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Protein Powder For Diabetics Type 1

Diabetes, Type 1

Diabetes, Type 1

What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that accounts for five to 10 percent of all cases of diabetes. It initially develops most often in children and young adults. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little or no insulin, the hormone needed to transport glucose into cells where it can be converted into energy. For this reason, if you have type 1 diabetes you will need to take insulin daily throughout your life. This form of diabetes has also been called juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes. What are the symptoms? Some of the symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst or irritability, can seem relatively benign, which is one of the reasons why diagnosis may be delayed. With type 1 diabetes, however, symptoms may come on suddenly. Early detection and treatment can decrease the odds of developing the acute complications that can stem from type 1 diabetes. Common symptoms of diabetes include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Increased fatigue Irritability Blurry vision If high blood sugar levels are not brought quickly under control via treatment, acute complications of type 1 diabetes include severe dehydration and development of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a metabolic state characterized by high concentrations of ketone bodies, which are byproducts of fatty acid breakdown, and can render the body’s tissues dangerously acidic. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, which in turn can lead to shock, coma, and even death. Longer term complications of type 1 diabetes – which are also common to those with type 2 diabetes – include: Eye damage: People with diabetes have a 40 percent higher than normal risk of developing glaucoma, increased pressure w Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Use Whey Protein Shakes?

Can Diabetics Use Whey Protein Shakes?

Whey protein will help you curb hunger, recover quickly from exercise and lose fat while maintaining muscle, according to the National Dairy Council. Whey is the liquid fraction of protein that is left when removing the curds, or the solids, from dairy. You can use whey protein if you have diabetes. In fact, it may help you gain better control over your blood sugar levels. Talk to your doctor before taking whey protein shakes, though, especially if you have diabetes, and don't stop taking medication that has been prescribed. Video of the Day Whey With Your Meal Test subjects with Type 2 diabetes showed a higher insulin response after eating a carbohydrate-containing meal that included whey protein powder than a similar meal without whey. Researchers mixed the powder into mashed potatoes. The increased insulin response was accompanied by lower post-meal blood sugar levels. This effect has the potential to delay the need for diabetes medications and has not been shown to cause hypoglycemia, reported the researchers in a 2005 issue of the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition." Researchers who published a study in 2014 in "Diabetologia" found similar results. Participants had 28 percent lower blood sugar levels and 96 percent higher insulin levels after a high-carbohydrate meal when they drank a whey protein shake beforehand. Look for a whey protein concentrate powder that contains no added sugars. Continue reading >>

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

Protein shakes and smoothies are all the rage these days. These popular pre- and post-workout drinks can include almost any ingredient under the sun, so if you have diabetes, it’s natural to wonder how they’ll affect your blood sugar. That said, there’s no reason to shy away from these drinks. There are countless diabetes-friendly recipes available online. Here, we round up our top eight protein shake and smoothie recipes for people with diabetes. Protein drinks 101 In general, protein drinks are made from protein powder and a liquid. Depending on your dietary needs, this liquid may be: water dairy milk nut milk rice milk seed milk Other protein add-ins include: cottage cheese yogurt nut butters raw nuts Sweeteners, fresh or frozen fruit, and fresh vegetables may also be added. No one food is off-limits if you have diabetes. Still, it’s important to limit refined carbohydrates that are more likely to spike your blood sugar. Eating fat with carbohydrates may help slow digestion. This can slow down the length of time it takes sugar to hit your bloodstream. Sources of fat that taste great in protein drinks include: nut butters raw nuts hemp seeds flaxseeds chia seeds avocados If possible, add fiber to your protein drink. It helps slow your body’s absorption of sugar. Oatmeal, ground flaxseed, chia seeds, and wheat bran are high in fiber and are protein-drink friendly. Some protein drink recipes call for maple syrup or Stevia. Maple syrup is high in sugar, but can be enjoyed sparingly. Stevia is a non-nutritive, no-calorie sweetener that won’t raise your blood sugar. When making shakes and smoothies, use the least amount of sweetener possible. Many pre-made protein shakes and smoothies are loaded with refined sugar. Your best bet is to make them at home where yo Continue reading >>

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

Whether you are looking to kick start your current weight loss plan or gain muscle in the gym, protein powders can very helpful. However, if you are diabetic you need to take extra care when choosing a protein powder. Ensuring that the supplement you choose fits with your current lifestyle and dietary needs is very important. Read on to find out exactly what the best protein powder for diabetics is. Who Are Protein Powders Designed For? There are a number of protein powders available, all of which are usually marketed for specific uses. For example, you can find protein for weight loss, powders for bulking up and gaining muscle and meal replacements. Traditionally though, most people tend to use protein powder as a post workout shake in order to aid their fitness goals. The Benefits Of Protein Powder Protein Powder Aids Weight Loss While Preserving Muscle If you are starting a serious weight loss program, especially if you’re attempting to improve or reverse the effects of type 2 diabetes, following a very low calorie diet (VLCD) is a good plan. Programs such as the blood sugar diet can be a great way to lose weight fast. One thing to be careful of is that restricting calories to this level can cause your body to break down muscle as you workout while it attempts to hold onto your fat stores. Drinking a protein shake post workout can help preserve muscle and burn more calories. Protein Powder Controls Hunger If you are trying your best to complete a weight loss program, constantly feeling hungry can be a huge obstacle. However, research has shown that drinking shakes with 50 grams of whey protein can reduce the hormones which tell the brain you’re hungry for up to four hours (source). Protein Powder Can Help You Beat Stress If you are feeling stressed, run down and Continue reading >>

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Whey protein is one of the two major proteins found in milk and dairy products. The other major protein in dairy products is casein—many people have sensitivities to casein, but few people seem to have any sensitivity to whey protein. When rennin, a protein that curdles milk, is added to milk and other dairy products, the curds (casein) and whey separate, just as they did in the old nursery rhyme. Whey protein is used for a number of purposes—it is used to maintain daily protein intakes, to build muscle mass, and to increase fat loss. Whey isn’t the only protein to increase fat loss—most proteins do, but most proteins aren’t available in an easily dissolved powder as whey is. Whey Protein, Insulin and Blood Sugar There are a number of properties of whey protein that appear to be useful in diabetes. [1] Whey protein is a good source of the amino acid L-cysteine. L-cysteine is used to synthesize glutathione, one of the body’s most important antioxidant. Oxidative stress—the buildup of damaging free radicals—is thought to be one of the underlying causes of insulin resistance and to be responsible for some of the complications of diabetes such as peripheral neuropathy, retinopathy and kidney damage. Whey protein, when added to a meal, also appears to increase insulin secretion and to decrease blood sugar after a meal. (Post-prandial blood glucose)[2] Whey protein can also decrease triglyceride levels in diabetics after meals. In a recent study, blood sugar levels were 28% lower in those who had whey protein along with their meal. Insulin levels were increased (doubled) and, importantly, the insulin response lasted longer. The study was small, only examining the responses of 15 individuals, but the design of the study made the results significant.[3] Whey has Continue reading >>

Superfoods For People With Type 1?

Superfoods For People With Type 1?

We take a look at 14 foods that may help you maintain blood sugar levels. Craig Idlebrook contributed to this article. Every adult with Type 1 knows, at least basically, how to count carbs and estimate the amount of insulin needed to cover those carbs. Fewer know how to seek out the foods that may help in maintaining good blood glucose levels. We’ve done some research to compile some food news for people with Type 1 diabetes. One word of caution, however: Most of the available research on food and diabetes has been done on mice and/or is focused on Type 2 diabetes. Your Shopping Cart Should be Filled with These 10 Things The American Diabetes Association has designated 10 invaluable foods for people with diabetes, based on glycemic index score and nutritional value: 1. Beans 2. Dark-green leafy vegetables 3. Citrus fruit 4. Sweet potatoes 5. Berries 6. Tomatoes 7. Fish high in Omega-3 fatty acids 8. Whole grains 9. Nuts 10. Milk and yogurt. Protein: The Jury’s Still Out The Paleo diet is all the rage now, and protein would seem like a natural choice of something to load up on in your diet, especially since there is evidence that the glucose from protein doesn’t make it into your bloodstream to mess with your blood sugar levels. However, for a long time now, scientists have warned that there is no body of evidence that suggests people with diabetes should consume more protein than people without diabetes. That being said, there is a pair of recent studies which suggest that protein may one day be suggested as a way to help control blood glucose levels: A study published in the journal Nature found that mice with the equivalent of diabetes achieved great glucose levels with daily injections of a protein called FGF1. Meanwhile, a 2014 Tel Aviv University study found Continue reading >>

Can Whey Protein Control Blood Sugar?

Can Whey Protein Control Blood Sugar?

Researchers from Israel believe people with diabetes could benefit from this protein-rich beverage. You have seen the advertisements—overly muscular body builders tauting the health benefits of one or more high-protein drinks. Although you may not be in training for the Mr. or Mrs. America contest, whey-protein drinks have been found to be helpful for people with type 2 diabetes. When consumed before breakfast, whey protein shakes can help prevent the blood sugar fluctuations that are common after meals, says Israeli researchers from Tel Aviv University. If left unchecked (continuous and long-term), these erratic variations in blood sugar can cause serious issues over time—worsening diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and damaging the retina of the eye. In fact, people with diabetes who drank the whey protein drink before breakfast saw a 28% drop in after-meal glucose scores, reported the authors of the study published in Diabetologia.1 The researchers evaluated the effectiveness of whey protein, a nutrient-rich byproduct from cheese production, against a mock product on 15 patients with well-controlled Type 2 diabetes. Some of the patients drank a protein drink containing 50 grams of whey protein, mixed with 250 milliliters of water, while the other patients consumed a placebo. They then ate a standard, high-glycemic-index breakfast as researchers monitored their glucose, insulin, and incretin levels over an entire 3-hour post-meal period. The patients were only taking a sulfonylurea, which increase insulin production from the pancreas, or metformin, which suppresses the liver from producing too much glucose. Interestingly, the glucose levels weren't the only signs of improvement; Insulin response more than doubled (105%) while C-peptide responses spiked by 43%, note Continue reading >>

Fitness & Nutrition With Type 1 Diabetes – A Guest Post By Dan

Fitness & Nutrition With Type 1 Diabetes – A Guest Post By Dan

Hi everyone! ProteinPow I’m really excited to share with you a great guest article by Dan from thehealthydiabetic.co.uk. This post came about after I approached Dan to ask him for advice regarding a friend of mine who was recently diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. My friend wanted to find out more about ways to keep fit and make sure his diet supported his active lifestyle as much as possible. Knowing that Protein Pow is full of sugar-free recipes, he asked me which ones would be best suited for him. I, in turn, asked Dan. Now, before I hand the mic over to Dan, I want to say one quick thing: People are every day are being diagnosed with not just Diabetes but all sorts of auto-immune conditions that affect their every day lives. All kinds of people. Fit people. Young and older people. People for whom it comes out of nowhere; people who don’t expect it. The first reaction to receiving such a diagnosis is shock, disbelief, and very often sadness. It’s disempowering, at the end of the day, you know? To be told, “you have X and will have X all your life.” In addition to, in most cases, being told that,”there’s nothing you can do about it”. Getting that kind of news sucks. It’s important though, I think, for people to do their best to gain some control back and realize that you know what? Your life WILL change, yes, but you don’t HAVE To let this define you or disempower you from leading an active, fun, and yes, healthy lifestyle! That’s a big reason why I love what Dan is doing with his website so much: he’s sharing his experience and showing people first-hand that, diagnosis or not, a fit, happy, and superhero-packed life is possible! That all you have to do is make some changes but at the end of the day you can lead a rich, full, and exciting life ju Continue reading >>

Fat, Protein Raise Blood Glucose In Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Fat, Protein Raise Blood Glucose In Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Current practice in calculating insulin dosing relies mainly on carbohydrate counting, with less emphasis on the impact of protein and fat on blood glucose. But new research suggests that protein and fat each affect blood glucose long after a meal, and that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their parts. The study involved 33 children and adolescents between ages 7 and 18 with type 1 diabetes. Their diabetes was well controlled through use of an insulin pump or multiple daily injections, and participants had an average A1c of 7.2%, noted study researcher Carmel E. Smart, APD, PhD, a Specialist Diabetes Dietitian at the John Hunter Children’s Hospital and Hunter Medical Research Institute, in Newcastle, New South Wales. Participants in the Australian study were given test breakfasts on four consecutive days. All breakfasts had 30 g of carbohydrates, but varying amounts of protein and fat. Additional protein came from powdered supplements and additional fat came from double cream (heavy cream) as part of the breakfast. The low-protein, low-fat (LP/LF), or control breakfast contained 5 g of protein and 4 g of fat; the high-protein, low-fat (HP/LF) breakfast contained 40 g of protein and 4 g of fat; the low-protein, high-fat (LP/HF) breakfast contained 5 g of protein and 35 g of fat; and the high-protein, high-fat (HP/HF) breakfast contained 40 g of protein and 35 g of fat. Participants received their usual individually standardized insulin dose for each breakfast. All participants wore a continuous glucose monitoring system, and the researchers recorded the participants’ postprandial blood glucose every 30 minutes for 5 hours after the meal. Study participants did not receive snacks or engage in physical activity for the 5 hours of glucose monitoring. Blo Continue reading >>

Which Protein Powder Is Best For Diabetics?

Which Protein Powder Is Best For Diabetics?

Diabetes is a horrible disease that is based on too much or too little glucose in the blood. Too high or too low and serious trouble is knocking at the door. It’s killed millions, make many more blind or loss of organs due to the damage from high blood sugar. Many within the medical profession state openly that blood sugar is not the problem, it’s just the symptom. The root of the issue is insulin resistance and it’s the #1 reason people gain or lose weight. Even the meds given for type II diabetes states on the insert that it causes weight gain. This means your goal as a diabetic is to never spike your insulin levels if possible. Enter the low carb diet. There have been many thousands of people who’ve reversed their diabetes by staying on an extremely strict low or no carb diet. This is where protein powder comes in. For the diabetic, having something that is both low carb (5 grams or less per serving) and low calorie is the holy grail of controlling and even reversing diabetes according to many experts. Protein powder may not be the crown of low carb, but it’s right up there sitting at the round table with other nobles. The good news is that most protein powders are low carb and sugars, and most of them can and will help you manage your diabetes if you are busy, on the go and don’t always have time for a full meal. How do you know how much to take? It’s simple. Using protein shakes as a meal replacement or pick me up is something you can do daily, just use common sense. You can also use it as a supplement in your baking and cooking to take a meal that is low in protein to one with much more appealing numbers. They even have special protein powders for women that are low carb, but are easier on the stomach and come from a variety of sources, both plant an Continue reading >>

Recommended Protein Shakes For Diabetics

Recommended Protein Shakes For Diabetics

Whether you're looking for something to aid in your weight-loss efforts or trying to find a meal replacement for those days you're too busy to eat a decent meal, a protein shake may work. When you have diabetes, you need to find a protein shake that fits your diet plan and doesn't cause your blood sugar to spike. These shakes do not provide all the nutrients your body needs and should not be your only source of nutrition. Consult your doctor or dietitian to discuss protein shake options that fit your lifestyle. Video of the Day Some protein shakes specifically designed for people with diabetes contain fiber and resistant starch, a starch naturally found in foods such as beans that your body cannot digest. The fiber and resistant starch -- usually maltodextrin in the ingredient list -- in the shakes aid in blood sugar control. Protein, carb and calorie content in these shakes vary depending on brand, ranging from 10 to 16 grams of protein, 6 to 27 grams of carbs and 180 to 200 calories. Shakes with Cornstarch Like fiber and resistant starch, uncooked cornstarch also aids in blood sugar control and is an ingredient in some protein shakes for people with diabetes. Uncooked cornstarch is a slow-digesting carb that causes a more gradual rise in blood sugar. When mixed with water, one protein shake mix that contains uncooked cornstarch provides 15 grams of protein, 12 grams of carbs and 110 calories. You can also make your own protein shake using whole foods. For example, you can blend a small banana, 1/2 cup of whole strawberries, 1/2 cup of soft tofu, 1 cup of nonfat milk and ice. This shake contains 15 grams of protein, 35 grams of carbs and 255 calories. Adding a little fat to your shake, such as peanut butter or flaxseeds, may help slow the digestion of your shake and he Continue reading >>

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot maintain normal levels of blood sugar, and blood sugar levels go too high. Blood sugars that are too high can cause symptoms such as dry mouth, increased thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and increased urination at night. High blood sugar levels over time can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. What people eat has a huge impact on their blood sugars. Carbohydrates found in foods cause blood sugar to go up. Foods that digest slower cause a slower rise in blood sugar, which is helpful for those with diabetes. But what about protein shakes? What is protein? The three essential macronutrients found in food are protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Protein helps to maintain, rebuild, and repair muscle. Protein is also a building block for the skin, nails, bones, and even blood. It makes up hormones, enzymes, and antibodies. Protein in foods has staying power because it digests slower than carbohydrate. Proteins do not raise blood sugar. Periods of growth, such as during infancy and pregnancy, need more protein. Protein needs are also raised for people with injuries, those who have had surgery, or active people. Most people, including those with diabetes, are looking for healthy options to grab on the go like protein shakes or bars. While it is important to rely on packaged food products as little as possible, it is smart to have some healthier options in mind when needed. The problem with protein shakes is that they often have lots of artificial ingredients and can have as much sugar as soda. Protein requirements The total amount of protein consumed in a day is important, but so is how that intake is spread out over the day. Many people will consume a small amount at breakfast, a moderate amount at lunch, and a lar Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Whey Protein Powder And Diabetes (type 1 & 2)

Everything You Need To Know About Whey Protein Powder And Diabetes (type 1 & 2)

WHAT YOU’RE ABOUT TO GET INTO? KEY POINTS Whey protein is the least important thing you need to worry about when it comes to building a better looking body. Certain types of whey protein are overpriced and aren’t worth the money. Whey protein will not ruin your kidneys or liver. Whey protein can affect your blood glucose levels and needs to be accounted for with the appropriate level of medication. Does whey protein live up to the hype for people with diabetes? Can I take whey protein safely if I have Diabetes? What about my kidneys? Am I wasting my money on another marketing scam? My health care professional says I do not need protein supplements, do they really know, or are they playing it safe? All my gym buddies take whey and getting results, but they don’t have diabetes, will it work for me? These are questions I hear all the time in my clinical Diabetes practice. Mainly by young men and women who are starting at the gym and want to build a great physique. They want to maximise their gym efforts by supplementing with whey protein. But they are concerned with safety, effect on blood glucose, and their finances. Sound familiar? There are some amazing articles online that have every last detail on whey protein. But I am guessing you do not want every last detail, right? If you want the most potent information, in an easy to understand format, that is specific to diabetes? This article is perfect for you. Not only that, it details the best practical strategies, taken straight from the pioneering Diabetic Muscle and Fitness Training Lab . These strategies are guaranteed to put you in control of your blood glucose level, and get the most out of whey protein. Oh, one more thing, I guess you want a diabetes specific guide for how to choose the right whey? Don’t wor Continue reading >>

Protein Powder For Diabetes

Protein Powder For Diabetes

**"Is taking whey protein powder good or bad for people with type 2 diabetes?" This was a correspondent’s recent question. I told him that this is such a good question that I would answer him here. Many people supplement their protein intake with a daily scoop or two of protein powder. Years ago I did that myself. We have a wide variety of types and brands of protein powder to chose from. Besides whey protein, we can get casein, soy, and egg white protein powder from many vendors.** **Some years ago I decided that using the most complete protein was the best idea. I discovered that egg protein powder was the most complete. That means it has the best balance of the nine essential amino acids that comprise protein. One way to check this is to consult NutritionData.com. This comprehensive nutrition website rates foods in many respects, including "protein quality." An amino acid score of 100 or more indicates a complete or high-quality protein, based on the recommendations of the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. NutritionData’s report for whole dried eggs awards it an amino acid score of 131, the highest such score I can find for any food. Its amino acid report for dried egg whites is also high, 125. Whey is also a high quality protein, scoring 102 for sweet dried whey and 109 for acid dried whey. But a separate NutritionData score for a food’s inflammation factor indicates that whey and whole dried egg is inflammatory, while dried egg whites are anti-inflammatory. So, for several years I would make an egg white protein powder drink every day. Until I realized that I was already getting too much protein in my diet. Like other men, I need just 56 grams of complete protein per day, according to the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medic Continue reading >>

Sports Nutrition And Type 1 Diabetes

Sports Nutrition And Type 1 Diabetes

Why is regular exercise good for diabetes? Hopefully, you're already aware of how exercise can have a positive impact on your diabetes management, as well as your general wellbeing. If not, here are just a few of the benefits of building regular exercise into your routine: a decrease in certain blood lipids – and an increase in beneficial cholesterol a decrease in blood pressure a positive effect on mood as a stress reliever, especially when performed in nature improvement in sleep quality ...and there's more From the point of view of day-to-day diabetes management, one of the most important benefits of exercise is that it increases insulin sensitivity. As a result, this translates to needing less insulin for the same amount of carbohydrate, and it can also dampen post-meal blood sugar spikes. The insulin sensitivity effect of aerobic exercise usually starts to decline within 1–2 days. Therefore, regular aerobic activity is essential to keeping the body in an insulin-sensitive state. At times, it can feel like a mental workout before you’ve even started exercising: deciding if and how much you need to eat before and during exercise, in addition to deciding what to do with insulin before, during and after exercise. We will be discussing the various factors to consider when making these decisions in order to help you manage your diabetes during exercise. Exercising almost daily (in contrast to exercising only twice a week) will ensure that you remain in a more insulin-sensitive state most of the time, instead of having varying levels of insulin sensitivity from one day to the next. This should translate to less variability in blood glucose and make it easier to manage your diabetes. The challenge of managing diabetes during exercise What are the challenges? In a per Continue reading >>

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