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Protein And Diabetes

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should a Person With Diabetes Eat? Protein itself does not have much of an effect on blood sugar levels, though the food the protein is in may. Typically, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes. There are, however, times when less protein isbetter. Protein is one of three essential macronutrients; the other twoare fat and carbohydrate. These are needed in large amounts to maintain health and vital functions. The body uses protein to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function and they help some additional physiological processes. As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 to 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein. This is the same amount suggested for a balanced non-diabetic diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates and the rest should come from fat. A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. It would be more accurate, however, to use the standard formula of 0.8 grams protein per kilogram of body weight. To do the kilogram conversion, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2. For instance, if you weigh 150 pounds, that is equal to 68 kilograms. Divide that by 0.8 and you get a protein goal of 85 grams. According to the USDA Dietary Guidelines , it is recommended to eat 5 1/2 ounces of protein-rich food each day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein When choosing proteins for a diabetic diet, the concern is more with the fats and carbohydrates that these foods Continue reading >>

Protein: The Missing Piece To The Diabetes Puzzle

Protein: The Missing Piece To The Diabetes Puzzle

Protein: The Missing Piece to the Diabetes Puzzle This information pertains to those with any type of diabetes. If you take insulin for diabetes, you might have heard that you can eat protein-rich foods and not need insulin to cover them. Also, if you have type 2 diabetes and do not use insulin, you may find that eating protein raises your blood sugar. Learning how to manage your blood sugar levels while getting adequate protein is important because protein intake is non-negotiable. As the US Department of Health and Human Services states, every cell in your body contains protein and is an essential part of your diet, as it is needed for cellular repair and division. Protein is also vital for growth and development in children, teens, as well as pregnant women. In this post, well explain how protein raises blood sugar, stimulates the production of insulin (or raises the need for insulin intake), and share tips on how to manage dietary protein if you have diabetes. WHY Do Blood Sugars Rise After Eating Protein? The molecular structure of the amino acid arginine. (Image Credit: Shutterstock) Proteins are composed of amino acid building blocks and are regarded as the workhorses of the cell. They serve numerous vital cellular functions, ranging from DNA replication to glucose metabolism. They stimulate the secretion of insulin and glucagon . Insulin lowers blood sugar and glucagon raises it. These two hormones work together in those without diabetes to keep their blood sugars tightly controlled at all times. In those with diabetes, glucagon is secreted but insulin isnt (or its insufficient) and this causes blood sugar to rise. Besides regulating our blood sugar levels, its important to know that insulin is required to build and maintain muscle. We know that body builders w Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Whey protein is one of the two major proteins found in milk and dairy products. The other major protein in dairy products is casein—many people have sensitivities to casein, but few people seem to have any sensitivity to whey protein. When rennin, a protein that curdles milk, is added to milk and other dairy products, the curds (casein) and whey separate, just as they did in the old nursery rhyme. Whey protein is used for a number of purposes—it is used to maintain daily protein intakes, to build muscle mass, and to increase fat loss. Whey isn’t the only protein to increase fat loss—most proteins do, but most proteins aren’t available in an easily dissolved powder as whey is. Whey Protein, Insulin and Blood Sugar There are a number of properties of whey protein that appear to be useful in diabetes. [1] Whey protein is a good source of the amino acid L-cysteine. L-cysteine is used to synthesize glutathione, one of the body’s most important antioxidant. Oxidative stress—the buildup of damaging free radicals—is thought to be one of the underlying causes of insulin resistance and to be responsible for some of the complications of diabetes such as peripheral neuropathy, retinopathy and kidney damage. Whey protein, when added to a meal, also appears to increase insulin secretion and to decrease blood sugar after a meal. (Post-prandial blood glucose)[2] Whey protein can also decrease triglyceride levels in diabetics after meals. In a recent study, blood sugar levels were 28% lower in those who had whey protein along with their meal. Insulin levels were increased (doubled) and, importantly, the insulin response lasted longer. The study was small, only examining the responses of 15 individuals, but the design of the study made the results significant.[3] Whey has Continue reading >>

Whey Protein May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Whey Protein May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

A large breakfast that includes whey protein may help control Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study presented at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society. Approximately 29 million people in the United States have Type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are living with prediabetes. Previous research has indicated that a large, high-protein breakfast, medium-sized lunch, and small dinner can help manage blood sugar levels and weight in people with Type 2 diabetes. To evaluate whether eating whey protein (a milk byproduct created during cheese production) at breakfast is more effective than eating other proteins for controlling blood sugar, HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months), weight, and hunger, the researchers recruited 48 overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes. The participants, who had an average age of 59, were randomly assigned to one of three diets containing the same amount of calories for 23 months. The only differences between the diets were in the amount and and type of proteins included at breakfast: The first group ate breakfasts containing 42 grams of 80% whey protein concentrate, such as whey-based shakes; the second group ate breakfasts containing 42 grams of non-whey proteins such as eggs, tuna, and soy; and the third group ate high-carb breakfasts with on 17 grams of protein. After 12 weeks, the whey protein group had lost an average of 16.7 pounds, compared to 13.4 pounds for those eating other proteins and 6.8 pounds for those eating primarily carbohydrate. Participants eating whey protein also felt less hungry throughout the day, had lower post-meal blood sugar spikes, and had larger decreases in HbA1c compared to those on the other two diets. “Recent reports have shown that whey protein Continue reading >>

High-protein Diet Can Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients Control Blood Sugar

High-protein Diet Can Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients Control Blood Sugar

A new clinical study suggests that diets high in protein, independent of caloric intake, improve metabolic health. High-protein diets in type 2 diabetes patients are controversial. Such diets have been linked to increased risk of heart disease and certain cancers. However, these diets have also been praised because they result in less carbohydrate intake and weight loss. A clinical study conducted by researchers in Germany studied the effects of two high-protein diets on patients. The diets were isocaloric, with the only difference being the source of protein: animal or plant (pulses). The study included 30 type 2 diabetes patients. The average age of participants was 65 years, the average BMI was 30.5, and average HbA1c was 7.0%. Both diets were 30% protein, 40% carbohydrates, and 30% fat. Length of the trial was 6 weeks. The study authors analyzed different metabolic and molecular parameters before and after the diet. Both subject groups saw an improvement in liver health with reductions AST, ALT, and GGT. The fat content of the liver and Hba1c levels also improved in all subjects. The animal protein diet reduced liver fat content by 43.6% whereas the plant diet reduced liver fat content by 37.1% (p < 0.001). Hba1c levels were reduced by 0.58% in the animal protein diet group and 0.41% in the plant diet group (p < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity, derived from hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, improved significantly only in the animal protein diet group with a change of 0.88 mg/kg BW/min (p < 0.05). The plant protein diet group saw an improvement in kidney function, which was not found in the animal protein diet group. The serum creatinine reduction was 7.79 micromols per liter (p < 0.01). Glomerular filtration rate also improved in the plant protein diet group. This fin Continue reading >>

The Role Of Dietary Proteins Among Persons With Diabetes

The Role Of Dietary Proteins Among Persons With Diabetes

The Role of Dietary Proteins among Persons with Diabetes We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. The Role of Dietary Proteins among Persons with Diabetes Jeannette M. Beasley, PhD, MPH, RD and Judith Wylie-Rosett, EdD Examining the role of dietary protein and establishing intake guidelines among individuals with diabetes is complex. The 2013 American Diabetes Association (ADA) standards of care recommend an individualized approach to decision making with regard to protein intake and dietary macronutrient composition. Needs may vary based on cardiometabolic risk factors and renal function. Among individuals with impaired renal function, the ADA recommends reducing protein intake to 0.81.0 g/kg per day in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to 0.8 g/kg per day in the later stages of CKD. Epidemiological studies suggest animal protein may increase risk of diabetes; however, few data are available to suggest how protein sources influence diabetes complications. Keywords: diabetes, dietary protein, amino acids Current protein recommendations are very wide (1035% of kilocalories) and were set by the difference after accounting for carbohydrate and fat needs 1 . The median protein intake in the United States is approximately 15% of kilocalories, varying little by age and gender 2 . This is well below the upper limit set by the Institute of Medicine of 35% of kilocalories from protein, but exceeds the Recommended Continue reading >>

Effect Of A High-protein, Low-carbohydrate Diet On Blood Glucose Control In People With Type 2 Diabetes

Effect Of A High-protein, Low-carbohydrate Diet On Blood Glucose Control In People With Type 2 Diabetes

There has been interest in the effect of various types and amounts of dietary carbohydrates and proteins on blood glucose. On the basis of our previous data, we designed a high-protein/low-carbohydrate, weight-maintaining, nonketogenic diet. Its effect on glucose control in people with untreated type 2 diabetes was determined. We refer to this as a low-biologically-available-glucose (LoBAG) diet. Eight men were studied using a randomized 5-week crossover design with a 5-week washout period. The carbohydrate:protein:fat ratio of the control diet was 55:15:30. The test diet ratio was 20:30:50. Plasma and urinary β-hydroxybutyrate were similar on both diets. The mean 24-h integrated serum glucose at the end of the control and LoBAG diets was 198 and 126 mg/dl, respectively. The percentage of glycohemoglobin was 9.8 ± 0.5 and 7.6 ± 0.3, respectively. It was still decreasing at the end of the LoBAG diet. Thus, the final calculated glycohemoglobin was estimated to be ∼6.3–5.4%. Serum insulin was decreased, and plasma glucagon was increased. Serum cholesterol was unchanged. Thus, a LoBAG diet ingested for 5 weeks dramatically reduced the circulating glucose concentration in people with untreated type 2 diabetes. Potentially, this could be a patient-empowering way to ameliorate hyperglycemia without pharmacological intervention. The long-term effects of such a diet remain to be determined. Data obtained in our laboratory (1–3) as well as from others (reviewed in 4) indicate that glucose that is absorbed after the digestion of glucose-containing foods is largely responsible for the rise in the circulating glucose concentration after ingestion of mixed meals. Dietary proteins, fats, and absorbed fructose and galactose resulting from the digestion of sucrose and lactose, Continue reading >>

High Protein Diet And Diabetes: Benefits And Side Effects

High Protein Diet And Diabetes: Benefits And Side Effects

High Protein Diet and Diabetes: Benefits and Side Effects Much buzz has been circulated online about diets with high protein. Diets rich in protein for type 2 diabetes patients are controversial. High protein diets have been associated with an increased risk of certain cancers and heart disease. However, the diet has been appreciated as it leads to weight loss and lowers carbohydrate intake. When excess protein is consumed, it is converted into glucose and is used as a source of fuel or stored as fat. People on a high-protein diet get about 55% of their energy from proteinous sources like milk, cheese, legumes, soy, eggs, chicken, and fish. Recommendations for protein range from about 10 to 25% of the total source of energy or about 1.2 gram of protein per kilogram each day, which is a moderate intake of protein. So, a person who weighs about 70% should eat 70 grams of steak daily because its run in exchanges. One protein exchange contains 8 grams of protein. One protein exchange equates to these food portions: Now lets look at the benefits of a high protein diet in diabetics: Reduced appetite A high protein / low carbohydrate diet causes ketosis. The body changes from burning carbohydrates or energy to burning fat, producing ketones that suppress the appetite. Protein take longer time to digest, makes you full for a longer period of time. Improvement of insulin and control of blood glucose. Loss of weight- high protein diet results in loss of weight and the reason is that individuals begin to consume less carbohydrate, which results in loss of water. Also, its important to keep in mind that people are different, and so these benefits may not be true for all individuals. Higher intake of fat from animal protein source (cholesterol and saturated fats), which results in Continue reading >>

A Diabetic Diet Needs The Right Proteins

A Diabetic Diet Needs The Right Proteins

Diabetes is such a complex condition that is still not well understood though there has been recent research that may shed new light on this disease that affects nearly 10 percent of Americans. From the little of what we do know, diabetes is a disease that arises from the pancreas inability to produce insulin (type 1) or insulin that is unable to perform the vital function of shuttling the sugars and carbohydrates consumed into the organs where they are used for fuel (type 2). Diabetes patients are also more prone to obesity, nerve damage and cardiovascular and kidney complications. Studies conducted at the University of Alabama at Birmingham discovered a rogue protein known as TXNIP, short for thioredoxin-interacting protein, and is found in both type 1 and 2 diabetes. What TXNIP does is that it releases free radicals that sends a message to the beta cells to self-destruct, for a lack of better word. Beta cells play a vital function in storing and releasing insulin, and the lack of beta cells or the production of ones that are defective have been linked to diabetes. While more research is needed to better understand the behavior of TXNIP, it is certainly a breakthrough that researchers hope to grasp a more solid understanding of in the future. For those with diabetes, scientific research doesnt mean anything unless something comes out of it that allows them to better manage their lifestyle. For the most part, diabetics need to follow a strict regimen consisting of daily physical activity and a healthy diet. With that being said, every diabetic patient is different, and there is no one-size-fits-all diet that is applicable for every diabetic. It is up to your doctor to determine the best dietary solution for your particular case. While diabetics need to eat a balanced Continue reading >>

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Diabetes SpectrumVolume 13 Number 3, 2000, Page 132 Marion J. Franz, MS, RD, LD, CDE In Brief People with diabetes are frequently given advice about protein that has no scientific basis. In addition, although weight is lost when individuals follow a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, there is no evidence that such diets are followed long-term or that there is less recidivism than with other low-calorie diets. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are in poor metabolic control may have increased protein requirements. However, the usual amount of protein consumed by people with diabetes adequately compensates for the increased protein catabolism. People with diabetes need adequate and accurate information about protein on which to base their food decisions. In the United States, ~16% of the average adult consumption of calories is from protein, and this has varied little from 1909 to the present.1 Protein intake is also fairly consistent across all ages from infancy to older age. A daily intake of 2,500 calories contributes ~100 g of protein—about twice what is needed to replace protein lost on a daily basis. Excess amino acids must be converted into other storage products or oxidized as fuel. Therefore, in theory, the excess ingested protein could, through the process of gluconeogenesis, produce glucose. This would mean that 100 g of protein could produce ~50 g of glucose. This has been the basis of the statement that if about half of ingested protein is converted to glucose, protein will have one-half the effect of carbohydrate on blood glucose levels. However, this belief has been challenged.2-4 Protein controversies exist either because research has not provided conclusive answers or because professionals are not aware of the research. This article will review Continue reading >>

Choosing Proteins For Diabetes-friendly Meals

Choosing Proteins For Diabetes-friendly Meals

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. Choosing Proteins for Diabetes-Friendly Meals Picking Proteins for a Healthy Diabetes Diet "Protein is important for maintaining muscle mass and the immune system, and when paired with a carbohydrate, it helps control the release of the carbohydrate," explains Jessica Crandall, RDN, CDE, a certified diabetes educator, general manager at Denver Wellness and Nutrition Center-Sodexo, and a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Protein also helps keep blood sugar levels stable and keeps you feeling full, which can be a big bonus when trying to shed a few pounds. Poultry, fish, nuts, beans, and soy are all excellent lean sources of protein that can help you create diabetes-friendly meals. So when you're on the hunt for a healthy protein to add to your plate, go ahead and think outside the red-meat section. Look for sources that are low in saturated fats yet rich in healthy fats like omega-3 fatty acids. Choose from the following wide variety of diabetes-friendly proteins to keep your menu fresh and your diet healthy. Opt for skinless chicken and turkey, says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of "Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week." Go for skinless ground turkey and chicken, too. "Often these meats are ground with the skin, so read labels carefully ," she says, recommending products that are at least 90 percent lean. To choose the leanest p Continue reading >>

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot maintain normal levels of blood sugar, and blood sugar levels go too high. Blood sugars that are too high can cause symptoms such as dry mouth, increased thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and increased urination at night. High blood sugar levels over time can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. What people eat has a huge impact on their blood sugars. Carbohydrates found in foods cause blood sugar to go up. Foods that digest slower cause a slower rise in blood sugar, which is helpful for those with diabetes. But what about protein shakes? What is protein? The three essential macronutrients found in food are protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Protein helps to maintain, rebuild, and repair muscle. Protein is also a building block for the skin, nails, bones, and even blood. It makes up hormones, enzymes, and antibodies. Protein in foods has staying power because it digests slower than carbohydrate. Proteins do not raise blood sugar. Periods of growth, such as during infancy and pregnancy, need more protein. Protein needs are also raised for people with injuries, those who have had surgery, or active people. Most people, including those with diabetes, are looking for healthy options to grab on the go like protein shakes or bars. While it is important to rely on packaged food products as little as possible, it is smart to have some healthier options in mind when needed. The problem with protein shakes is that they often have lots of artificial ingredients and can have as much sugar as soda. Protein requirements The total amount of protein consumed in a day is important, but so is how that intake is spread out over the day. Many people will consume a small amount at breakfast, a moderate amount at lunch, and a lar Continue reading >>

Too Much Protein?

Too Much Protein?

Within the diabetes community, it often seems that protein is the forgotten macronutrient — getting less attention than the other two, carbohydrate and fat. Carbohydrate is scrutinized, of course, because of its effect on blood glucose levels, while fat is often viewed as a source of unwanted calories — or, depending on your perspective, as a good source of energy that doesn’t raise your blood glucose level. To the extent that protein gets any attention, it’s generally thought of as a good or neutral dietary component. But a prominent doctor is warning against consuming too much of it. Last week, The New York Times published an opinion piece by Dean Ornish, MD, a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Ornish writes that high-protein animal foods such as meat and eggs are responsible for many of the ills plaguing Americans, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and Type 2 diabetes. He cites a study published last year that found a 400% increase in deaths related to cancer or Type 2 diabetes among participants who got 20% or more of their calories from animal protein. This increased risk of disease and death, he writes, may be due to a number of effects animal protein has on the body. It increases inflammation and an insulin-like growth hormone known as IGF-1, and red meat and eggs have been shown to contain or produce substances that clog arteries and lead to increased inflammation and cancer risk. Ornish maintains that the best diet is plant-based — filled with vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes — and low in animal protein, refined carbohydrates, and both saturated and trans fats. Such a diet has been shown, he writes, to reverse the progression of even severe coronary artery disease, reducing episodes o Continue reading >>

Understanding Protein

Understanding Protein

Excess protein can mean excess calories and fat. It's best to get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry, fish, low-fat dairy products, and tofu. Protein is an essential part of your diet — and your body. But too much of a good thing can be bad for you. Most meats have fat as well as protein. So excess protein from animal sources can mean excess calories and fat — which means a greater chance at gaining weight. Proteins are found in: Poultry Fish and shellfish Eggs Dairy products, like cottage cheese and regular cheese Plant-based proteins, like beans, nuts and tofu The best advice about protein? Get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry and fish, low fat or nonfat dairy products, and vegetarian protein sources like tofu. How much protein do I need each day? For most people with diabetes, the amount of protein you need is the same as for people without diabetes. The National Institutes of Medicine recommend protein should typically provide 10-35% of total calories. The average intake for adults in the U.S. and Canada is about 15% of total calories. For most people, this amounts to 6 to 8 ounces of lean meat, poultry or fish daily. Think of a 3-ounce portion of protein as the size of a deck of playing cards. Aim for including roughly two of these in your diet daily. If you have kidney problems, you may need to limit how much protein you eat. Excess protein can make kidney damage worse. Your registered dietitian can help select the amount of protein that is right for you. Are All Proteins Created Equal? The source of protein is something else to consider – because some proteins are higher in calories and fats than others. Saturated fats and cholesterol are found in many protein-rich foods, contributing to bl Continue reading >>

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