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Protein And Blood Sugar Balance

Why Do My Blood Sugars Rise After A High Protein Meal?

Why Do My Blood Sugars Rise After A High Protein Meal?

Complex issues often require more detail than you can pack into a Facebook post. One such area of confusion and controversy is gluconeogenesis and the impact of protein on blood sugar and ketosis. Some common questions that I see floating around the interwebs include: If you are managing diabetes, should you avoid protein because it can convert to glucose and “kick you out of ketosis”? If you’ve dropped the carbs and protein to manage your blood sugars, should you eat “fat to satiety” or continue to add more fats until you achieve “optimal ketosis” (i.e. blood ketone levels between 1.5 and 3.0mmol/L)? Then, if adding fat doesn’t get you into the “optimal ketosis zone”, do you need exogenous ketones to get your ketones up so you can start to lose weight? This article explores: the reason that some people may see an increase in their blood sugars and a decrease in their ketones after a high protein meal, what it means for their health, and what they can do to optimise the metabolic health. You’re probably aware that protein can be converted to glucose via a process in the body called gluconeogenesis. Gluconeogenesis is the process of converting another substrate (e.g. protein or fat[1]) to glucose. Gluco = glucose Neo = new Genesis = creation Gluconeogenesis = new glucose creation As shown in the table below, all but two of the amino acids (i.e. the building blocks of protein) can be converted to glucose. Five others can be converted to either glucose or ketones depending on the body’s requirements at the time. Once your body has used up the protein, it needs to build and repair muscle and make neurotransmitters, etc. any “excess protein” can be used to refill the small protein stores in the blood stream and replenish glycogen stores in the liv Continue reading >>

12 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar, A Holistic Nutritionist Explains

12 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar, A Holistic Nutritionist Explains

Do you regularly experience food cravings, mood swings, irritability or fatigue? If so, you may have a blood sugar imbalance. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1/3 of Americans are at imminent risk of becoming diabetic, and 90% of those at risk don’t even know it! Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial for optimal health and minimizes your risk of chronic conditions such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, Alzheimer’s and heart disease. Understanding Blood Sugar When you eat sugars and simple carbohydrates, these foods release glucose into the bloodstream very quickly, spiking your blood sugar. This spike forces the pancreas to produce excess insulin, which escorts the sugars out of the bloodstream and into the cells. Over time, when insulin levels are driven up over and over several times a day (due to too much sugar in the blood), the pancreas gets worn out and cells become resistant to accepting any more sugar. This excess sugar in the blood keeps blood sugar levels unnaturally high and insulin ends up storing it as fat. This can lead to visceral (abdominal) fat, weight gain and unhealthy cholesterol. As you can see, it’s not a good situation! And if left unchecked, a situation that can put you in the danger zone for diabetes and associated degenerative health concerns. But the good news is that it can be reversed through a healthy diet and lifestyle that balances your blood sugar. Below are some strategies to help you do just that! 12 Ways to Balance Blood Sugar 1. Learn about the glycemic index Foods low on the glycemic index release energy slowly into the bloodstream and cause only minor changes in blood sugar levels. These include animal protein, nuts and seeds, oils and fats, beans and lentils, whole g Continue reading >>

Protein: Metabolism And Effect On Blood Glucose Levels.

Protein: Metabolism And Effect On Blood Glucose Levels.

Abstract Insulin is required for carbohydrate, fat, and protein to be metabolized. With respect to carbohydrate from a clinical standpoint, the major determinate of the glycemic response is the total amount of carbohydrate ingested rather than the source of the carbohydrate. This fact is the basic principle of carbohydrate counting for meal planning. Fat has little, if any, effect on blood glucose levels, although a high fat intake does appear to contribute to insulin resistance. Protein has a minimal effect on blood glucose levels with adequate insulin. However, with insulin deficiency, gluconeogenesis proceeds rapidly and contributes to an elevated blood glucose level. With adequate insulin, the blood glucose response in persons with diabetes would be expected to be similar to the blood glucose response in persons without diabetes. The reason why protein does not increase blood glucose levels is unclear. Several possibilities might explain the response: a slow conversion of protein to glucose, less protein being converted to glucose and released than previously thought, glucose from protein being incorporated into hepatic glycogen stores but not increasing the rate of hepatic glucose release, or because the process of gluconeogenesis from protein occurs over a period of hours and glucose can be disposed of if presented for utilization slowly and evenly over a long time period. Continue reading >>

The Top 12 Foods To Balance Blood Sugar Levels

The Top 12 Foods To Balance Blood Sugar Levels

The Top 12 Foods to Balance Blood Sugar Levels As a society, we love our carbs, processed foods, and sugar. As a result, metabolic disorders are prominent and heart disease remains the number one killer in the US. This style of eating throws off our ability to have stable blood sugar levels which drives up inflammation, throws off hormones, and reduces our health and vitality. Taking steps to balance blood sugar is one of the first things I focus on when working with people to improve their health. This strategy alone has a tremendous impact on overall health and certain foods are fantastic for this purpose. Incorporating the foods and herbs from this article into your daily nutrition plan is a great place to start. Coconut is an all-around superfood and one of the best things to make a staple in your diet. Theres coconut oil , butter, flakes, milk, and even flour. Each of these provide unique benefits and uses for helping to balance blood sugar. First of all, coconut is an excellent source of healthy fats, particularly medium chain triglycerides (MCT). MCTs are types of fat that your body easily converts into a source of energy called ketones. When you burn ketones for energy instead of sugar, you naturally stabilize blood sugar and improve fat burning. These fats are found in most coconut products but are more prominent in coconut-based oil, butter, and milk. You could also try supplementing your diet with MCT oil which is a more potent extraction from coconut oil. Coconut also contains healthy fiber which is excellent for stabilizing blood sugar when combined with other sources of carbs ( 1 , 2 ). Coconut flour, butter (or manna), and coconut flakes are all excellent for this. Coconut flour is also extremely low in carbs, making it an excellent alternative for bakin Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

Blood Sugar Balance in Plain English Before we get started with tips to balance your blood sugar, I want to cover some basic blood sugar terms that I will be using in this discussion. Blood sugar/blood glucose – Glucose is the form of sugar that is in our bloodstream. Glucose is the body’s preferred source of fuel. Insulin – the pancreas secretes insulin, a hormone that shuttles glucose from the blood into body cells. It knocks on the cell and says, “Open up, I’ve got some glucose that I need to get out of the bloodstream so take it and use it for energy.” Insulin resistance – When we consume a large amount of refined carbs with very little fat and protein, our blood sugar spikes very high and the pancreas frantically overcompensates with insulin release. This overcompensation of insulin eventually causes insulin resistance, which leads to Type 2 Diabetes if poor dietary practices are continued. The good news, however, is that it can an be reversed through a healthy diet that balances your blood sugar. Glycogen – Glucose that doesn’t enter body cells is taken to the liver where it is converted to glycogen. This is a form of stored sugar that is broken down to stabilize low blood sugar levels between meals and during the night. It is healthful for the body store of glycogen, but stress and hormone dysfunction deplete our ability to store glycogen and this can contribute to blood sugar imbalance. Hyperglycemia – Hyperglycemia is another term for high blood sugar. It is normal to have a spike in blood sugar after a meal, but chronically high blood sugar causes severe health issues. Hypoglycemia – Hypoglycemia is low blood sugar. Glycogen, the sugar stored in the liver, is responsible for raising blood sugar in-between meals and should prevent hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Increase In Dietary Protein Improves The Blood Glucose Response In Persons With Type 2 Diabetes | The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition | Oxford Academic

Increase In Dietary Protein Improves The Blood Glucose Response In Persons With Type 2 Diabetes | The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition | Oxford Academic

Background: In single-meal studies, dietary protein does not result in an increase in glucose concentrations in persons with or without type 2 diabetes, even though the resulting amino acids can be used for gluconeogenesis. Objective: The metabolic effects of a high-protein diet were compared with those of the prototypical healthy (control) diet, which is currently recommended by several scientific organizations. Design: The metabolic effects of both diets, consumed for 5 wk each (separated by a 25-wk washout period), were studied in 12 subjects with untreated type 2 diabetes. The ratio of protein to carbohydrate to fat was 30:40:30 in the high-protein diet and 15:55:30 in the control diet. The subjects remained weight-stable during the study. Results: With the fasting glucose concentration used as a baseline from which to determine the area under the curve, the high-protein diet resulted in a 40% decrease in the mean 24-h integrated glucose area response. Glycated hemoglobin decreased 0.8% and 0.3% after 5 wk of the high-protein and control diets, respectively; the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The rate of change over time was also significantly greater after the high-protein diet than after the control diet (P < 0.001). Fasting triacylglycerol was significantly lower after the high-protein diet than after the control diet. Insulin, C-peptide, and free fatty acid concentrations were not significantly different after the 2 diets. Conclusion: A high-protein diet lowers blood glucose postprandially in persons with type 2 diabetes and improves overall glucose control. However, longer-term studies are necessary to determine the total magnitude of response, possible adverse effects, and the long-term acceptability of the diet. Dietary protein , diabetes , diet , in Continue reading >>

Whey Protein And Diabetes – Control Blood Sugar Spikes

Whey Protein And Diabetes – Control Blood Sugar Spikes

Diabetes has become one of the most serious health risks in the world today! According to the CDC, it's estimated that 29.1 million people in the U.S. suffer from diabetes. That's nearly 10% of the U.S. population! Roughly 1 in 3 adults (86 million people) suffers from pre-diabetes, and anywhere from 15 to 30% of those adults will develop full-on diabetes within 5 years. The mortality rate among diabetic adults is 50% higher than non-diabetics. The health complications of diabetes can be pretty terrifying to consider: heart disease, loss of limbs, strokes, kidney failure, and blindness. If you want to reduce your risk of diabetes, there are three things that will work: 1. Lose weight -- Obesity increases your risk of diabetes, as the excess body fat reduces your body's sensitivity to insulin. This causes your blood sugar levels to spike out of control. If the high blood sugar levels persist, over time it can lead to diabetes. By losing weight, you essentially increase insulin sensitivity, making it easier for your body to control blood sugar levels. 2. Do exercise -- Exercise helps to promote weight loss, but it also uses up the glucose (sugar in your blood). This helps to keep your blood sugar levels under control, preventing excessively high blood sugar that causes diabetes. Even just 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day is enough to drastically reduce your risk of diabetes. 3. Change your diet -- This is one of the most important lifestyle changes, and one of the easiest. A healthy morning breakfast diet includes a balance between fats, carbs, and protein, a reduction in sugar and salt intake, and plenty of raw foods. Almost any balanced, calorie-controlled diet will work wonders to control your blood sugar level and reduce your risk of diabetes. As you change up Continue reading >>

5 Foods To Balance Blood Sugar

5 Foods To Balance Blood Sugar

Good health is all about balance, especially when it comes to blood sugar. Eating the proper ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates at every meal keeps blood sugar stable, helps maintain physical and emotion balance, stops food cravings, and sustains energy levels. Balance your blood sugar by eating from the following list regularly, and don’t forget to keep your body hydrated with PLENTY of water each day. You can’t eat enough of these! Look for nutrient-dense options such as kale, spinach, and broccoli, which are loaded with fiber and calcium. Eat them at every meal! Wild caught fish, free-range beef, and eggs are excellent sources of blood stabilizing protein. Eat 4 to 6 ounces at least twice a day for blood sugar balance Grab a handful of almonds or walnuts for a healthy snack that keeps you satisfied and stable. Nuts are a great source of fiber, healthy fat, and protein. Lentils, garbanzo beans, and hummus are high in fiber, low in fat, and a good source of protein, keeping blood sugar nice and steady. Be sure to soak beans overnight, which will ease digestion. To balance blood sugar, avoid foods that spike insulin levels, increase inflammation in the body, and lead to weight gain. For optimal health, steer clear of these next two foods... No longer limited to candy, refined sugar is added to everyday items such as salad dressing, yogurt, fruit juice, and prepackaged foods. Read food labels carefully and focus on fresh, whole foods to avoid unnecessary spikes in blood sugar. Continue reading >>

How Do Fats & Proteins Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

How Do Fats & Proteins Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

After you eat, your blood sugar levels increase and trigger the release of insulin, an important hormone in managing how your body uses glucose. Different types of nutrients affect blood sugar differently, and maintaining an appropriate intake of carbohydrates, proteins and fats will help control blood sugar levels and prevent or manage metabolic diseases like Type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrates, proteins and fats are the three macronutrients your body needs. Carbohydrates are primarily used for energy, while proteins are important for rebuilding tissue, and fats are important for maintaining cell membranes and facilitating vitamin absorption, among other functions. Carbohydrates have the most significant impact on blood sugar, so carbohydrate intake should be monitored closely by individuals with or at risk for Type 2 diabetes. Protein's Effects on Blood Sugar Compared to carbohydrates, protein keeps blood sugar levels steady. When consumed alone, protein does not generate a rise in blood sugar. According to a study published in 2003 in “American Society for Clinical Nutrition,” individuals with Type 2 diabetes who maintained a 30:40:30 intake ratio of protein to carbohydrates to fat showed a 40 percent lower blood sugar response than those who maintained a 15:55:30 intake ratio. This suggests that protein is neutral food for blood sugar levels and can replace at least some carbohydrates to yield a better overall blood sugar response. Fat's Effects on Blood Sugar Like protein, fat has significantly less impact on blood sugar than carbohydrates. When consumed alone, ingested fats have no bearing on the concentration of circulating blood sugar. Replacing some carbohydrate content with healthy dietary fats could therefore result in steadier overall levels of blood sugar. M Continue reading >>

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar In Diabetics?

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar In Diabetics?

Approximately one out of every 10 people in the U.S. has diabetes, a disease that affects how the body uses sugar, also known as glucose. Careful blood glucose control is essential to manage this condition and reduce the risk of complications such as nerve damage, blindness and heart disease. Adding more protein-rich foods to your diet -- and few carbohydrates and fats -- may help balance blood glucose levels. Video of the Day Improved Blood Glucose Balance A 2003 study published in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" concluded that a high-protein diet helped lower blood glucose levels after eating and improved overall blood glucose control in people with Type 2 diabetes. Test individuals on the high-protein diet had a ratio of protein to carbohydrates to fat of 30:40:30, compared to 15:55:30 for the control group. Both groups consumed the diet for five weeks. Despite the positive results from this research, longer studies are needed to gauge the long-term effects and any possible adverse effects of a high-protein diet on diabetics. Direct Effects of Protein Many protein-rich foods contain minimal or no carbohydrates and only have a small effect on blood sugar levels. These include lean meats, chicken, turkey, fish and eggs. However, you add extra carbohydrates if the protein food is battered, crusted or marinated or you are eating it with sauce. University of Michigan Medicine recommends that a meal should contain a half portion of raw or cooked vegetables such as green beans and squash, a quarter portion of carbohydrate such as whole-grain pasta or brown rice, and a quarter portion -- 3 ounces -- of protein such as lean meat or fish. Protein-rich foods such as legumes and milk and dairy products also contain carbohydrates, which will raise your blood glucose Continue reading >>

Animal Vs. Plant Based Protein To Balance Blood Sugar

Animal Vs. Plant Based Protein To Balance Blood Sugar

In a new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition, scientists compared animal proteins to plant proteins and evaluated their impact on type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. While high-protein diets, high-animal protein diets and a diet of processed red meats have been linked to increased diabetes risk in many studies, this was the first time an animal-based protein diet was compared to a plant-based protein diet. The Study In the study, the diets of 2,332 men between the ages of 42 and 60 who did not have T2D were followed from 1984 to 1989. After 19 years, a follow-up evaluation was conducted, and 432 men had been diagnosed with T2D. After comparing the diets of the men, the researchers found that a diet of plant-based proteins was linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and an animal-based protein diet was associated with a higher risk of getting T2D. (1) The men who ate the highest amount of plant-based protein had a 35% REDUCTION in type 2 diabetes risk compared to the men who consumed the highest amount of animal protein. One might assume that the men who ate plant-based proteins might, in general, have a healthier lifestyle compared to the meat-eating men, but lifestyle did not fully explain the results. Using the numbers from this study, if you were to replace just 5 grams of animal protein with 5 grams of a plant-based protein, you would reduce your risk of T2D by 18%. Plant-based proteins were also associated with lower fasting glucose levels during the study. (1) Note: One exception to the rule that animal proteins may increase the risk of T2D was eggs. Egg protein was actually associated with a lower risk of T2D. While a higher animal protein diet was associated with an increased risk of T2D, the researchers discovered that it was not the animal pro Continue reading >>

How To Control Blood Sugar After A High-protein Meal

How To Control Blood Sugar After A High-protein Meal

What is the influence of dietary protein on post meal blood glucose? Does protein effect blood sugar after a meal? Is there additional math we need to do for improved control after meals? At present, those of us who use intensive insulin therapy understand how proper mealtime insulin dosing requires appropriate carbohydrate counting. This is based on the thought that carbohydrate is the main nutrient that influences our post meal blood sugar values. However, studies have demonstrated that protein and fat may also play a role in what happens to our post meal blood sugar. The impact of dietary protein on blood sugar has long been a topic of debate. Early research hypothesized that 100 g of ingested protein produced 50–80 g glucose. Later research showed, it was only ~ 10 g of glucose that showed up in the circulation following consumption of 50 g of protein (this is a serving of cooked meat about the size of a full outstretched woman’s hand). This equates to ~ 1 g of glucose produced from every 5 g of protein consumed. The results of the study below are consistent with this and, indicate consumption of ~ 75g and 100 g of protein ALONE may produce late rises in blood glucose which is similar to that from 15 and 20 g of glucose. This is relevant, given that 20 g of consumed glucose causes significant post meal excursions when insulin is NOT given. However, because the impact from protein (usually not covered by insulin) is delayed and sustained it shows a good reason we need consider dosing for protein dependent on portion consumed. Protein-rich meals may result in delaying the rise in blood glucose and produce a sustained high blood glucose. This indicates a need for more insulin for such meals or snacks as well as a new way to think about dosing insulin to offset the Continue reading >>

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar?

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar?

I’m considering whether I should advise my patients with diabetes to pay careful attention to the protein (particularly complete animal proteins) content of their diet. It’s an important issue to Dr. Richard K. Bernstein, who definitely says it has to be taken into account. Here are some of Dr. Bernstein’s ideas pulled from the current edition of Diabetes Solution: The liver (and the kidneys and intestines to a lesser extent) can convert protein to glucose, although it’s a slow and inefficient process. Since the conversion process—called gluconeogenesis—is slow and inefficient, diabetics don’t see the high blood sugar spikes they would see from many ingested carbohydrates. For example, 3 ounces (85 g) of hamburger patty could be converted to 6.5 g of glucose under the right circumstances. Protein foods from animals (e.g., meat, fish, chicken, eggs) are about 20% protein by weight. Dr. B recommends keeping protein portions in a particular meal consistent day-to-day (for example 6 ounces with each lunch). He recommends at least 1–1.2 g of protein per kilogram of ideal body weight for non-athletic adults. The minimum protein he recommends for a 155-lb non-athletic adult is 11.7–14 ounces daily. Growing children and athletes need more protein. Each uncooked ounce of the foods on his “protein foods” list (page 181) provides about 6 g of protein. On his eating plan, you choose the amount of protein in a meal that would satisfy you, which might be 3 ounces or 6–9 ounces. If you have gastroparesis, however, you should limit your evening meal protein to 2 ounces of eggs, cheese, fish, or ground meat, while eating more protein at the two earlier meals in the day. Dr. Bernstein wrote: “In many respects—and going against the grain of a number of the medi Continue reading >>

8 Steps To Balancing Blood Sugar

8 Steps To Balancing Blood Sugar

By now it's safe to say we all know that sugar is bad for us. When we were children, our parents told us it was bad for our teeth. But what about the rest of the body? What exactly happens when sugar is consumed and how does the body compensate for such high concentrations of sugar? You may have heard how important blood sugar balance is in the body, but why? What is ‘low glycemic', and how is weight gain associated with sugar? This blog is Sugar Basics 101 and includes foods and lifestyle suggestions that might be helpful when it comes to this balancing act. Did you know that having steady blood sugar levels is the one thing that every person who lives over 100 (centurion) has in common? Research shows that the best foods for enjoying good weight are those that don't cause a sharp rise in blood sugar levels. Balanced blood sugar is associated with physical and emotional health, as well as, and of course, longevity. If you are having problems losing weight, feeling moody, or feel the need for caffeine, you may have a problem balancing your blood sugar. Fortunately, not all blood sugar imbalances require drug treatments, and by taking control of your sugar consumption, you can greatly improve the way you feel. Blood sugar refers to glucose carried in the blood stream. Glucose is the immediate source of energy for all of the body's cells. The levels of glucose in the blood are monitored by the pancreas and are tightly regulated by several hormones. The body has the ability to store glucose in the form of glycogen in the muscles and the liver. When sugar or refined carbs are digested, they are initially absorbed in the small intestine. However, they do not enter the blood circulation directly and have to go to the liver first. Under hormone control, the liver will releas Continue reading >>

The Blood Sugar Roller Coaster

The Blood Sugar Roller Coaster

Most roller coasters are fun. Your stomach full of butterflies. Anticipating the unknown. The gigantic ups and downs. The delightful dizziness in your head. Most roller coaster rides last two to three minutes. Now, imagine riding a roller coaster all day long...no thanks! While its fun for a few minutes at an amusement park, when it comes to everyday living, riding the blood sugar roller coaster day in and day out is exhausting. It depletes you of energy, focus, and sets you up for weight gain. Its no way to live. You know youve been for a ride when youre constantly fighting sugar cravings, having trouble focusing, struggling to fall and/or staying asleep, experiencing mood swings, staving off low energy levels and battling with undesired weight gain or having trouble losing weight. Sound familiar? Let's get off that roller coaster. But first, we need to knowwho's to blame for the ride. Carbs. Carbohydrates are one of the three macronutrients (fat and protein are the other two). All carbohydrates are metabolized as sugar in your body. That means when you eat a carbohydrate, regardless of the source (bread, pasta, rice, cookies, candy, soda and even vegetables and fruits), it turns into sugar the moment it hits your bloodstream. Your blood sugar levels spike, which is alarming to your body, so it triggers your pancreas to quickly secrete yourfat-storing hormone called insulin. Insulins job is to unlock the door to your cells, allowing sugar to get into the cell and out of your bloodstream, in turn driving blood sugar levels back down to normal. Ultimately, your bodys goal is to bring you down from the top of that roller coaster! Now, you can use that sugar in your bloodstream for energy. If youre active shortly after consuming it, youll burn it off. The problem is so of Continue reading >>

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