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Protein And Type 1 Diabetes

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

Protein And Energy Metabolism In Type 1 Diabetes

Protein And Energy Metabolism In Type 1 Diabetes

Protein and Energy Metabolism in Type 1 Diabetes We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Protein and Energy Metabolism in Type 1 Diabetes Profound metabolic changes occur in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus during insulin deprivation. These include an increase in basal energy expenditure and reduced mitochondrial function. In addition, protein metabolism is significantly affected during insulin deprivation. A greater increase in whole-body protein breakdown than protein synthesis occurs resulting in a net protein loss. During insulin deprivation the splanchnic bed has a net protein accretion which accounts for the total increase in whole-body protein synthesis while muscle is in a net catabolic state. Keywords: energy metabolism, insulin, mitochondria, protein synthesis, type 1 diabetes In the absence of insulin replacement type 1 diabetes is a catabolic condition with severe depletion of both energy stores and protein mass. Since most type 1 diabetic individuals are treated with insulin, a short period of insulin withdrawal in these individuals provides a model system to study the role of insulin in energy and protein metabolism. The causes of negative energy balance and protein catabolism have been extensively studied in people with type 1 diabetes and will be reviewed in this article. Profound changes in energy metabolism occur in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) during insulin deprivation in addition t Continue reading >>

Understanding Protein

Understanding Protein

Excess protein can mean excess calories and fat. It's best to get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry, fish, low-fat dairy products, and tofu. Protein is an essential part of your diet — and your body. But too much of a good thing can be bad for you. Most meats have fat as well as protein. So excess protein from animal sources can mean excess calories and fat — which means a greater chance at gaining weight. Proteins are found in: Poultry Fish and shellfish Eggs Dairy products, like cottage cheese and regular cheese Plant-based proteins, like beans, nuts and tofu The best advice about protein? Get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry and fish, low fat or nonfat dairy products, and vegetarian protein sources like tofu. How much protein do I need each day? For most people with diabetes, the amount of protein you need is the same as for people without diabetes. The National Institutes of Medicine recommend protein should typically provide 10-35% of total calories. The average intake for adults in the U.S. and Canada is about 15% of total calories. For most people, this amounts to 6 to 8 ounces of lean meat, poultry or fish daily. Think of a 3-ounce portion of protein as the size of a deck of playing cards. Aim for including roughly two of these in your diet daily. If you have kidney problems, you may need to limit how much protein you eat. Excess protein can make kidney damage worse. Your registered dietitian can help select the amount of protein that is right for you. Are All Proteins Created Equal? The source of protein is something else to consider – because some proteins are higher in calories and fats than others. Saturated fats and cholesterol are found in many protein-rich foods, contributing to bl Continue reading >>

How To Control Blood Sugar After A High-protein Meal

How To Control Blood Sugar After A High-protein Meal

What is the influence of dietary protein on post meal blood glucose? Does protein effect blood sugar after a meal? Is there additional math we need to do for improved control after meals? At present, those of us who use intensive insulin therapy understand how proper mealtime insulin dosing requires appropriate carbohydrate counting. This is based on the thought that carbohydrate is the main nutrient that influences our post meal blood sugar values. However, studies have demonstrated that protein and fat may also play a role in what happens to our post meal blood sugar. The impact of dietary protein on blood sugar has long been a topic of debate. Early research hypothesized that 100 g of ingested protein produced 50–80 g glucose. Later research showed, it was only ~ 10 g of glucose that showed up in the circulation following consumption of 50 g of protein (this is a serving of cooked meat about the size of a full outstretched woman’s hand). This equates to ~ 1 g of glucose produced from every 5 g of protein consumed. The results of the study below are consistent with this and, indicate consumption of ~ 75g and 100 g of protein ALONE may produce late rises in blood glucose which is similar to that from 15 and 20 g of glucose. This is relevant, given that 20 g of consumed glucose causes significant post meal excursions when insulin is NOT given. However, because the impact from protein (usually not covered by insulin) is delayed and sustained it shows a good reason we need consider dosing for protein dependent on portion consumed. Protein-rich meals may result in delaying the rise in blood glucose and produce a sustained high blood glucose. This indicates a need for more insulin for such meals or snacks as well as a new way to think about dosing insulin to offset the Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Whey Protein Powder And Diabetes (type 1 & 2)

Everything You Need To Know About Whey Protein Powder And Diabetes (type 1 & 2)

WHAT YOU’RE ABOUT TO GET INTO? KEY POINTS Whey protein is the least important thing you need to worry about when it comes to building a better looking body. Certain types of whey protein are overpriced and aren’t worth the money. Whey protein will not ruin your kidneys or liver. Whey protein can affect your blood glucose levels and needs to be accounted for with the appropriate level of medication. Does whey protein live up to the hype for people with diabetes? Can I take whey protein safely if I have Diabetes? What about my kidneys? Am I wasting my money on another marketing scam? My health care professional says I do not need protein supplements, do they really know, or are they playing it safe? All my gym buddies take whey and getting results, but they don’t have diabetes, will it work for me? These are questions I hear all the time in my clinical Diabetes practice. Mainly by young men and women who are starting at the gym and want to build a great physique. They want to maximise their gym efforts by supplementing with whey protein. But they are concerned with safety, effect on blood glucose, and their finances. Sound familiar? There are some amazing articles online that have every last detail on whey protein. But I am guessing you do not want every last detail, right? If you want the most potent information, in an easy to understand format, that is specific to diabetes? This article is perfect for you. Not only that, it details the best practical strategies, taken straight from the pioneering Diabetic Muscle and Fitness Training Lab . These strategies are guaranteed to put you in control of your blood glucose level, and get the most out of whey protein. Oh, one more thing, I guess you want a diabetes specific guide for how to choose the right whey? Don’t wor Continue reading >>

Protein And Diabetes

Protein And Diabetes

Tweet Protein is one of the three main energy providing macronutrients, along with carbohydrate and fat. It helps the body to grow new tissue, therefore helping to build muscle and repair damage to the body. Protein is also a constituent part of each cell of our bodies and makes up approximately a sixth of our body weight. Protein and blood glucose In addition to helping the body grow, protein can also be broken down by the body into glucose and used for energy (a process known as gluconeogenesis). Protein can be broken down into glucose by the body and the effects are more likely to be noticed if you are having meals with less carbohydrate. Protein is broken down into glucose less efficiently than carbohydrate and, as a result, any effects of protein on blood glucose levels tend to occur any where between a few hours and several hours after eating. People with type 1 diabetes, or type 2 diabetes on insulin, may need to bear the effects of protein in mind if having a largely protein based meal. It’s best to learn how your sugar levels react to such meals so that you can judge the right insulin requirements. How much protein should I be eating? The UK Food Standards Agency has a sliding scale for recommended protein intake, varying by age: 1 to 3 years: 15g 4 to 6 years: 20g 7 to 10 years: 28g 11 to 14 years: 42g 15 to 18 years: 55g 19 to 50 years: 55g Over 50 years: 53g Some diets, such as the Zone diet, advocate eating an amount of protein in proportion to your lean body mass (body weight minus body fat). Can protein be bad for you? A number of studies have found there to be correlations between intake of red meat and the development of type 2 diabetes and cancers (including lung cancer liver cancer and notably bowel cancer). The studies found that if people were con Continue reading >>

Fat And Protein Counting In Type 1 Diabetes

Fat And Protein Counting In Type 1 Diabetes

Fat and protein counting in type 1 diabetes Elaine Hibbert-Jones September 12, 2016 Vol 33.7 September 2016 The prevalence of obesity in type 1 diabetes is increasing and may be exacerbated by the use of an intensive insulin therapy regimen which improves glycaemia but is associated with weight increase. There are a plethora of diets and weight loss programmes to choose from, but balancing the insulin doses to achieve good glycaemic control is challenging. Mealtime insulin doses are traditionally calculated to match the amount of carbohydrate in the meal but evidence, particularly from continuous glucose monitoring, suggests that protein and fat can also have an effect on postprandial glycaemia. This article looks at the effect of fat and protein on the glycaemic response of a meal, alternative algorithms to calculate the bolus doses, their timing and delivery, and considers their effectiveness in supporting weight loss in overweight or obese individuals with type 1 diabetes. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK: 6.25% of the adult population. Ten percentof these have type 1 diabetes. In other words, there are over 300 000 adults and approximately 44 000 children under 19 years diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the UK.1 The majority of these people are treated with intensive insulin therapy (IIT), either a multiple daily injection (MDI) regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy. Both therapies require the patient to use variable insulin dosing, usually calculated to match the carbohydrate component of the meal. The DCCT/EDIC study showed that this approach improved overall glycaemic control compared to conventional insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes and reduced the risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction, Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

If you have type 1 diabetes , it is important to know how manycarbohydratesyou eat at a meal. This information helps you determine how much insulin you should take with your meal to maintain blood sugar (glucose) control. Carbohydrates are the main type of food that raises blood sugar. The starch, fruit and milk groups of the Food Group Pyramid for Diabetes are high in carbs. Foods in the Other Carbohydrates and Combination Food groups are also high in carbs. The vegetable group has a small amount of carbohydrates. The meat and fat groups have few or no carbs. The amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal will determine how high your blood sugar rises after the meal.The other two major nutrients, protein and fat ,also have an effect on blood glucose levels, though it is not as rapid or great as carbohydrates. Most people with diabetes can control their blood sugar by limiting carbohydrate servings to 2-4 per meal and 1-2 per snack. A delicate balance of carbohydrate intake, insulin, and physical activity is necessary for the best blood sugar (glucose) levels. Eating carbohydrates increases your blood sugar (glucose) level. Exercise tends to decrease it (although not always). If the three factors are not in balance, you can have wide swings in blood sugar (glucose) levels. If you havetype 1 diabetesand take a fixed dose of insulin, thecarbohydratecontent of your meals and snacks should be consistent from day to day. Weight and growth patterns can help determine if a child with type 1 diabetes is getting enough nutrition. Changes in eating habits and more physical activity help improve blood sugar (glucose) control. For children with diabetes, special occasions (like birthdays or Halloween) require additional planning because of the extra sweets. You may allow your ch Continue reading >>

Protein: The Missing Piece To The Diabetes Puzzle

Protein: The Missing Piece To The Diabetes Puzzle

Protein: The Missing Piece to the Diabetes Puzzle This information pertains to those with any type of diabetes. If you take insulin for diabetes, you might have heard that you can eat protein-rich foods and not need insulin to cover them. Also, if you have type 2 diabetes and do not use insulin, you may find that eating protein raises your blood sugar. Learning how to manage your blood sugar levels while getting adequate protein is important because protein intake is non-negotiable. As the US Department of Health and Human Services states, every cell in your body contains protein and is an essential part of your diet, as it is needed for cellular repair and division. Protein is also vital for growth and development in children, teens, as well as pregnant women. In this post, well explain how protein raises blood sugar, stimulates the production of insulin (or raises the need for insulin intake), and share tips on how to manage dietary protein if you have diabetes. WHY Do Blood Sugars Rise After Eating Protein? The molecular structure of the amino acid arginine. (Image Credit: Shutterstock) Proteins are composed of amino acid building blocks and are regarded as the workhorses of the cell. They serve numerous vital cellular functions, ranging from DNA replication to glucose metabolism. They stimulate the secretion of insulin and glucagon . Insulin lowers blood sugar and glucagon raises it. These two hormones work together in those without diabetes to keep their blood sugars tightly controlled at all times. In those with diabetes, glucagon is secreted but insulin isnt (or its insufficient) and this causes blood sugar to rise. Besides regulating our blood sugar levels, its important to know that insulin is required to build and maintain muscle. We know that body builders w Continue reading >>

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Diabetes SpectrumVolume 13 Number 3, 2000, Page 132 Marion J. Franz, MS, RD, LD, CDE In Brief People with diabetes are frequently given advice about protein that has no scientific basis. In addition, although weight is lost when individuals follow a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, there is no evidence that such diets are followed long-term or that there is less recidivism than with other low-calorie diets. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are in poor metabolic control may have increased protein requirements. However, the usual amount of protein consumed by people with diabetes adequately compensates for the increased protein catabolism. People with diabetes need adequate and accurate information about protein on which to base their food decisions. In the United States, ~16% of the average adult consumption of calories is from protein, and this has varied little from 1909 to the present.1 Protein intake is also fairly consistent across all ages from infancy to older age. A daily intake of 2,500 calories contributes ~100 g of protein—about twice what is needed to replace protein lost on a daily basis. Excess amino acids must be converted into other storage products or oxidized as fuel. Therefore, in theory, the excess ingested protein could, through the process of gluconeogenesis, produce glucose. This would mean that 100 g of protein could produce ~50 g of glucose. This has been the basis of the statement that if about half of ingested protein is converted to glucose, protein will have one-half the effect of carbohydrate on blood glucose levels. However, this belief has been challenged.2-4 Protein controversies exist either because research has not provided conclusive answers or because professionals are not aware of the research. This article will review Continue reading >>

Should Type 1 Diabetics Eat Carbs With Protein To Build More Muscle?

Should Type 1 Diabetics Eat Carbs With Protein To Build More Muscle?

Quick Summary Glucose and amino acids are both insulinogenic and have the potential to increase blood glucose. When glucose and amino acids are consumed together they require more insulin, than if consumed alone. Adequate medication must be given to accommodate the blood glucose increasing effects of these two macronutrients. Hyperglycaemia is highly detrimental to muscle protein synthesis. Besides focusing on carbs and protein alone, it’s important to see the bigger picture and consider all the other important factors that influence rate of muscle growth, of which there are many. What you’re in for? 600 Words Reading Time ~ 8 minutes SHOULD TYPE 1 DIABETICS EAT CARBS AND PROTEIN TOGETHER IN AN ATTEMPT TO BUILD MORE MUSCLE? Insulin is considered an anabolic (constructive) hormone. When protein is consumed the B-cells of the pancreas secrete insulin to shuttle amino acids into cells for anabolism. Insulin has been shown to play a role in the creation of new proteins across the body as well as inhibiting muscle protein breakdown 1. All the amino acids that make up protein impact insulin secretion differently. Certain amino acids are more potent at stimulating insulin secretion than others, especially leucine 2. This explains why whey protein, one of the richest sources of leucine, increases insulin secretion more than any other protein source 3. And, why the food insulin index considers the insulin requirement for foods as a whole (Inc. protein and fat) rather than just their carbohydrate content 4. The synergistic combo of glucose and amino acids signifies a high energy state (compared to one macro nutrient alone) leading to elevated insulin secretion. This is what promotes anabolism, glycogen storage and synthesis of fat tissue (if excess energy is available). Eatin Continue reading >>

People In The Know: High-protein Diets And Type 1 Diabetes

People In The Know: High-protein Diets And Type 1 Diabetes

Q: I keep hearing about popular high-protein/high-fat eating plans — could opting for more meats and cheeses over starchy snacks and sides in our son’s diet make blood sugar management easier? A: When parents encounter challenges with their child’s type 1 diabetes management, it can be tempting to look for quick fixes such as trendy high-protein/high-fat/low-carb or “paleolithic” diets that seem to promise so much. There are certainly times when a lower-carb snack can be helpful for keeping blood sugar within range, but if you’re considering steering your child toward a low-carb eating plan, you’re taking a risk that could lead to low blood sugar. One very important question to ask yourself is: Why do I think my child’s diet needs to be changed? If it’s because your child’s blood sugars are frequently out of range, get in touch with your child’s diabetes care team. Are numbers after meals and snacks problematic? Your registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator can review with you steps such as how to count carbohydrates in foods and how to properly calculate carb-to-insulin ratios. Carbohydrates are not the enemy! In your child’s diabetes management program, carbohydrates are important for many body functions, and insulin is what allows the carbohydrate to be properly utilized. The most important thing is to know how many carbohydrates should be consumed at meals and snacks and to adjust insulin when needed, and your diabetes care team can help you do that. The goal when choosing foods to include in a child’s diet is to meet his or her overall nutritional needs and instill healthy habits. Kids with type 1 can eat all the same foods as other children as long as carbohydrates in the foods are covered with insulin. We want all kids to mak Continue reading >>

Fat, Protein Raise Blood Glucose In Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Fat, Protein Raise Blood Glucose In Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Current practice in calculating insulin dosing relies mainly on carbohydrate counting, with less emphasis on the impact of protein and fat on blood glucose. But new research suggests that protein and fat each affect blood glucose long after a meal, and that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their parts. The study involved 33 children and adolescents between ages 7 and 18 with type 1 diabetes. Their diabetes was well controlled through use of an insulin pump or multiple daily injections, and participants had an average A1c of 7.2%, noted study researcher Carmel E. Smart, APD, PhD, a Specialist Diabetes Dietitian at the John Hunter Children’s Hospital and Hunter Medical Research Institute, in Newcastle, New South Wales. Participants in the Australian study were given test breakfasts on four consecutive days. All breakfasts had 30 g of carbohydrates, but varying amounts of protein and fat. Additional protein came from powdered supplements and additional fat came from double cream (heavy cream) as part of the breakfast. The low-protein, low-fat (LP/LF), or control breakfast contained 5 g of protein and 4 g of fat; the high-protein, low-fat (HP/LF) breakfast contained 40 g of protein and 4 g of fat; the low-protein, high-fat (LP/HF) breakfast contained 5 g of protein and 35 g of fat; and the high-protein, high-fat (HP/HF) breakfast contained 40 g of protein and 35 g of fat. Participants received their usual individually standardized insulin dose for each breakfast. All participants wore a continuous glucose monitoring system, and the researchers recorded the participants’ postprandial blood glucose every 30 minutes for 5 hours after the meal. Study participants did not receive snacks or engage in physical activity for the 5 hours of glucose monitoring. Blo Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Superfoods For People With Type 1?

Superfoods For People With Type 1?

We take a look at 14 foods that may help you maintain blood sugar levels. Craig Idlebrook contributed to this article. Every adult with Type 1 knows, at least basically, how to count carbs and estimate the amount of insulin needed to cover those carbs. Fewer know how to seek out the foods that may help in maintaining good blood glucose levels. We’ve done some research to compile some food news for people with Type 1 diabetes. One word of caution, however: Most of the available research on food and diabetes has been done on mice and/or is focused on Type 2 diabetes. Your Shopping Cart Should be Filled with These 10 Things The American Diabetes Association has designated 10 invaluable foods for people with diabetes, based on glycemic index score and nutritional value: 1. Beans 2. Dark-green leafy vegetables 3. Citrus fruit 4. Sweet potatoes 5. Berries 6. Tomatoes 7. Fish high in Omega-3 fatty acids 8. Whole grains 9. Nuts 10. Milk and yogurt. Protein: The Jury’s Still Out The Paleo diet is all the rage now, and protein would seem like a natural choice of something to load up on in your diet, especially since there is evidence that the glucose from protein doesn’t make it into your bloodstream to mess with your blood sugar levels. However, for a long time now, scientists have warned that there is no body of evidence that suggests people with diabetes should consume more protein than people without diabetes. That being said, there is a pair of recent studies which suggest that protein may one day be suggested as a way to help control blood glucose levels: A study published in the journal Nature found that mice with the equivalent of diabetes achieved great glucose levels with daily injections of a protein called FGF1. Meanwhile, a 2014 Tel Aviv University study found Continue reading >>

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