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Prostate And Blood Sugar

Can Diabetes Cause Prostate Problems?

Can Diabetes Cause Prostate Problems?

Diabetes, especially when poorly managed, can result in prostate problems and in recent years studies have shown that the conditioncan worsen the symptoms of some prostate conditions, like benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or an enlarged prostate. According to previous studies, the exact relationship between BPH and diabetes is unclear because the specific pathway interfering in the development of both conditions is still poorly investigated. However, some researchers believe that being diabeticmay substantially influence the risk of BPH as well as lower urinary tract symptoms in older men. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) can be found in prostatic tissue and evidence suggests that IGF may alter male hormone activities, which in turn can have an influence on developing an enlarged prostate. Further studies hope to determine the effect of insulin and glucose control in the development of BPH. Then there is prostatitis inflammation of the prostate gland. Excess glucose in the bloodstream, hyperglycaemia, causes damage to blood vessels and nerves. This leads to several chronic conditions that affect feet, eyes, kidneys, the heart, and potentially the prostate. Excess sugars make the body less resistant to infections, and that is why when the condition is poorly managed itcauses frequent urinary tract infections and other infections in the body. Increased urinary tract infections can irritate the prostate area or cause bacteria to enter the prostate and lead to prostatitis. Currently, researchers are still unclear on whether diabetes can contribute to the development of prostate cancer. However, some evidence suggests a slightly reduced risk of prostate cancer in well-managed diabetic patients. This reduced risk of prostate cancer in well-managed diabetic patients has led Continue reading >>

Prostate Pain & High Blood Sugar

Prostate Pain & High Blood Sugar

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was just wondering... I'm 39 and the last 2 years I get bad prostate pain when my blood sugar is above 11. When it goes back to normal the pain goes away but when it's there it's like I'm bursting for a pee even when I'm not and when I do go it takes ages and is extreamly uncomfortable. I asked my gp and he said I was to young for prostate cancer and if it was the case I would have pain all the time. Does anyone else have this problem? I get this all the time it may be a urinery infection You may need. Strong Med to get rid of it the increase in your suger levels feeds the infection First, sadly you are never 'too young' to get prostate cancer although it would be very unsual. I would definitley ask for a prostate check by the GP i.e. finger job and then further investigation if needed. It could be a prostate infection rather than bladder/urine or something else. I wouldn't expect it to be related directly to diabetes but high blood suagr could exacerbate any infection. I was just wondering... I'm 39 and the last 2 years I get bad prostate pain when my blood sugar is above 11. When it goes back to normal the pain goes away but when it's there it's like I'm bursting for a pee even when I'm not and when I do go it takes ages and is extreamly uncomfortable. I asked my gp and he said I was to young for prostate cancer and if it was the case I would have pain all the time. Does anyone else have this problem? Go to your gp and ask for a psa test this will tell you what you need to know ( i had three tests as had cystitis leading to prostitis, now had some tissue removed from my prostate , waiting for results,good luck Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tied To Enlarged Prostate

Diabetes Tied To Enlarged Prostate

Home / Specialties / Men's Health / Diabetes Tied to Enlarged Prostate Researchers report that, BPH, or benign prostate hyperplasia, is a common condition in older men, but the risk of developing the condition seems to be increased by obesity and high blood sugar levels,. Dr. J. Kellogg Parsons from the University of California San Diego stated that, "BPH is a significant public health problem." "Our findings suggest that, with the current epidemics of obesity and diabetes, BPH will pose an even greater problem in the near future." BPH can lead to troublesome difficulty with urination urgency, discomfort, and incomplete voiding. The condition can be relieved surgically or by taking medication. Parsons team examined the association between BPH and factors such as obesity, blood glucose concentration and diabetes, with MRI measurement of prostate volumes in 422 men aged 27 to 84 years. Ninety-one (22 percent) of these participants had enlarged prostates. Plus, men with enlarged prostates were heavier and had a higher age-adjusted body mass index (BMI) than men without enlarged prostates, the authors report. Each 1-point rise in BMI was associated with a 0.41 cubic centimeter increase in prostate volume. Very obese men were especially likely to have an enlarged prostate, with 3.5-times the risk compared with their normal-weight counterparts. Blood glucose concentration was also associated with the risk of prostate enlargement, the results indicate. Those with elevated glucose had 3-times the risk of having an enlarged prostate. Diabetics were more than twice as likely to have prostate enlargement compared with men without diabetes, the researchers note. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, July 2006. ==================================================== Zsweet i Continue reading >>

Prostate-specific Antigen Values In Diabetic And Nondiabetic Us Men, 20012002

Prostate-specific Antigen Values In Diabetic And Nondiabetic Us Men, 20012002

Prostate-specific Antigen Values in Diabetic and Nondiabetic US Men, 20012002 Correspondence to Dr. Mona Saraiya, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Mail Stop K-55, 4770 Buford Highway NE, Atlanta, GA 30341 (e-mail: [email protected] ). Search for other works by this author on: American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 164, Issue 10, 15 November 2006, Pages 978983, David M. Werny, Mona Saraiya, Edward W. Gregg; Prostate-specific Antigen Values in Diabetic and Nondiabetic US Men, 20012002, American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 164, Issue 10, 15 November 2006, Pages 978983, Recent studies have shown that diabetic men have a lower risk of prostate cancer and that this association may be related to time since diagnosis. The authors examined the association between diabetes and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, controlling for potential confounders, in a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of the US population (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 20012002). Diabetes classification was self-reported, and undiagnosed diabetes was determined with fasting plasma glucose measurements. Controlling for age, men with self-reported diabetes had a 21.6% lower geometric mean PSA level than men without diabetes. The difference increased with years since diagnosis (>10 years: 27.5% lower geometric mean PSA level). Overweight men who had had diabetes for more than 10 years had a predicted geometric mean PSA level 40.8% lower than that of nondiabetic, normal-weight men. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that long-term diabetes is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer. The mechanism of this association may involve the regulation of PSA by androgens, although the authors are unable to confirm this as Continue reading >>

The Prostate And Diabetes

The Prostate And Diabetes

Home » Related Health Issues » The Prostate and Diabetes Related Health Issues Hypoglycaemia The Eyes and Diabetes The Kidneys and Diabetes Weight and Diet Exercise Your Heart Diabetic Neuropathy Diabetes and Coeliac Disease Stress, Anxiety and Depression The Prostate and Diabetes Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Joint and Muscle Problems Associated With Diabetes Impotence Women, Sex and Diabetes Osteoporosis – Is There A Link with Diabetes? An experience of the menopause The Prostate and Diabetes The prostate is a walnut-sized gland underneath the bladder in men that encircles the urethra [the tube that carries urine out of the body]. In adults the prostate often begins a new growth and tests have to be carried out to find out if this is benign or cancerous. If benign, it s called benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH and if not, it is localised prostate cancer but to date no tests have been found to entirely reliable. The pressure of the enlarged prostate may partially close the urethra causing various urinary problems, especially in older men. A study published in the Journal of Urology, June 2000, shows that in men with diabetes the symptoms of BPH are worse than in men without diabetes. The research looked at the records of 1,290 men with diabetes and 8,566 men without diabetes all of whom were having drug treatment for BPH. They compared BPH symptoms before and after drug treatment and found that men with diabetes had more symptoms and slower urine flow rate than those without diabetes. It showed that men with diabetes have symptoms as severe as non-diabetic men eleven years older and a urine flow rate the same as non-diabetic men seven years older. Facts about prostate cancer to put it in perspective Prostate cancer is slow growing so most men will die of something Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Prostate Cancer

High Blood Sugar And Prostate Cancer

Joshu:Controlling blood sugar can can significantly lower the risk of dying from prostate cancer. We found that men with high blood sugar and men with diabetes were more likely to die from prostate cancer. If you have pre-diabetes or diabetes, heres another reason to try to get your blood sugar under control: if you get prostate cancer, you are more likely to die from it. We knew from previous studies that men who have diabetes have a lower risk of developing prostate cancer, but that they may have a higher risk of dying from prostate cancer if they do develop it, says Corinne Joshu, Ph.D., M.P.H., senior author of the study. With colleagues Michael Marrone, M.P.H., and Elizabeth Platz, Sc.D., M.P.H., she aimed to understand more about the connections between blood sugar and prostate cancer. In an analysis of data from more than 5,000 cancer-free men in the Atherosclerosis in Communities study, they studied three markers for blood sugar in men who did not have diagnosed diabetes: fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and glycated albumin, Joshu explains, and worked to better classify low, normal, and high blood sugar. Men who were classified with high glycemia (blood sugar) on all three markers had almost a five times greater risk of dying from prostate cancer, compared to men who were normal on all three markers. Men with a diabetes diagnosis appeared to have a three-fold or greater risk of dying of prostate cancer and so did men who did not have diabetes who had low blood sugar. These patterns were consistent in black men and white men, notes Joshu. The results reinforce the importance of efforts to prevent the onset of diabetes, with weight loss, a healthy diet and exercise, and to maintain good blood sugar control in men with diabetes especially in black men, who suffer Continue reading >>

Is Salt, Coffee & Sugar Bad For Prostate Problems?

Is Salt, Coffee & Sugar Bad For Prostate Problems?

Prostate problems are common in older men.Photo Credit: Richard Griffin/iStock/Getty Images Is Salt, Coffee & Sugar Bad for Prostate Problems? Ireland Wolfe has been writing professionally since 2009, contributing to Toonari Post, Africana Online and Winzer Insurance. She obtained her Bachelor of Arts in psychology and Master of Arts in mental health counseling. She is also a licensed mental health counselor, registered nutritionist and yoga teacher. As men age, they are more likely to experience problems with their prostate gland. The prostate is a gland found in the male reproductive system located under the bladder. The prostate helps store and secrete hormones found in semen. A few problems can develop in the prostate including cancer. Certain foods help or aggravate some prostate problems. Consult your physician before making any dietary changes. Most problems of the prostate gland are benign, according to Ohio State University Medical Center. Benign prostatic hyperplasia is the most common noncancerous condition of the prostate, occurring in the majority of men after the age of 60. This condition involves symptoms similar to cancer, such as frequent urination and difficulty urinating. Prostatitis is an infection of the prostate and can cause symptoms such as pain or changes in urination. Prostate cancer is a slow-developing cancer that can often be successfully treated when caught early. Most Americans obtain too much sodium in their diet. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting sodium to less than 2,300 mg a day. People with certain conditions or who are over the age of 51 should reduce sodium to 1,500 mg per day. Although no specific research has linked salt to prostate problems, salt should generally be reduced anyway. Salt and sodium is a Continue reading >>

Why Sugar Kills Your Prostate

Why Sugar Kills Your Prostate

Over the last four decades especially, we have witnessed the substitution of many naturally occurring fats in products with sugar in an effort to make such products low-fat. Purported to be a major solution to increasing rates of cardiovascular disease, many Americans have gobbled up such products recent decades at alarming rates. However, more recent research suggests that many types of fats are not problematic at all when it comes to cardiovascular disease. In contrast, sugar may be a much bigger threat to cardiovascular health as well as contributing to many inflammatory disorders in the body including prosthetic enlargement. Of course for many aging men, this is of great concern, since BPH is such a commonly reported problem for men over the age of 50. Today Im going to discuss why its so important to keep your blood sugar balanced for not only prostate health but your overall health. You need to understand why a low sugar diet instead of a low-fat one is a much better strategy for overall improved health and inflammation status. Understanding the need for good fats in the diet While it is true that certain types of fats are best to avoid like trans fats, other types of fats are extremely nutritive and health supportive. Because of media hype, lack of nutritional education amongst many healthcare professionals and the public, many people in recent decades have largely become fat phobic. This trend is not without significant consequence, because we need adequate amounts of many types of fats in the diet to optimally function. Examples of such facts include omega-3 fatty acids, omega six fatty acids, and yes, saturated fats. Good natural sources of such items include: Nuts and seeds including chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax, pumpkin seeds, almonds, pecans, walnuts, haze Continue reading >>

How Bph Is Diagnosed

How Bph Is Diagnosed

You are here: Home > Prostate information > All about BPH > How BPH is diagnosed taken from Small Gland, Big Problem 4th Edition by Professor Roger Kirby, Health Press 2011 The spectrum of symptoms that are associated with BPH are known collectively as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS for short), and are outlined in the table overleaf. The symptoms of BPH overlap with those of other conditions, so your initial examination should be thorough. Your doctor will question you about your general health and symptoms. In order to assess your symptoms systematically, you may be asked questions that relate to a scoring system (an example of this system is shown on page 22). Your doctor will also be concerned with how bothersome you find your symptoms. Again, this can be approached in a systematic manner, and your responses can be scored. You will be asked about other conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, and what medications you are taking. Physical examination and digital rectal examination A digital rectal examination will be performed to give the doctor an idea of the size and consistency of your prostate (see page 20). He will also feel your abdomen to check whether your bladder is distended so that it can be felt (if it can, this is a sign that you may be retaining urine). Your doctor may also make an assessment of your nervous system, such as testing the muscle tone and sensation in the area around and between the scrotum and anus, as some disorders of the nervous system, such as Parkinsons disease or spinal cord problems, can give rise to urinary symptoms similar to those of BPH. Since high blood pressure (hypertension) is common, blood pressure may also be measured as part of a general health check. As a urinary tract infection can cause symptoms such as an in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Showing Promise For Prostate Cancer Treatment

Diabetes Drug Showing Promise For Prostate Cancer Treatment

Metformin—the drug that millions of people with diabetes take to control their blood sugar—may be on the brink of a second career. Evidence from a variety of studies suggests that metformin may delay or slow the progression of prostate cancer. At same time, researchers are finding that metformin does not seem to prevent the development of prostate cancer in the first place. One possible explanation for the discrepancy is that while metformin may curtail the survival of cancer cells, and so be helpful in treatment, it may not have much influence on the events that initiate cancer and transform normal cells into cancerous The interest in metformin’s anticancer potential is not limited to prostate cancer. On www.clinicaltrials.gov, maintained by the National Institutes of Health, you’ll find more than 60 clinical trials of metformin being tested as a treatment for many different cancers, including breast, colon, endometrial, and pancreatic cancer. A dozen different prostate cancer trials are listed, four of which are still recruiting volunteers. Part of the attraction here is that metformin is inexpensive. Metformin is sold under brand names like Glucophage and Fortamet but is readily available as a generic. For someone taking metformin for diabetes, a month’s supply of the generic can cost as little as $5. Study finding: Metformin use after diagnosis lowers risk of dying from prostate cancer The latest findings regarding metformin and prostate cancer come from a research group at the University of Toronto. Because of universal health insurance, Canada is a treasure trove of patient databases, and the Toronto researchers did this study by cross-referencing diabetes, cancer, and drug benefit databases for the province of Ontario. They study included 3,837 men with Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetes Affects Survival Rates In Prostate Cancer Patients

Management Of Diabetes Affects Survival Rates In Prostate Cancer Patients

Fox Chase Cancer Center - Philadelphia, PA Management of Diabetes Affects Survival Rates in Prostate Cancer Patients PHILADELPHIA (October 18, 2015) Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer found in men in the United States, affecting 14 percent, whereas diabetes affects about 9 percent of the population. Even though both conditions are often present in the same individual, it has not been clear how a diabetes diagnosis affects clinical outcomes for prostate cancer. Research at Fox Chase Cancer Center Temple Health showed that the answer depends on what type of anti-diabetic drugs, if any, prostate cancer patients are taking. By examining a large database of prostate cancer patients, the researchers found that diabetic individuals who either took insulin or did not take any anti-diabetic medications had lower survival rates and worse adverse effects from radiation therapy compared with non-diabetic patients. The findings were presented October 18 at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) in San Antonio, Texas. The implication of the study is that prevention and control of diabetes is important, particularly among cancer patients, said lead study investigator Nicholas G. Zaorsky, MD, resident physician in radiation oncology at Fox Chase. Men who are having their prostate cancer treated should be mindful of any other conditions they have been diagnosed with, and they should continue to see physicians who will manage these conditions appropriately. To examine the link between diabetes and prostate cancer, Zaorsky and his collaborators reviewed their prospectively collected institutional database of 3,176 men undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer. They then compared the outcomes Continue reading >>

Sugar, Grain, And Prostatitis

Sugar, Grain, And Prostatitis

The link between sugar (carbohydrates) and prostatitis is undeniable. This "food", along with sitting too much, and sexual overindulgence are probably responsible for over 96% of every prostatitis incident. It's Not Just the White Stuff on Your Kitchen Table Besides the granular white or brown stuff we keep on our dining tables, we have breads, rice, pastas, cookies, cakes, candies, jellies, honey, chocolates, soft drinks, alcohol in all forms, sweets of every nature..... This "food" substance is the best breeding ground for bacteria and yeast. It has been found that cancer can not live in the absence of sugar. This is why so many people have successfully rid themselves of cancer on the primitive diet. This "food" also greatly impairs the function of the cellular mitochondria (the part of each cell that creates energy). There Is No Way to Live On A High Sugar Diet Yet, most people believe all this sweet refined carbohydrate eating is "normal". They are only "normal" because society has done it for so long. "And, we currently have all the 'low fat' insanity." Grains metabolize more slowly than refined processed carbohydrate sweeteners. But, these are similar substances and still not the best foods for humans. And, not the foods that human bodies developed on. After the last 10,000 years of evolution, certain cultures can handle some grains better than others. The Asians can handle rice. The Europeans rye. No culture handles wheat very well. Especially modern wheat, which is not the same as what we grew 100 years ago. Everyone in all cultures, however, can improve in the absence or minimal use of grains. But, most diseases can be traced back to the beginning of agriculture (about 10,000 years back). In studies done on bone from before that time, none of the modern day di Continue reading >>

Prostate Size Correlates With Fasting Blood Glucose In Non-diabetic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients With Normal Testosterone Levels

Prostate Size Correlates With Fasting Blood Glucose In Non-diabetic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients With Normal Testosterone Levels

Prostate Size Correlates with Fasting Blood Glucose in Non-Diabetic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients with Normal Testosterone Levels We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Prostate Size Correlates with Fasting Blood Glucose in Non-Diabetic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients with Normal Testosterone Levels Won Tae Kim, Seok Joong Yun, [...], and Wun-Jae Kim We evaluated the correlations between BMI, fasting glucose, insulin, testosterone level, insulin resistance, and prostate size in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with normal testosterone levels. Data from 212 non-diabetic BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) due to medical treatment failure, were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels of 3 ng/mL underwent multicore transrectal prostate biopsy before TURP to rule out prostate cancer. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or serum testosterone levels of < 3.50 ng/mL were excluded from analysis. Correlations between clinical and laboratory parameters were determined. Prostate size correlated positively with age (r = 0.227, P < 0.001), PSA (r = 0.510, P < 0.001), and fasting glucose level (r = 0.186, P = 0.007), but not with BMI, testosterone, insulin level, or insulin resistance (each P > 0.05). Testosterone level inversely correlated with BMI (r = -0.327, P < 0.001), insulin leve Continue reading >>

Prostate Cancer: What It Is And Who It Affects

Prostate Cancer: What It Is And Who It Affects

Prostate Cancer: What It Is and Who It Affects First, the bad news. Research tells us that Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for several types of cancer, including breast, endometrial, colorectal, liver, and pancreatic cancer. Knowledge of the link between cancer and diabetes is actually nothing new. Back in 1910, a biostatistician made the connection between diabetes and cancer. More recently, studies have shown that diabetes does indeed increase cancer risk, likely, in part, due to the incidence of overweight and obesity, not-so-healthy food choices, and lack of sufficient physical activity (all modifiable risk factors, by the way). Now, for the somewhat good news. The risk of prostate cancer does not appear to be influenced by Type 2 diabetes. In fact, the risk of this cancer in men with Type 2 appears to be lower than in men without diabetes. However, men with diabetes are not off the hook that easily one study of men who had both prostate cancer and diabetes found that those who had higher A1C levels had a more aggressive type of prostate cancer. The researchers didnt find a link between level of glucose control and the chance of the cancer spreading or recurring. Prostate cancer obviously only occurs in men, as men have prostate glands (and women do not!). The prostate gland is about the size of a walnut and sits in front of the rectum and below the bladder. The prostate makes some of the fluid that nourishes sperm; the rest of the fluid is made by glands called seminal vesicles. The growth of the prostate gland is influenced by the male hormones called androgens, testosterone being the primary androgen. Testosterone is made in the testicles. Of note, men with Type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to have low testosterone levels than men without diabetes. It may be Continue reading >>

Hormone Therapy For Prostate Cancer May Raise Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Hormone Therapy For Prostate Cancer May Raise Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Home Type 2 Diabetes News and Research Hormone therapy for prostate cancer may raise type 2 diabetes risk Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a common treatment for men with aggressive forms of prostate cancer and has saved countless lives. However, a new study from a team of Philippine researchers suggests that the treatment may also raise a man's risk of type 2 diabetes . Testosterone is known to fuel the growth of prostate tumors. In men who have cancer that has spread beyond their prostate to other areas of their body, ADT is considered an invaluable method for shutting down the production of new tumor cells by stopping the body from producing more of the hormone. However, the treatment has been associated with a number of side effects. The new study, which was presented at the Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society, adds type 2 diabetes to the list of potential treatment complications. The findings confirm similar results attained in a 2009 study published in the journal Cancer. You may be interested in these related articles: Drug pairing may raise blood sugar, putting type 2 diabetics at risk For the present study, researchers from the Philippine General Hospital examined medical data from 38 men with advanced prostate cancer who were treated with ADT, comparing the information to the records of 36 individuals with less invasive tumors who were not treated with the hormone therapy. The results showed that men who were given ADT were roughly twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes, compared to those who received more conservative therapies. A total of 42 percent of those in the hormone treatment group developed the metabolic condition. Maria Luisa Cecilia Rivera-Arkoncel, MD, the lead researcher on the study, said that the results raise important questions Continue reading >>

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