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Psychological Help For Diabetics

Diabetes - Child & Family Psychological Services, Pllc.

Diabetes - Child & Family Psychological Services, Pllc.

Child & Family Psychological Services, PLLC. Psychological Services for Pediatric Diabetes Patients Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that adversely impacts a persons ability to maintain appropriate blood glucose levels because of their inability to produce a sufficient amount of insulin. Diabetes presents both short and long term physical and psychological complications for children and families. The physical complications are often managed effectively under the care of a diabetes team, which consists of a variety of different health care disciplines. However, the long-term psychological complications are often inadequately addressed. Likewise, emotional factors are often important issues in a childs compliance with the demanding medical regimen. Psychologists, especially those trained in health or pediatric psychology, may play a vital role in the adjustment and on-going process of living with diabetes. There is extensive research on the psychological adjustment of children with diabetes and the impact of psychological interventions for these individuals. Psychological Issues that Children with Diabetes May Face Adjustment to Diabetes and the loss of the concept of a healthy child Anxiety about their future medical health Stress related to daily requirements/maintenance (e.g., injections and diet restrictions) Frustration and opposition to complying with medical regimen Goals of Interventions that Psychologists Provide Adherence to diabetes treatment regimen. This is the most common reason for psychological referral for children with Diabetes. Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health

How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health

WRITTEN BY: Mark Heyman, PhD, CDE How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health is part of our Mental Health series. Type 1 isn’t just about counting carbs, checking BGLs and administering insulin. The disease takes an emotional and psychological toll as well. Check out other clinical information and personal stories about Mental Health. When I tell people I am a psychologist who specializes in diabetes, they usually look confused. Most people think of diabetes as a physical condition and have never really thought about the mental aspects with living with the condition. Even some people with diabetes are surprised that there are organizations like CDMH that focus on diabetes and mental health. They know that living with diabetes is hard for them, but often they are surprised to hear that their concerns are actually (and unfortunately) quite common. What is it about diabetes that is so hard? I tend to think about diabetes and mental health issues very broadly. While some people with diabetes have a mental health condition (that may or may not be related to having diabetes), there are many others who struggle with issues that are very real, but which may not meet the (sometimes arbitrary) criteria for a mental health diagnosis. Psychology is the study of how situations, emotions and relationships in our lives interact and impact our behavior. I think that this definition provides us with a framework we can use to talk about how diabetes impacts mental health. Situation Diabetes is a self-managed condition. This means that it is the person with diabetes, not their doctor, who is responsible for taking care of him or herself on a daily basis. Diabetes involves making frequent, sometimes life or death decisions under sometimes stressful and physically uncomfortable circumstances Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Psychological Problems And Emotional Support

Diabetes | Psychological Problems And Emotional Support

This page and associated links are designed to help to identify the emotional and psychological factors that play a role helping patients to manage diabetes. This is vital to consider as it allows for the patient to be seen as a whole person rather than just as a diabetic. In working with situational, cultural and lifespan issues with patients the key is to encourage empowerment and effective self-management of the whole of their lives. People with diabetes experience disproportionately high rates of psychological disorders, with depression and anxiety being the most common diagnoses. Some studies have suggested that approximately 40% of patients will have significantly elevated symptoms of depression. As regards anxiety similar figures have been recorded. Sticking to treatment regimes for the condition is a challenge This is determined by the extent to which a patient's behaviour coincides with health advice/recommendations Remember that where diabetes is concerned effective recommendations are likely to be complex and vary from patient to patient (this is due to the need to balance the various components of treatment with each other and life issues outside of the condition) As adherence to treatment and diabetic control is monitored it needs to be remembered that patients facing this challenge may well feel demoralised or depressed if outcomes are poor. It is vital to ensure that the patient does not feel blamed for these as this could potentially undermine their motivation to comply with all aspects of treatment. Remember it is not simply enough to educate and instruct the patient on how to manage their condition. Support and encouragement are vital if the patient is to feel empowered. In clinic the role of the professional should be one of facilitator rather than e Continue reading >>

Should You Go To A Diabetes Psychologist?

Should You Go To A Diabetes Psychologist?

3 questions to ask yourself to see if therapy would benefit you. When I tell people I am a psychologist who specializes in diabetes (and who also happens to have Type 1 diabetes), they often are startled that there is such a specialty. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked “Is there really a need for that?” or “How hard can having diabetes really be?” It’s no secret to anyone who has diabetes that living with the condition can be really tough – and that the biggest challenges are often mental. Think about it for a minute. There are 8,760 hours in a year, and if you see your doctor every 3 months for a 15-minute appointment, that means that there are about 8,759 hours a year that you are on your own to manage your diabetes. You have to make important (sometimes life-or-death) decisions about your health multiple times a day, every day. sponsor For some people that responsibility can get so overwhelming, frustrating, and embarrassing that some people stop checking their blood sugar and taking insulin. Also, people with diabetes must deal with things like the fear of low blood sugar, how to handle complications, and combating a diabetes-related eating disorder – the list just goes on. When I tell mental health professionals about all this, they often tell me they had no idea how hard living with diabetes can be. If you have diabetes and you’re struggling, how do you know if you should get help? When someone asks me this, there a couple of things I encourage them to ask themselves: 1) Are your struggles affecting your ability to manage your diabetes? One of the most common reasons that people come to see me is that they are feeling frustrated and defeated by diabetes, and that these feelings make it really hard for them to get motivated to chec Continue reading >>

Common Issues Seen In Paediatric Diabetes Clinics, Psychological Formulations, And Related Approaches To Management

Common Issues Seen In Paediatric Diabetes Clinics, Psychological Formulations, And Related Approaches To Management

Common Issues Seen in Paediatric Diabetes Clinics, Psychological Formulations, and Related Approaches to Management 1Paediatric Endocrinology Department, Mafraq Hospital, P.O. Box 2951, Abu Dhabi, UAE 2Medical & Surgical Psychiatry, Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait 3Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Royal Childrens Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Correspondence should be addressed to Asma Deeb Received 3 September 2017; Revised 14 November 2017; Accepted 11 January 2018; Published 27 February 2018 Copyright 2018 Asma Deeb et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Diabetes is a chronic disease and its management is associated with multiple challenges. This is particularly the case in children and adolescents. Factors that contribute to difficulties in managing diabetes in youth include psychological characteristics, family dynamics, and social behavior. The purpose of this article is to highlight some psychological issues in children and adolescents with diabetes. We aim to present selected case scenarios encountered by health professionals and to provide tips on strategies for managing psychological aspect of diabetes. We tackle the psychological issues related to diabetes under four main categories: maladaptive disorders, eating disorders, family psychopathology, and family dysfunction. Psychotherapy and psychoanalysis are useful modalities in diabetes management. The psychological intervention is aimed at supporting patients and families to reach a balance between a normal family routine and a good glycemic control. We demonstrate unique requirements in coordinating care Continue reading >>

Depression And Mental Health

Depression And Mental Health

Depression is a very real condition and is becoming increasingly common in the general population; approximately one in four people will experience depression some time in their adult life. For people who live with diabetes, this figure is even higher. Up to 50% of people with diabetes are thought to also have a mental illness such as depression or anxiety. People with depression and diabetes may find it hard to maintain daily diabetes care Diabetes Australia and SANE have developed a booklet ‘The SANE Guide to Good Mental Health for people affected by diabetes’ which explains the relationship between diabetes and mental health and what you can do to look after yourself Depression is not just low mood but a serious illness. People with depression find it hard to do normal activities and function from day to day. Depression has serious effects on physical as well as mental health. Research shows that having diabetes more than doubles the risk of developing depression. Living with a chronic condition like diabetes, coping with biological and hormonal factors plus needing to manage the condition on a daily basis may increase the risk of depression. Depression can increase the likelihood of developing diabetes complications. People with depression may find it harder to deal with everyday tasks. Over time, managing diabetes (regular blood glucose testing, taking medication, following a healthy eating plan and regular physical activity) can take its toll. This may increase a person’s risk of depression, which may in turn lead to their usual diabetes care being neglected. A person may be depressed if for more than two weeks they have: Felt sad, down or miserable most of the time OR Lost interest or pleasure in most of their usual activities and Experienced symptoms in at Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Psychological Care

Diabetes And Psychological Care

People with diabetes experience disproportionately high rates of mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and eating disorders. All people with diabetes should have access to psychological treatment and support to reduce psychological distress and improve self-management. Use the following resources and tools to improve psychological care for people with diabetes. This reportpresents the 3DFD service at Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, a UK first model of care that integrates diabetes, psychological and social interventions for people with complex psychological needs. London's care pathway for diabetes: commissioning recommendations for psychological support, London Mental Health Strategic Clinical Network website (September 2014) This guidance provides recommendations to support commissioners to deliver accessible and effective psychological support for diabetes care pathways. It also provides a directory of good practice case studies from across England.This guidance provides recommendations to support commissioners to deliver accessible and effective psychological support for diabetes care pathways. It also provides a directory of good practice case studies from across England. Investing in emotional and psychological wellbeing for people with long-term conditions, NHS Confederation website (April 2012) This report provides service design and productivity improvement guidance for commissioners, clinicians and managers in primary care, secondary care and mental health. The guide also presents nine case studies where local areas have improved access to psychological support for people with diabetes.This report provides service design and productivity improvement guidance for commissioners, clinicians and managers in primary care, secondary care a Continue reading >>

Psychological Aspects Of Diabetes Management

Psychological Aspects Of Diabetes Management

Volume 34, Issue 2 , 1 February 2006, Pages 61-62 Psychological aspects of diabetes management Author links open overlay panel Frank JSnoeka T ChasSkinnerb Get rights and content Diabetes is a largely self-managed disease. Consequently, if the patient is unwilling or unable to self-manage his or her diabetes on a day-to-day basis, outcomes will be poor, regardless of how advanced the treatment technology is. Cognitive, emotional, behavioural and social factors have a vital role in diabetes management. More so, as co-morbid depression and other psychological problems are prevalent and negatively impact on well-being and metabolic outcomes. There is more to diabetes than glucose control; it requires a biopsychosocial approach. Motivational counselling and behaviour change programmes in type 2 diabetes have shown to be effective in improving adherence and warrant further dissemination in primary and secondary care. In type 1 diabetes, adolescents are at increased risk of coping difficulties and poor diabetes outcomes, and warrant special attention. For all age groups, monitoring of patients emotional well-being as an integral part of routine diabetes care is recommended. Discussion of quality-of-life issues in the context of clinical diabetes care in itself promotes adherence and patient satisfaction, and has proven to increase recognition of signs of emotional problems and diabetes burnout. Integrating psychology in diabetes management can help to effectively tailor care to the patients individual needs and improve outcomes. Continue reading >>

My Site - Chapter 18: Diabetes And Mental Health

My Site - Chapter 18: Diabetes And Mental Health

The experience of living with diabetes is often associated with concerns specific to the illness and can cause conditions, such as diabetes distress, psychological insulin resistance and the persistent fear of hypoglycemic episodes. A wide range of psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder, bipolar and related disorders, schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, eating disorders and stress-related disorders are more prevalent in people with diabetes compared to the general population. People living with diabetes and depressive disorders are at increased risk for earlier all-cause mortality compared to people living with diabetes without a history of depression. All individuals with diabetes should be regularly screened for the presence of diabetes distress, as well as symptoms of common psychiatric disorders. Compared to those with diabetes only, individuals with diabetes and mental health concerns have decreased participation in diabetes self-care, a decreased quality of life, increased functional impairment, increased risk of complications associated with diabetes, and increased health-care costs. Cognitive behaviour therapy, patient-centred approaches (e.g. motivational interviewing), stress management, coping skills training, family therapy and collaborative case management should be incorporated into primary care. Self-management skills, educational interventions that facilitate adaptation to diabetes, addressing co-occurring mental health issues, reducing diabetes-related distress, fear of hypoglycemia, and psychological insulin resistance are all helpful. Individuals taking psychiatric medications, particularly (but not limited to) atypical antipsychotics, benefit from regular screening of metaboli Continue reading >>

Psychological Support: The Missing Piece In Diabetes Care

Psychological Support: The Missing Piece In Diabetes Care

Psychological Support: The Missing Piece in Diabetes Care Psychological Support: The Missing Piece in Diabetes Care When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1999, I was both overwhelmed with information and desperate to find more information. It was easy to find depressing facts about the immediate dangers I would face, as well as the future complications I might suffer one day. When I looked for more, however, something about support or about real people living with type 1, there was nothing more than information about fundraising and camps for kids with diabetes. I was in the middle of graduate school at the time of my diagnosis, training to be a psychologist. In the years since, while learning to manage my diabetes, I have furthered my knowledge about how to help others with diabetes make changes and feel better. I learned quickly that the psychological aspect of diabetes care is mostly absent in the diabetes field. Patients had access to information, but they didnt have support. Eventually, I began to counsel people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Using cognitive behavioral therapy, I have tried to help my clients learn how to change the way they think, so that they can change the way they feel and behave. In recent years, by presenting at conferences and meetings, I have been grateful to be able to share ideas with other professionals in the diabetes field about counseling and supporting patients with diabetes. It seems that many nurse educators, dieticians and other health care professionals are interested in integrating the psychological aspect of diabetes care into their practices. In October 2012, I had the opportunity to present at the annual Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) conference. It was a wonderful chance to meet professionals from all acr Continue reading >>

How Psychological Support Can Help People Living Withdiabetes

How Psychological Support Can Help People Living Withdiabetes

How psychological support can help people living withdiabetes Research Fellow, Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes Jane Speight is Foundation Director of The Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes, a partnership for better health between Diabetes Australia - Vic and Deakin University. She is also Director of Research at AHP Research, UK. She receives funding from Diabetes UK, Whitehorse Community Health, sanofi-aventis, Medtronic. She consults to and is a member of the Accu-Chek Advisory Board for Roche Diagnostics Australia. The Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes is a partnership for better health between Diabetes Australia - Vic and Deakin University. Jessica L. Browne receives funding from Whitehorse Community Health. She has consulted for Roche Diagnostics. The Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes is a partnership for better health between Diabetes Australia - Vic and Deakin University. Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons license. People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing emotional problems than the general population. sriram bala/Flickr Medical advances are important but we believe the key to living successfully with diabetes is something else entirely. Paying attention to the behavioural and psychological aspects of the condition is crucial to managing diabetes and preventing its complications. Once diagnosed, type 1 and type 2 diabetes are lifelong conditions. Each imposes a complex self-care regimen that can be difficult to sustain. Optimal self-care includes healthy eating, regular physical activity, taking medications as recommended, checking blood glucose levels, and attending medical appointments. New technologies such as insulin pump Continue reading >>

Psychological Aspects Of Diabetes Care: Effecting Behavioral Change In Patients

Psychological Aspects Of Diabetes Care: Effecting Behavioral Change In Patients

Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients Boon-How Chew , Sazlina Shariff-Ghazali , and Aaron Fernandez Boon-How Chew, Sazlina Shariff-Ghazali, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Aaron Fernandez, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Author contributions: Chew BH, Shariff-Ghazali S and Fernandez A contributed to this paper. Correspondence to: Boon-How Chew, MD, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. [email protected] Telephone: +60-3-89472520 Fax: +60-3-89472328 Received 2014 Aug 27; Revised 2014 Nov 5; Accepted 2014 Nov 17. Copyright 2014 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patients adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. However, provision of psychosocial support is generally inadequate due to its challenging nature of needs and demands on the healthcare systems. This review article examines patients psychological aspects in general, elaborates in particular about emotion effects on health, and emotion in relation to other psycholo Continue reading >>

Barriers To Addressing Psychological Problems In Diabetes: Perspectives Ofdiabetologists On Routine Diabetes Consultations In Denmark

Barriers To Addressing Psychological Problems In Diabetes: Perspectives Ofdiabetologists On Routine Diabetes Consultations In Denmark

Received date: March 19, 2014; Accepted date: April 14, 2014; Published date: April 21, 2014 Citation: Johansen C, Torenholt R, Homme E, Wittrup M, Cleal B, et al. (2014) Barriers to Addressing Psychological Problems in Diabetes: Perspectives of Diabetologists on Routine Diabetes Consultations in Denmark. J Psychol Psychother 4: 141. doi:10.4172/2161-0487.1000141 Copyright: 2014 Johansen C, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background: Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of diabetes distress, depression , anxiety and eating disorders . Still, health professionals working with diabetes often fail to identify patients with serious psychological problems and to address psychological issues in general. Our aim was to explore diabetologists perceived barriers to addressing psychological issues in diabetes consultations. Methods: We conducted qualitative semi-structured individual interviews with 12 diabetologists working in specialist diabetes clinics in four different Danish hospitals. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by systematic meaning condensation. Results: We identified three main categories of barriers: 1) the structural organisation of diabetes consultations, e.g. sparse consultation time, extensive screen work, and missing referral possibilities; 2) the relation between patients and physicians, e.g. the perception of patient attitudes or patient personality; and 3) the individual diabetologist, e.g. acquired and inherent skills, and the physicians perceived area of responsibility. Psychological aspects of diabetes were generally Continue reading >>

Psychological Support And Counselling For Diabetes

Psychological Support And Counselling For Diabetes

Psychological Support and Counselling for Diabetes Psychological Support and Counselling for Diabetes Various forms of psychological support therapies are available Depression is the name given to the collection of physical and mental symptoms which arise in the presence of consistent low mood, unhealthy lifestyle and lack of motivation. People with diabetes are recognized by the NHS as having an increased risk of depression. As well as being a problem in itself, depression can also make diabetes management a more difficult task. Psychotherapy is the term for a range of different psychological therapies which include cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and cognitive analytic surgery (CAT). Psychotherapy is carried out by a trained mental health professional and all sessions are confidential. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy that can be helpful in overcoming negative thoughts and behaviour. The purpose of CBT is to change how we think about situations we find ourselves in and take positive actions. CBT recognises the past but the focus of the therapy is on the present. CBT can be particularly effective in people that are going through mild to moderate forms of depression. CBT will usually take the form of 6 to 8 one-to-one sessions with a trained counsellor. Alternative methods include group CBT and online CBT. Mindfulness based cognitive behavioural therapy (MBCT) Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is specifically developed to change the way people perceive their experience of life, rather than attending anxieties about the future or attaining a sense of identity through past events, Mindfulness teaches individuals to experience life on a moment by moment basis, avoiding judgment and desi Continue reading >>

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