d Continue reading >>

Response To Comments On Young-hyman Et Al. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Response To Comments On Young-hyman Et Al. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Response to Comments on Young-Hyman et al. Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association Sep 13, 2017 | posted by Kelsey Bennett | Article of the Week | ARTICLE: Response to Comments on Young-Hyman et al. Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association AUTHORS: Deborah Young-Hyman, Mary de Groot, Felicia Hill-Briggs , Jeffrey Gonzalez, Korey Hoodand Mark Peyrot JOURNAL: Diabetes Care. 2017 Sep;40(9):e131-e132. doi: 10.2337/dci16-0051. Thanks to Drs. Kalra, Balhara, Mezuk, Pouwer, and Campbell and Ms. Macdonald for their careful consideration ( 1 3 ) of the first American Diabetes Association (ADA) psychosocial guidelines Position Statement ( 4 ). Kalra and Balhara ( 1 ) note the overlaps and differences in the content of the ADA and Indian position statements, with particular emphasis on the cultural appropriateness and specificity of recommendations. Mezuk and Pouwer ( 2 ) question the need for routine screening for depression in persons with impaired glucose metabolism and undiagnosed diabetes based on meta-analytic results ( 5 ) and note the need to address disparities in diabetes burden and quality of care. They further suggest the need for action steps for practitioners once psychosocial issues are identified that impact health outcomes. These concerns are echoed by Macdonald and Campbell ( 3 ) when identifying that emphasis on compliance can cause blame to be placed on patients through misguided interpretation of the patient-centered paradigm. They suggest that this might be avoided through long-term care, by which they appear to mean the relationship formed through long-term follow-through by a consistent care provider. These authors identify social issu Continue reading >>

Ada Calls For Integrating Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Ada Calls For Integrating Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Newsroom Published on: November 28, 2016 ADA Calls for Integrating Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes The statement calls for delivery behavioral health services through a collaborative model when possible, both to share electronic health data and offer convenience and continuity for patients. The American Diabetes Association has called for fully integrating psychosocial care into diabetes treatment, ideally through a collaborative model that asks during the first visit after diagnosis whether a patient is experiencing depression or distress. The statement is published in the December issue of Diabetes Care. Healthcare providerswho may often be primary care physiciansshould revisit the mental health and cognitive status of persons with diabetes, when there is a change in disease, treatment, or life circumstance. The statement calls for bringing caregivers and family members into this process, and for monitoring a patients self-management skills as part of this evaluation. The statement calls on providers to form partnerships or alliances with behavioral health professionals who are well versed in the needs of those with diabetes. Ideally, these partners should be embedded in diabetes care settings. A joint location will allow sharing of records, including electronic health data, and maximize the effort to improve the patients disease management. Collaborative care, which calls for putting primary and behavioral healthcare under one roof, is not a new concept; it was pioneered by the University of Washington School of Medicine, and its success specifically for patients who had both diabetes and depression was presented in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2010. It has received increased attention in recent years due to the Affordable Care Act, which allowe Continue reading >>

Comment On Young-hyman Et Al. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2126-2140

Comment On Young-hyman Et Al. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2126-2140

Comment on Young-Hyman et al. Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2126-2140 Mortality from diabetes: age specific for the South East Weekly Versus Daily Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Inhibitor Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Society for Social Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting & European Congress of Epidemiology 2019 The Society for Social Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting (the UKs leading population health conference) takes place in Glasgow in 2018. It is being organised by colleagues from the University of Glasgow and the wider public health community in Glasgow. The SSM 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting is a three-day academic and professional conference with a mix of high quality, peer-reviewed oral presentations, posters and workshops and ample opportunity for networking. Two keynote lectures will be delivered by Professor Kate Hunt (the Cochrane Lecture) and Professor Mel Bartley (the Pemberton Lecture). Oral presentations run in parallel and are organised by topics, includingHealth Inequalities, Health Services Research, Lifecourse, Neighbourhoods & Communities, Mental Health & Wellbeing. The IPH Dublin staff team have moved to their new office in Vistatec House, 700 South Circular Road,Kilmainham, Dublin 8. The move took place on Wednesday 18th April 2018. Our phone number and email address will stay the same. Joint Action on Nutrition and Physical Activity (JANPA) The overall aim of this EU project was to contribute to halting the rise of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents by 2020. JANPA stands for JointAction onNutrition andPhysicalActivity. Considerable work has been done on the healthcare costs of adult obesity. Impacts of childh Continue reading >>

Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes Diabetes Care; 2016 Dec; Young-Hyman, et al The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has issued a position statement on psychosocial care for people with diabetes. These evidence-based guidelines offer recommendations based on commonly used clinical models, expert consensus, and tested interventions, taking into account available resources, practice patterns, and practitioner burden. Recommendations include: Psychosocial care should be integrated with collaborative, patient-centered medical care and provided to all people with diabetes, with the goals of optimizing health outcomes and health-related quality of life. Providers should consider an assessment of symptoms of diabetes distress, depression, anxiety, and disordered eating and of cognitive capacities using patient-appropriate standardized/validated tools at the initial visit, at periodic intervals, and when there is a change in disease, treatment, or life circumstance. Including caregivers and family members in this assessment is recommended. Consider monitoring patient performance of self-management behaviors as well as psychosocial factors impacting the persons self-management. Consider assessment of life circumstances that can affect physical and psychological health outcomes and their incorporation into intervention strategies. Addressing psychosocial problems upon identification is recommended. If an intervention cannot be initiated during the visit when the problem is identified, a follow-up visit or referral to a qualified behavioral health care provider may be scheduled during that visit. Young-Hyman D, de Groot M, Hill-Briggs F, Gonzalez JS, Hood K, Peyrot M. Psychosocial care for people with diabetes: A position statement of the American Diabetes Association. Continue reading >>

Response To Comment On Young-hyman Et Al. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2126-2140

Response To Comment On Young-hyman Et Al. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2126-2140

Response to Comment on Young-Hyman et al. Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2126-2140 Peer support in type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled trial in primary care with parallel economic and qualitative analyses: pilot study and protocol Response to Comment on Timmers et al. Resveratrol as Add-on Therapy in Subjects With Well-Controlled Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Diabetes Care 2016;39:2211-2217 Society for Social Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting & European Congress of Epidemiology 2019 The Society for Social Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting (the UKs leading population health conference) takes place in Glasgow in 2018. It is being organised by colleagues from the University of Glasgow and the wider public health community in Glasgow. The SSM 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting is a three-day academic and professional conference with a mix of high quality, peer-reviewed oral presentations, posters and workshops and ample opportunity for networking. Two keynote lectures will be delivered by Professor Kate Hunt (the Cochrane Lecture) and Professor Mel Bartley (the Pemberton Lecture). Oral presentations run in parallel and are organised by topics, includingHealth Inequalities, Health Services Research, Lifecourse, Neighbourhoods & Communities, Mental Health & Wellbeing. The IPH Dublin staff team have moved to their new office in Vistatec House, 700 South Circular Road,Kilmainham, Dublin 8. The move took place on Wednesday 18th April 2018. Our phone number and email address will stay the same. Joint Action on Nutrition and Physical Activity (JANPA) The overall aim of this EU project was to contribute to halting the rise of overweight and obesity in children and ado Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Archives - One Drop: Diabetes Management Made Simple

American Diabetes Association Archives - One Drop: Diabetes Management Made Simple

One Drop: Diabetes Management Made Simple More than Numbers: Dr. Mary de Groot on Diabetes Psychosocial Care Living with diabetes can be challenging. Stress, burnout, embarrassment, hopelessness, depression and other psychosocial factors affect diabetes, in addition to our ability to manage it. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has long recognized there are psychosocial aspects toliving with diabetes. Finally, in December 2016, the ADA issued its first comprehensive and specific standards forpsychosocial care. The article delves into the latestdiabetes research, mental health recommendations, andexpertise in the field. The authors are coming from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Johns Hopkins University, Stanford University, and otherreputable institutions. One of these authors is Dr. Mary de Groot, Associate Professor of Medicine and Psychology at Indiana University. Not only is she a licensed clinical psychologist, but she also has over 20 years of diabetes research and clinical experience. Shes leddiabetes professional organizations and beenon the editorial board of scientific journals. Funded by the NIH, her research examines the link betweendiabetes and depression, as well as howto treat depression inadults and diverse populations with diabetes. Tell me about the new ADAposition statement on psychosocial care for people with diabetes? This is the first comprehensive statement put forth by the ADA on the topic of psychosocial care of people with diabetes. It reflects over 40 years of psychosocial behavioral research and state-of-the-art clinical practice. Im honored to be a part of the writing team. Much credit goes to Dr. Deborah Young-Hyman, as well as all the others involved in our writing team and the ADA staff. Our writing team represents experti Continue reading >>

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